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Neurocritical care

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129 papers 100 to 500 followers
By M KKhan Pediatric Intensivist
Mark S Wainwright
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: All critical care is directed at maintaining brain health, but recognizing neurologic complications of critical illness in children is difficult, and limited data exist to guide practice. This article discusses an approach to the recognition and management of seizures, stroke, and cardiac arrest as complications of other critical illnesses in the pediatric intensive care unit. RECENT FINDINGS: Convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures occur frequently in children after cardiac arrest or traumatic brain injury and during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation...
February 2018: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Maya Harary, Rianne G F Dolmans, William B Gormley
Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is a staple of neurocritical care. The most commonly used current methods of monitoring in the acute setting include fluid-based systems, implantable transducers and Doppler ultrasonography. It is well established that management of elevated ICP is critical for clinical outcomes. However, numerous studies show that current methods of ICP monitoring cannot reliably define the limit of the brain's intrinsic compensatory capacity to manage increases in pressure, which would allow for proactive ICP management...
February 5, 2018: Sensors
Kenneth E Remy, Jason W Custer, Joshua Cappell, Cortney B Foster, Nan A Garber, L Kyle Walker, Liliana Simon, Dayanand Bagdure
Purpose: Anti- N -methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is being recognized with increasing frequency among children. Given the paucity of evidence to guide the critical care management of these complex patients, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature with pooled analysis of published case reports and case series. Methods: We performed a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, and Web of Science for relevant published studies...
2017: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Divyanshu Dubey, Michel Toledano, Andrew McKeon
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We describe clinical and diagnostic features of various autoimmune and viral encephalitis subtypes. RECENT FINDINGS: Population-based studies have demonstrated both autoimmune and viral causes have similar prevalence and incident rates. Repertoire of autoimmune biomarkers has considerably increased with discovery of many novel neural antibodies including glial fibrillary acidic proteinα-immunoglobulin G. Similarly, with use of next generation sequencing and DNA libraries, many viral causes are being detected which would have been categorized as encephalitis of unknown cause a decade ago...
April 2018: Current Opinion in Critical Care
Matteo Gastaldi, Margherita Nosadini, Marianna Spatola, Stefano Sartori, Diego Franciotta
N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is the most common autoimmune encephalitis due to autoantibodies against neuronal surface antigens, can affect both children and adults, leading to neurological and neuropsychological sequelae. However, it is potentially treatable and the prompt start of immunotherapy associates with better prognosis. Conversely, misdiagnosis can be harmful. The detection of NMDAR antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid plays a pivotal role in the diagnostic work-up. Reliable methods for NMDAR antibody detection are thus fundamental to assure accurate diagnosis and allow early treatments...
February 2018: Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics
Georgia Tsaousi, Elisabetta Stazi, Marco Cinicola, Federico Bilotta
AIM: Osmotherapy constitutes a first-line intervention for intracranial hypertension management. However, hyperosmolar solutes exert various systematic effects, among which their impact on systemic hemodynamics is poorly clarified. This review aims to appraise the clinical evidence of the effect of mannitol and hypertonic saline (HTS) on cardiac performance in neurosurgical and neurocritical care patients. METHOD: A database search was conducted to identify randomized clinical trials and observational studies reporting HTS or mannitol use in acute brain injury setting...
December 16, 2017: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Laurent Carteron, Pierre Bouzat, Mauro Oddo
Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) allows bedside semicontinuous monitoring of patient brain extracellular fluid. Clinical indications of CMD monitoring are focused on the management of secondary cerebral and systemic insults in acute brain injury (ABI) patients [mainly, traumatic brain injury (TBI), subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)], specifically to tailor several routine interventions-such as optimization of cerebral perfusion pressure, blood transfusion, glycemic control and oxygen therapy-in the individual patient...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
Marius Nistor, Wilhelm Behringer, Martin Schmidt, René Schiffner
Severe trauma constitutes a major cause of death and disability, especially in younger patients. The cerebral autoregulatory capacity only protects the brain to a certain extent in states of hypovolemia; thereafter, neurological deficits and apoptosis occurs. We therefore set out to investigate neuroprotective strategies during haemorrhagic shock. This review was performed in accordance to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Before the start of the search, a review protocol was entered into the PROSPERO database...
October 26, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Roland Veltkamp, Jan Purrucker
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We review the current evidence for medical and surgical treatments of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). RECENT FINDINGS: Therapy with hemostatic agents (e.g. factor VIIa and tranexamic acid) if started early after bleeding onset may reduce hematoma expansion, but their clinical effectiveness has not been shown. Rapid anticoagulation reversal with prothrombin concentrates (PCC) plus vitamin K is the first choice in vitamin K antagonist-related ICH...
September 8, 2017: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
J Claude Hemphill, Arthur Lam
Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a subset of stroke due to spontaneous bleeding within the parenchyma of the brain. It is potentially lethal, and survival depends on ensuring an adequate airway, proper diagnosis, and early management of several specific issues such as blood pressure, coagulopathy reversal, and surgical hematoma evacuation for appropriate patients. ICH was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support (ENLS) protocol because intervention within the first hours may improve outcome, and it is critical to have site-specific protocols to drive care quickly and efficiently...
September 2017: Neurocritical Care
Peter Kramer, Oliver Miera, Felix Berger, Katharina Schmitt
AIM: To investigate if the serum biomarkers of cerebral injury, neuron-specific enolase and S100b protein, may classify unfavourable neurological outcome after paediatric cardiac arrest. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of neuron-specific enolase and S100b measurements from 95 children treated in our paediatric cardiac intensive care unit after cardiac arrest. Neurological outcome at discharge was evaluated using the paediatric cerebral performance category scale, with unfavourable outcome defined as a change of >1 compared to pre-arrest status or death...
September 20, 2017: Resuscitation
Joseph Donnelly, Marek Czosnyka, Hadie Adams, Chiara Robba, Luzius A Steiner, Danilo Cardim, Brenno Cabella, Xiuyun Liu, Ari Ercole, Peter John Hutchinson, David Krishna Menon, Marcel J H Aries, Peter Smielewski
OBJECTIVES: In severe traumatic brain injury, cerebral perfusion pressure management based on cerebrovascular pressure reactivity index has the potential to provide a personalized treatment target to improve patient outcomes. So far, the methods have focused on identifying "one" autoregulation-guided cerebral perfusion pressure target-called "cerebral perfusion pressure optimal". We investigated whether a cerebral perfusion pressure autoregulation range-which uses a continuous estimation of the "lower" and "upper" cerebral perfusion pressure limits of cerebrovascular pressure autoregulation (assessed with pressure reactivity index)-has prognostic value...
September 2017: Critical Care Medicine
Mypinder S Sekhon, Philip N Ainslie, Donald E Griesdale
Hypoxic ischemic brain injury (HIBI) after cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of mortality and long-term neurologic disability in survivors. The pathophysiology of HIBI encompasses a heterogeneous cascade that culminates in secondary brain injury and neuronal cell death. This begins with primary injury to the brain caused by the immediate cessation of cerebral blood flow following CA. Thereafter, the secondary injury of HIBI takes place in the hours and days following the initial CA and reperfusion. Among factors that may be implicated in this secondary injury include reperfusion injury, microcirculatory dysfunction, impaired cerebral autoregulation, hypoxemia, hyperoxia, hyperthermia, fluctuations in arterial carbon dioxide, and concomitant anemia...
April 13, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Venkatakrishna Rajajee, Robert J Fontana, Anthony J Courey, Parag G Patil
BACKGROUND: Acute liver failure (ALF) may result in elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). While invasive ICP monitoring (IICPM) may have a role in ALF management, these patients are typically coagulopathic and at risk for intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Contemporary ICP monitoring techniques and coagulopathy reversal strategies may be associated with a lower risk of hemorrhage. Our objective was to evaluate the safety, feasibility, impact on clinical management and outcomes associated with protocol-directed use of IICPM in ALF...
July 11, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
D Senger, F Erbguth
An average of 50-80% of patients treated in the intensive care unit is affected by disturbances of neuromuscular functions due to damage to the nerves and muscles, which has led to the terms critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy. Both components occur in 30-50% of patients, while the others predominantly show a pure myopathy, while pure neuropathy is rare. Meanwhile, the descriptive term of the concept as intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is preferred. The most significant risk factors for the development of ICUAW are sepsis, multiorgan dysfunction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)...
October 2017: Medizinische Klinik, Intensivmedizin und Notfallmedizin
Jamie Roper, M Emily Fleming, Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
BACKGROUND: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an uncommon autoimmune disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction and manifesting as muscle weakness. A multitude of stressors can exacerbate MG. When symptoms are exacerbated, muscle weakness can be severe enough to result in respiratory failure, a condition known as myasthenic crisis (MC). OBJECTIVE: This review discusses risk factors, diagnosis, management, and iatrogenic avoidance of MC. DISCUSSION: MC can affect any age, ethnicity, or sex and can be precipitated with any stressor, infection being the most common...
December 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Geert Meyfroidt, Ian J Baguley, David K Menon
A substantial minority of patients who survive an acquired brain injury develop a state of sympathetic hyperactivity that can persist for weeks or months, consisting of periodic episodes of increased heart rate and blood pressure, sweating, hyperthermia, and motor posturing, often in response to external stimuli. The unifying term for the syndrome-paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH)-and clear diagnostic criteria defined by expert consensus were only recently established. PSH has predominantly been described after traumatic brain injury (TBI), in which it is associated with worse outcomes...
September 2017: Lancet Neurology
M S Kalaiselvan, M K Renuka, A S Arunkumar
AIMS: The aim of this study was to study the clinical features and outcomes of patients with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: All adult patients admitted to our ICU with acute onset neurologic symptoms with focal vasogenic edema on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in the study. Data were collected on demography, coexisting illness, admission severity of illness, neurological symptoms, blood pressure, treatment initiated, and MRI findings...
July 2017: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Jonathan E Kurz, Craig M Smith, Mark S Wainwright
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cardiac arrest in childhood is associated with a high risk for mortality and poor long-term functional outcome. This review discusses the current evidence for neuroprotective therapies and goals for postarrest care in the context of the pathophysiology of hypoxic-ischemic injury, modalities for neurologic prognostication in these children and potential future monitoring paradigms for maximizing cerebral perfusion in the postarrest period. RECENT FINDINGS: The recent publication of the in-hospital and out-of-hospital Therapeutic Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest trials demonstrated a lack of statistically significant benefit for the use of postarrest therapeutic hypothermia...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
Steven G Achinger, Juan Carlos Ayus
OBJECTIVES: Hyponatremic encephalopathy, symptomatic cerebral edema due to a low osmolar state, is a medical emergency and often encountered in the ICU setting. This article provides a critical appraisal and review of the literature on identification of high-risk patients and the treatment of this life-threatening disorder. DATA SOURCES, STUDY SELECTION, AND DATA EXTRACTION: Online search of the PubMed database and manual review of articles involving risk factors for hyponatremic encephalopathy and treatment of hyponatremic encephalopathy in critical illness...
October 2017: Critical Care Medicine
2017-08-23 18:54:46
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