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Parkinsons Disease & NIR

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137 papers 25 to 100 followers Effect of trans-cranial and intracranial near infrared light in Parkinson's Disease. Plus assorted articles on PD which will be helpful in trying to understand the effect of NIR in PD.
Motoki Fujimaki, Shinji Saiki, Yuanzhe Li, Naoko Kaga, Hikari Taka, Taku Hatano, Kei-Ichi Ishikawa, Yutaka Oji, Akio Mori, Ayami Okuzumi, Takahiro Koinuma, Shin-Ichi Ueno, Yoko Imamichi, Takashi Ueno, Yoshiki Miura, Manabu Funayama, Nobutaka Hattori
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the kinetics and metabolism of caffeine in serum from patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and controls using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. METHODS: Levels of caffeine and its 11 metabolites in serum from 108 patients with PD and 31 age-matched healthy controls were examined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Mutations in caffeine-associated genes were screened by direct sequencing. RESULTS: Serum levels of caffeine and 9 of its downstream metabolites were significantly decreased even in patients with early PD, unrelated to total caffeine intake or disease severity...
January 30, 2018: Neurology
Vera Gramigna, Giovanni Pellegrino, Antonio Cerasa, Simone Cutini, Roberta Vasta, Giuseppe Olivadese, Iolanda Martino, Aldo Quattrone
Walking is a complex motor behavior with a special relevance in clinical neurology. Many neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and stroke, are characterized by gait disorders whose neurofunctional correlates are poorly investigated. Indeed, the analysis of real walking with the standard neuroimaging techniques poses strong challenges, and only a few studies on motor imagery or walking observation have been performed so far. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is becoming an important research tool to assess functional activity in neurological populations or for special tasks, such as walking, because it allows investigating brain hemodynamic activity in an ecological setting, without strong immobility constraints...
May 2017: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Song Li, Jie Dong, Cheng Cheng, Weidong Le
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder caused by the selective and progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although PD has been heavily researched, the precise etiology and pathogenesis for PD are still inconclusive. Consequently, current pharmacological treatments for PD are largely symptomatic rather than preventive and there is still no cure for this disease nowadays. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms caused by intrinsic PD pathology or side effects induced by currently used pharmacological interventions are gaining increasing attention and urgently need to be treated due to their influence on quality of life...
November 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Insoo Jang, Changho Han
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2014: Photomedicine and Laser Surgery
Kinan Muhammed, Sanjay Manohar, Masud Husain
BACKGROUND: Apathy is a common syndrome observed in many neurological conditions, including in up to 70% of patients with Parkinson's disease. Mechanisms underlying apathy are poorly understood and clinically we lack robust, objective detection methods. We aimed to address this using novel objective measures of motivation and reward sensitivity in relation to apathy in patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: Saccadic velocity and pupil modulation by reward were used as objective metrics of motivation in patients with Parkinson's disease...
February 26, 2015: Lancet
Aaron de Souza, Rainha J de Souza
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
Napoleon Torres, Jenny Molet, Cecile Moro, John Mitrofanis, Alim Louis Benabid
Although there have been many pharmacological agents considered to be neuroprotective therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, neurosurgical approaches aimed to neuroprotect or restore the degenerative nigrostriatal system have rarely been the focus of in depth reviews. Here, we explore the neuroprotective strategies involving invasive surgical approaches (NSI) using neurotoxic models 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which have led to clinical trials. We focus on several NSI approaches, namely deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, glial neurotrophic derived factor (GDNF) administration and cell grafting methods...
October 20, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Peizhou Jiang, Dennis W Dickson
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive movement disorder of adults and the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. Neuropathologic diagnosis of PD requires moderate-to-marked neuronal loss in the ventrolateral substantia nigra pars compacta and α-synuclein (αS) Lewy body pathology. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration correlates with the Parkinsonian motor features, but involvement of other peripheral and central nervous system regions leads to a wide range of non-motor features...
January 2018: Acta Neuropathologica
Mirella Díaz-Santos, Bo Cao, Arash Yazdanbakhsh, Daniel J Norton, Sandy Neargarder, Alice Cronin-Golomb
Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with motor and non-motor rigidity symptoms (e.g., cognitive and personality). The question is raised as to whether rigidity in PD also extends to perception, and if so, whether perceptual, cognitive, and personality rigidities are correlated. Bistable stimuli were presented to 28 non-demented individuals with PD and 26 normal control adults (NC). Necker cube perception and binocular rivalry were examined during passive viewing, and the Necker cube was additionally used for two volitional-control conditions: Hold one percept in front, and Switch between the two percepts...
March 2015: Neuropsychologia
Ahmed A Moustafa, Srinivasa Chakravarthy, Joseph R Phillips, Ankur Gupta, Szabolcs Keri, Bertalan Polner, Michael J Frank, Marjan Jahanshahi
Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a range of motor symptoms. Besides the cardinal symptoms (akinesia and bradykinesia, tremor and rigidity), PD patients show additional motor deficits, including: gait disturbance, impaired handwriting, grip force and speech deficits, among others. Some of these motor symptoms (e.g., deficits of gait, speech, and handwriting) have similar clinical profiles, neural substrates, and respond similarly to dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation (DBS). Here, we provide an extensive review of the clinical characteristics and neural substrates of each of these motor symptoms, to highlight precisely how PD and its medical and surgical treatments impact motor symptoms...
September 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Yuri Kwon, Sang-Hoon Park, Ji-Won Kim, Yeji Ho, Hyeong-Min Jeon, Min-Jung Bang, Seong-Beom Koh, Jong-Hyun Kim, Gwang-Moon Eom
This study aims at the quantification of fine change in parkinsonian rigidity at the wrist during deep brain stimulation (DBS) using a portable measurement system and objective mechanical measures. The rigidity of fourteen limbs was evaluated during DBS surgery. The resistive torque to imposed movement was measured for every setting where a reduction in rigidity was perceived by a neurologist. Quantitative mechanical measures derived from experimental data included viscoelastic properties, work, impulse and mechanical impedance...
2014: Bio-medical Materials and Engineering
Ashlee M Hendy, Alex Tillman, Timo Rantalainen, Makii Muthalib, Liam Johnson, Dawson J Kidgell, Daniel Wundersitz, Peter G Enticott, Wei-Peng Teo
BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) results from a loss of dopamine in the brain, leading to movement dysfunctions such as bradykinesia, postural instability, resting tremor and muscle rigidity. Furthermore, dopamine deficiency in PD has been shown to result in maladaptive plasticity of the primary motor cortex (M1). Progressive resistance training (PRT) is a popular intervention in PD that improves muscular strength and results in clinically significant improvements on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)...
July 19, 2016: Trials
Tõnu Rätsep, Toomas Asser
BACKGROUND: Myotonometric evaluation of viscoelastic stiffness of skeletal muscles has been proposed to document the effect of surgical or pharmacological treatment on rigidity in patients with Parkinson's disease. The aim of the study was to analyze the changes of viscoelastic stiffness induced by deep brain stimulation. METHODS: Fifteen patients in an advanced stage of Parkinson's disease participated in the study. The study took place in the off-medication conditions after one night of drug withdrawal...
May 2017: Clinical Biomechanics
Kyum-Yil Kwon, Minjik Kim, Seon-Min Lee, Sung Hoon Kang, Hye Mi Lee, Seong-Beom Koh
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Arm and leg swings during gait are reduced and asymmetric in Parkinson's disease (PD). Although rigidity and bradykinesia are interconnected with each other, and related with gait hypokinesia including arm and leg swing alteration, it remains uncertain which factor is more responsible for the decrease of arm and leg swings. The study aimed to uncover which factor between rigidity and bradykinesia is more associated with the reduction of arm and leg swings during gait...
June 15, 2014: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Yanbing Hou, Chunyan Luo, Jing Yang, Ruwei Ou, Wanglin Liu, Wei Song, Qiyong Gong, Huifang Shang
Parkinson's disease (PD) with akinetic rigidity (PD AR ) is more likely to develop cognitive deficits compared to PD with tremor-dominant symptoms (PD TD ). The default mode network (DMN) is highly relevant for cognitive processes, so this study tested the functional connectivity (FC) of DMN in cognitively unimpaired PD AR patients. Resting-state fMRI data were collected in 21 cognitively unimpaired early stage drug-naïve patients with PD AR and 21 healthy controls (HC). PD patients were matched closely to HCs for demographic and cognitive variables...
January 2017: Journal of Neurology
Panchanan Maiti, Jayeeta Manna, Gary L Dunbar
Gradual degeneration and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, pars compacta and subsequent reduction of dopamine levels in striatum are associated with motor deficits that characterize Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, half of the PD patients also exhibit frontostriatal-mediated executive dysfunction, including deficits in attention, short-term working memory, speed of mental processing, and impulsivity. The most commonly used treatments for PD are only partially or transiently effective and are available or applicable to a minority of patients...
2017: Translational Neurodegeneration
Laís M S Neves, Elaine C D Gonçalves, Juliana Cavalli, Graziela Vieira, Larissa R Laurindo, Róli R Simões, Igor S Coelho, Adair R S Santos, Alexandre M Marcolino, Maíra Cola, Rafael C Dutra
Although photobiomodulation therapy (PBM) has been applied clinically for the treatment of pain and inflammation, wound healing, sports and soft tissue injuries, as well as to repair injured spinal cords and peripheral nerves, it remains unclear which molecular substrates (receptor) are implicated in the cellular mechanisms of PBM. Here, we reported that PBM (660 nm, 30 mW, 0.06 cm2, 50 J/cm2, plantar irradiation) significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced paw oedema, but not noxious thermal response, through positive modulation to both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors...
October 4, 2017: Molecular Neurobiology
Miguel Tábuas-Pereira, Isabel Santana, Gustavo Cordeiro Santo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 10, 2017: Neurology
Cornelius J H M Klemann, Helena Xicoy, Geert Poelmans, Bas R Bloem, Gerard J M Martens, Jasper E Visser
Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), resulting in motor and non-motor dysfunction. Physical exercise improves these symptoms in PD patients. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of physical exercise, we exposed 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrimidine (MPTP)-treated mice to a four-week physical exercise regimen, and subsequently explored their motor performance and the transcriptome of multiple PD-linked brain areas...
October 10, 2017: Molecular Neurobiology
Lisa Zondler, Marcus Kostka, Patrick Garidel, Udo Heinzelmann, Bastian Hengerer, Benjamin Mayer, Jochen H Weishaupt, Frank Gillardon, Karin M Danzer
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide and characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the patients' midbrains. Both the presence of the protein α-synuclein in intracellular protein aggregates in surviving neurons and the genetic linking of the α-synuclein encoding gene point towards a major role of α-synuclein in PD etiology. The exact pathogenic mechanisms of PD development are not entirely described to date, neither is the specific role of α-synuclein in this context...
2017: PloS One
2017-10-03 12:28:37
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