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Dolor y Paliativos

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10 papers 0 to 25 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27038972/new-chronic-pain-treatments-in-the-outpatient-setting-review-article
#1
REVIEW
R Grandhe, D Souzdalnitski, K Gritsenko
Chronic pain is an issue encountered by many health care providers in their routine clinical practice. In addition to generalized patient suffering, this condition has significant clinical, psychological, and socioeconomic impact due to its widespread occurrence. The landscape of chronic pain management has been changing rapidly with an array of treatment innovations, better understanding of established therapies, and care coordination across specialties. In this article, we have reviewed emerging new modalities as well as transformation of established therapies by interventional, pharmacologic, rehabilitative, psychological, complimentary, and interdisciplinary approaches...
May 2016: Current Pain and Headache Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27727452/hydromorphone-for-cancer-pain
#2
REVIEW
Yan J Bao, Wei Hou, Xiang Y Kong, Liping Yang, Jun Xia, Bao J Hua, Roger Knaggs
BACKGROUND: Cancer pain is an important and distressing symptom that tends to increase in frequency and intensity as the cancer advances. For people with advanced cancer, the prevalence of pain can be as high as 90%. It has been estimated that 30% to 50% of people with cancer categorise their pain as moderate to severe, with between 75% and 90% of people with cancer experiencing pain that they describe as having a major impact on their daily life. Epidemiological studies suggest that approximately 15% of people with cancer pain fail to experience acceptable pain relief with conventional management...
October 11, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27732996/palliative-care-in-lung-cancer-a-review
#3
Brett C Bade, Gerard A Silvestri
Lung cancer patients are at high risk of suffering due to severe and refractory symptoms, concomitant respiratory comorbidity, frequent disease progression, and treatment that can worsen and compromise quality of life. Palliative care (PC) has shown multiple benefits to cancer patients such as better quality of life, higher patient and family satisfaction, improved disease understanding, less symptom burden, fewer depressive symptoms, less aggressive end of life care, and even improved survival with early implementation...
October 2016: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27647717/codeine-time-to-say-no
#4
Joseph D Tobias, Thomas P Green, Charles J Coté
Codeine has been prescribed to pediatric patients for many decades as both an analgesic and an antitussive agent. Codeine is a prodrug with little inherent pharmacologic activity and must be metabolized in the liver into morphine, which is responsible for codeine's analgesic effects. However, there is substantial genetic variability in the activity of the responsible hepatic enzyme, CYP2D6, and, as a consequence, individual patient response to codeine varies from no effect to high sensitivity. Drug surveillance has documented the occurrence of unanticipated respiratory depression and death after receiving codeine in children, many of whom have been shown to be ultrarapid metabolizers...
September 19, 2016: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27771786/do-not-resuscitate-orders-in-cancer-patients-a-review-of-literature
#5
Aart Osinski, Gerard Vreugdenhil, Jan de Koning, Johannes G van der Hoeven
Discussing do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders is part of daily hospital practice in oncology departments. Several medical factors and patient characteristics are associated with issuing DNR orders in cancer patients. DNR orders are often placed late in the disease process. This may be a cause for disagreements between doctors and between doctors and patients and may cause for unnecessary treatments and admissions. In addition, DNR orders on itself may influence the rest of the medical treatment for patients. We present recommendations for discussing DNR orders and medical futility in practice through shared decision-making...
October 22, 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23556990/the-use-of-very-low-dose-methadone-for-palliative-pain-control-and-the-prevention-of-opioid-hyperalgesia
#6
Shelley R Salpeter, Jacob S Buckley, Eduardo Bruera
BACKGROUND: Opioid dose escalation may cause hyperalgesia, mediated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) pathway. Methadone is an atypical opioid that inhibits hyperalgesia through NMDA-blockade, especially at low doses. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of using very-low-dose methadone as the sole long-acting opioid agent in a hospice practice. DESIGN: A retrospective, observational study of the use of methadone, ≤15 mg daily, with as-needed short-acting opiates...
June 2013: Journal of Palliative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27382120/updates-in-the-management-of-brain-metastases
#7
REVIEW
Nils D Arvold, Eudocia Q Lee, Minesh P Mehta, Kim Margolin, Brian M Alexander, Nancy U Lin, Carey K Anders, Riccardo Soffietti, D Ross Camidge, Michael A Vogelbaum, Ian F Dunn, Patrick Y Wen
The clinical management/understanding of brain metastases (BM) has changed substantially in the last 5 years, with key advances and clinical trials highlighted in this review. Several of these changes stem from improvements in systemic therapy, which have led to better systemic control and longer overall patient survival, associated with increased time at risk for developing BM. Development of systemic therapies capable of preventing BM and controlling both intracranial and extracranial disease once BM are diagnosed is paramount...
August 2016: Neuro-oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24556532/end-of-life-care-in-patients-with-heart-failure
#8
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
David J Whellan, Sarah J Goodlin, Michael G Dickinson, Paul A Heidenreich, Connie Jaenicke, Wendy Gattis Stough, Michael W Rich
Stage D heart failure (HF) is associated with poor prognosis, yet little consensus exists on the care of patients with HF approaching the end of life. Treatment options for end-stage HF range from continuation of guideline-directed medical therapy to device interventions and cardiac transplantation. However, patients approaching the end of life may elect to forego therapies or procedures perceived as burdensome, or to deactivate devices that were implanted earlier in the disease course. Although discussing end-of-life issues such as advance directives, palliative care, or hospice can be difficult, such conversations are critical to understanding patient and family expectations and to developing mutually agreed-on goals of care...
February 2014: Journal of Cardiac Failure
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27625354/safe-use-of-subcutaneous-diphenhydramine-in-the-inpatient-hospice-unit
#9
Aileen Chen, Erwin J Loquias, Ramesh Roshan, Richard Levene, Raymond Zelhof, Terry Hickey, Gail Austin Cooney, Faustino Gonzalez
BACKGROUND: Diphenhydramine (DPH) is most commonly used via oral, topical, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) routes for the palliation of pruritus, treatment of extrapyramidal symptoms, management of parkinsonism and for allergic reactions. However, many hospice patients are unable to take oral medications and/or do not have IV access. Moreover, topical administration has a relatively slow rate of absorption. For this reason, in the hospice setting it is not uncommon for diphenhydramine to be administered via the subcutaneous (SC) route secondary to its ease of access, low infection rates and its low levels of discomfort...
September 13, 2016: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27542430/symptom-control-at-the-end-of-life
#10
REVIEW
Margaret Kreher
Symptom control at the end of life is an identified ongoing gap in end-of-life care. Increased demand for high-quality symptom control; limited supply of specialty trained clinicians; lack of consistent high-quality evidence-based interventions; and education deficits among clinicians, patients, and families in end-of-life processes contribute to this gap. High-value end-of-life care is centered on high-quality communication about goals of care. This article reviews primary palliative care concepts of communication and symptom control to provide a framework for primary care physicians to use in the care of patients at the end of life...
September 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
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