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6 papers 0 to 25 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25857657/bell-s-palsy-aetiology-clinical-features-and-multidisciplinary-care
#1
REVIEW
Timothy J Eviston, Glen R Croxson, Peter G E Kennedy, Tessa Hadlock, Arun V Krishnan
Bell's palsy is a common cranial neuropathy causing acute unilateral lower motor neuron facial paralysis. Immune, infective and ischaemic mechanisms are all potential contributors to the development of Bell's palsy, but the precise cause remains unclear. Advancements in the understanding of intra-axonal signal molecules and the molecular mechanisms underpinning Wallerian degeneration may further delineate its pathogenesis along with in vitro studies of virus-axon interactions. Recently published guidelines for the acute treatment of Bell's palsy advocate for steroid monotherapy, although controversy exists over whether combined corticosteroids and antivirals may possibly have a beneficial role in select cases of severe Bell's palsy...
December 2015: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27068689/management-of-endocrine-disease-pituitary-incidentaloma-neuroradiological-assessment-and-differential-diagnosis
#2
REVIEW
Vladimir Vasilev, Liliya Rostomyan, Adrian F Daly, Iulia Potorac, Sabina Zacharieva, Jean-François Bonneville, Albert Beckers
Pituitary incidentalomas are a by-product of modern imaging technology. The term 'incidentaloma' is neither a distinct diagnosis nor a pathological entity. Rather, it is a collective designation for different entities that are discovered fortuitously, requiring a working diagnosis based on the input of the radiologist, endocrinologist and often a neurosurgeon. In addition to pathological conditions affecting the pituitary gland, a thorough knowledge of the radiological characteristics of normal variants and technical artifacts is required to arrive at an accurate differential diagnosis...
October 2016: European Journal of Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26948435/guillain-barr%C3%A3-syndrome
#3
REVIEW
Hugh J Willison, Bart C Jacobs, Pieter A van Doorn
Guillain-Barré syndrome is the most common and most severe acute paralytic neuropathy, with about 100,000 people developing the disorder every year worldwide. Under the umbrella term of Guillain-Barré syndrome are several recognisable variants with distinct clinical and pathological features. The severe, generalised manifestation of Guillain-Barré syndrome with respiratory failure affects 20-30% of cases. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange is the optimal management approach, alongside supportive care...
August 13, 2016: Lancet
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27306631/trigeminal-neuralgia-new-classification-and-diagnostic-grading-for-practice-and-research
#4
REVIEW
Giorgio Cruccu, Nanna B Finnerup, Troels S Jensen, Joachim Scholz, Marc Sindou, Peter Svensson, Rolf-Detlef Treede, Joanna M Zakrzewska, Turo Nurmikko
Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is an exemplary condition of neuropathic facial pain. However, formally classifying TN as neuropathic pain based on the grading system of the International Association for the Study of Pain is complicated by the requirement of objective signs confirming an underlying lesion or disease of the somatosensory system. The latest version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders created similar difficulties by abandoning the term symptomatic TN for manifestations caused by major neurologic disease, such as tumors or multiple sclerosis...
July 12, 2016: Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27521393/dual-antiplatelet-therapy-for-secondary-stroke-prevention-use-of-clopidogrel-and-acetylsalicylic-acid-after-noncardioembolic-ischemic-stroke
#5
REVIEW
Karolina Koziol, Vanessa Van der Merwe, Erin Yakiwchuk, Lynette Kosar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27445240/syncope-case-studies
#6
REVIEW
Inna Kleyman, Louis H Weimer
Syncope, or the sudden loss of consciousness, is a common presenting symptom for evaluation by neurologists. It is not a unique diagnosis but rather a common manifestation of disorders with diverse mechanisms. Loss of consciousness is typically preceded by a prodrome of symptoms and sometimes there is a clear trigger. This article discusses several cases that illustrate the various causes of syncope. Reflex syncope is the most common type and includes neurally mediated, vasovagal, situational, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, and atypical forms...
August 2016: Neurologic Clinics
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