Read by QxMD icon Read


Kengo Hirota, Hiroyuki Akagawa, Asami Kikuchi, Hideki Oka, Akihiko Hino, Tetsuryu Mitsuyama, Toshiyuki Sasaki, Hideaki Onda, Takakazu Kawamata, Hidetoshi Kasuya
Cerebral cavernous malformation is a neurovascular abnormality that can cause seizures, focal neurological deficits and intracerebral hemorrhage. Familial forms of this condition are characterized by de novo formation of multiple lesions and are autosomal-dominantly inherited via CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 mutations. We identified three truncating mutations in KRIT1 from three Japanese families with CCMs: a novel frameshift mutation, a known frameshift mutation and a known splice-site mutation that had not been previously analyzed for aberrant splicing...
2016: Human Genome Variation
Concetta Scimone, Placido Bramanti, Alessia Ruggeri, Luigi Donato, Concetta Alafaci, Concetta Crisafulli, Massimo Mucciardi, Carmela Rinaldi, Antonina Sidoti, Rosalia D'Angelo
BACKGROUND: Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular anomalies of the nervous system mostly located in the brain presenting sporadically or familial. Causes of familial forms are mutations in CCM1 (Krit1), CCM2 (MGC4607) and CCM3 (PDCD10) genes. Sporadic forms with no affected relative most often have only one lesion and no germ line mutations. However, a number of sporadic cases with multiple lesions have been reported and are indeed genetic cases with a de novo mutation or a mutation inherited from an asymptomatic parent...
October 13, 2016: BMC Medical Genetics
Chenlong Yang, Jizong Zhao, Bingquan Wu, Haohao Zhong, Yan Li, Yulun Xu
Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a congenital vascular anomaly predominantly located within the central nervous system. Its familial forms (familial cerebral cavernous malformation (FCCM)), inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with incomplete penetrance, are attributed to mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607, and CCM3/PDCD10 genes. To date, little is known about the genetic alterations leading to FCCM in the Chinese population. We aimed to investigate the genetic defect of FCCM by DNA sequencing in Chinese families...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: MN
Saverio Francesco Retta, Angela J Glading
Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) is a vascular disease of proven genetic origin, which may arise sporadically or is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and highly variable expressivity. CCM lesions exhibit a range of different phenotypes, including wide inter-individual differences in lesion number, size, and susceptibility to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Lesions may remain asymptomatic or result in pathological conditions of various type and severity at any age, with symptoms ranging from recurrent headaches to severe neurological deficits, seizures, and stroke...
September 14, 2016: International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology
Stefanie Spiegler, Bettina Kirchmaier, Matthias Rath, G Christoph Korenke, Fabian Tetzlaff, Maartje van de Vorst, Kornelia Neveling, Amparo Acker-Palmer, Andreas W Kuss, Christian Gilissen, Andreas Fischer, Stefan Schulte-Merker, Ute Felbor
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent slow-flow vascular lesions which harbour the risk to develop intracranial haemorrhages, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. Autosomal dominantly inherited CCMs were found to be associated with heterozygous inactivating mutations in 3 genes, CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10) in 1999, 2003 and 2005, respectively. Despite the availability of high-throughput sequencing techniques, no further CCM gene has been published since. Here, we report on the identification of an autosomal dominantly inherited frameshift mutation in a gene of thus far unknown function, FAM222B (C17orf63), through exome sequencing of CCM patients mutation-negative for CCM1-3...
July 2016: Molecular Syndromology
Elisa Merello, Marco Pavanello, Alessandro Consales, Samantha Mascelli, Alessandro Raso, Andrea Accogli, Armando Cama, Capra Valeria, Patrizia De Marco
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations mostly located within the central nervous system. Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607, and CCM3/PDCD10 genes are identified in about 90 % of familial cases of CCMs and two thirds of sporadic cases with multiple lesions. In this study, we performed genetic screening of a cohort of 31 patients, mainly pediatric. We analyzed the CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3 genes by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and direct sequencing of exons and intronic boundaries...
October 2016: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: MN
Huanjiao Jenny Zhou, Lingfeng Qin, Haifeng Zhang, Wenwen Tang, Weidong Ji, Yun He, Xiaoling Liang, Zongren Wang, Qianying Yuan, Alexander Vortmeyer, Derek Toomre, Germaine Fuh, Minghong Yan, Martin S Kluger, Dianqing Wu, Wang Min
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations that affect the central nervous system and result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizure and stroke. CCMs arise from loss-of-function mutations in one of three genes: KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3). PDCD10 mutations in humans often result in a more severe form of the disease relative to mutations in the other two CCM genes, and PDCD10-knockout mice show severe defects, the mechanistic basis for which is unclear. We have recently reported that CCM3 regulates exocytosis mediated by the UNC13 family of exocytic regulatory proteins...
September 2016: Nature Medicine
Zhenhua Wu, Yujuan Qi, Zhigang Guo, Peijun Li, Ding Zhou
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important gene regulators in both biological and pathological processes, including myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study investigated the effect of miR-613 on I/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and its molecular mechanism of action. Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) significantly increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, but these effects were attenuated by an miR-613 mimic. Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) was identified as a target gene of miR-613...
September 5, 2016: Bioscience Trends
Jaesung P Choi, Matthew Foley, Zinan Zhou, Weng-Yew Wong, Naveena Gokoolparsadh, J Simon C Arthur, Dean Y Li, Xiangjian Zheng
Mutations in CCM1 (aka KRIT1), CCM2, or CCM3 (aka PDCD10) gene cause cerebral cavernous malformation in humans. Mouse models of CCM disease have been established by deleting Ccm genes in postnatal animals. These mouse models provide invaluable tools to investigate molecular mechanism and therapeutic approaches for CCM disease. However, the full value of these animal models is limited by the lack of an accurate and quantitative method to assess lesion burden and progression. In the present study we have established a refined and detailed contrast enhanced X-ray micro-CT method to measure CCM lesion burden in mouse brains...
2016: PloS One
Saverio Marchi, Eliana Trapani, Mariangela Corricelli, Luca Goitre, Paolo Pinton, Saverio Francesco Retta
Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease of proven genetic origin affecting 0.3-0.5% of the general population. It is characterized by abnormally enlarged and leaky capillaries, which predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits and intracerebral hemorrhage. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in 3 genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 and PDCD10 (CCM3). While providing new options for the development of pharmacological therapies, recent advances in knowledge of the functions of these genes have clearly indicated that they exert pleiotropic effects on several biological pathways...
2016: Rare Diseases
Masaki Komiyama, Satoko Miyatake, Aiko Terada, Tomoya Ishiguro, Hiroyuki Ichiba, Naomichi Matsumoto
BACKGROUND: Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM) is a rare pediatric vascular malformation of the brain. Genetic backgrounds are not well elucidated. We report on a monozygotic twin with VGAM and his endovascular treatment, and the genetic analyses of the twins and their parents. CASE DESCRIPTION: In a monochorionic, diamniotic pregnancy of a 28-year-old healthy woman, monozygotic twins were born by emergency caesarian section because of fetal distress of the smaller twin at 25 weeks' and 4 days' gestation...
July 2016: World Neurosurgery
Changbin Shi, Robert Shenkar, Hussein A Zeineddine, Romuald Girard, Maged D Fam, Cecilia Austin, Thomas Moore, Rhonda Lightle, Lingjiao Zhang, Meijing Wu, Ying Cao, Murat Gunel, Angeliki Louvi, Autumn Rorrer, Carol Gallione, Douglas A Marchuk, Issam A Awad
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are relatively common vascular malformations, characterized by increased Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, vascular hyper-permeability and the presence of blood degradation products including non-heme iron. Previous studies revealed robust inflammatory cell infiltration, selective synthesis of IgG, in situ antigen driven B-cell clonal expansion, and deposition of immune complexes and complement proteins within CCM lesions. We aimed to evaluate the impact of suppressing the immune response on the formation and maturation of CCM lesions, as well as lesional iron deposition and ROCK activity...
June 2016: Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology: the Official Journal of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology
Zinan Zhou, Alan T Tang, Weng-Yew Wong, Sharika Bamezai, Lauren M Goddard, Robert Shenkar, Su Zhou, Jisheng Yang, Alexander C Wright, Matthew Foley, J Simon C Arthur, Kevin J Whitehead, Issam A Awad, Dean Y Li, Xiangjian Zheng, Mark L Kahn
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are common inherited and sporadic vascular malformations that cause strokes and seizures in younger individuals. CCMs arise from endothelial cell loss of KRIT1, CCM2 or PDCD10, non-homologous proteins that form an adaptor complex. How disruption of the CCM complex results in disease remains controversial, with numerous signalling pathways (including Rho, SMAD and Wnt/β-catenin) and processes such as endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) proposed to have causal roles...
April 7, 2016: Nature
Souvik Kar, Arpita Baisantry, Arya Nabavi, Helmut Bertalanffy
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) commonly known as cavernous hemangioma are associated with abnormally enlarged thin-walled blood vessels. As a result, these dilated capillaries are prone to leakage and result in hemorrhages. Clinically, such hemorrhages lead to severe headaches, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. CCM is caused by loss of function mutations in one of the three well-known CCM genes: Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1), OSM, and programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10). Loss of CCM genes have been shown to be synergistically related to decreased Notch signaling and excessive angiogenesis...
October 2016: Neurosurgical Review
Ye Zhang, Xingqian Hu, Xiaofei Miao, Kuiyu Zhu, Songkui Cui, Qingyang Meng, Jialin Sun, Tong Wang
Acquired chemoresistance represents a major obstacle in cancer treatment, the underlying mechanism of which is complex and not well understood. MiR-425-5p has been reported to be implicated tumorigenesis in a few cancer types. However, its role in regulating chemoresistance has not been investigated in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Microarray analysis was performed in isogenic chemosensitive and chemoresistant HCT116 cell lines to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. miRNA quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect miR-425-5p expression levels between drug resistant and parental cancer cells...
February 2016: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Nicole Lambertz, Nicolai El Hindy, Ilonka Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Klaus Peter Stein, Philipp Dammann, Neriman Oezkan, Oliver Mueller, Ulrich Sure, Yuan Zhu
BACKGROUND: Neovascularization and peritumoral edema are hallmarks of glioblastoma (GBM). Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) plays a pivotal role in regulating apoptosis, neoangiogenesis and vessel permeability and is implicated in certain tumor signaling pathways. However, little is known about PDCD10 in GBM. We aimed to investigate the expression pattern of PDCD10 and to identify the association of its expression with some molecular and clinical parameters in human GBM. METHODS: mRNA and protein expression of PDCD10 were examined respectively by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting in GBM (n = 27), astrocytoma grade II (n = 13) and control (n = 11)...
2015: BMC Cancer
Ju-Won Kim, Ji-Min Jeong, Jin-Sol Bae, Dong-Hee Cho, Sung Hee Jung, Jee-Youn Hwang, Mun-Gyeong Kwon, Jung Soo Seo, Gun-Wook Baeck, Chan-Il Park
In this study, we isolated and characterized programmed cell death10 (PDCD10), which is known to be related to apoptosis, from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus). The full-length rock bream PDCD10 (RbPDCD10) cDNA (1459 bp) contains an open reading frame of 633 bp that encodes 210 amino acids. Furthermore, multiple alignments revealed that the six of the α-helix bundles were well conserved among the other PDCD10 sequences tested. RbPDCD10 was significantly expressed in the liver, RBC (red blood cell), gill, intestine, trunk kidney and spleen...
February 2016: Developmental and Comparative Immunology
Rong Zhang, Xiaofeng Li, Titus J Boggon
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular dysplasias that usually occur in the brain and are associated with mutations in the KRIT1/CCM1, CCM2/MGC4607/OSM/Malcavernin, and PDCD10/CCM3/TFAR15 genes. Here we report the 2.9 Å crystal structure of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and FERM domain of the protein product of KRIT1 (KRIT1; Krev interaction trapped 1). The crystal structure reveals that the KRIT1 ARD contains 4 ankyrin repeats. There is an unusual conformation in the ANK4 repeat that is stabilized by Trp-404, and the structure reveals a solvent exposed ankyrin groove...
December 2015: Journal of Structural Biology
Saverio Marchi, Mariangela Corricelli, Eliana Trapani, Luca Bravi, Alessandra Pittaro, Simona Delle Monache, Letizia Ferroni, Simone Patergnani, Sonia Missiroli, Luca Goitre, Lorenza Trabalzini, Alessandro Rimessi, Carlotta Giorgi, Barbara Zavan, Paola Cassoni, Elisabetta Dejana, Saverio Francesco Retta, Paolo Pinton
Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3-0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms...
November 2015: EMBO Molecular Medicine
Svetlana M Stamatovic, Nikola Sladojevic, Richard F Keep, Anuska V Andjelkovic
Impairment of brain endothelial barrier integrity is critical for cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) lesion development. The current study investigates changes in tight junction (TJ) complex organization when PDCD10 (CCM3) is mutated/depleted in human brain endothelial cells. Analysis of lesions with CCM3 mutation and brain endothelial cells transfected with CCM3 siRNA (CCM3-knockdown) showed little or no increase in TJ transmembrane and scaffolding proteins mRNA expression, but proteins levels were generally decreased...
November 2015: Acta Neuropathologica
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"