collection
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Ventilation stratigies

shared collection
35 papers 0 to 25 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29694993/new-ventilator-strategies-high-frequency-oscillatory-ventilation-combined-with-volume-guarantee
#1
M Sánchez-Luna, N González-Pacheco, J Belik, M Santos, F Tendillo
High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) has been proposed as an alternative method of invasive ventilation in immature infants to prevent ventilator lung injury. To better control the size of the high-frequency tidal volume and to prevent large tidal volumes, a new strategy of controlling the tidal volume during HFOV (VThf) has been developed, HFOV-volume guarantee (VG). Data from preclinical, neonatal animal studies in normal and surfactant-depleted lungs have demonstrated the feasibility of this technique to directly control the VThf in the normal compliance and low compliance situations...
May 2018: American Journal of Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29461885/physiologic-basis-of-mechanical-ventilation
#2
Martin J Tobin
The primary purpose of mechanical ventilation is to decrease work of breathing. Achieving this goal requires that cycling of the ventilator be carefully aligned with the intrinsic rhythm of a patient's respiratory center output. Problems arise at the point of ventilator triggering, post-trigger inflation, and inspiration-expiration switchover. Careful, iterative adjustments of ventilator settings are required to minimize work of breathing. Use of protocols for the selection of ventilator settings can lead to complications (including alveolar overdistention) and risk of death...
February 2018: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26715607/noninvasive-respiratory-support
#3
James J Cummings, Richard A Polin
Mechanical ventilation is associated with increased survival of preterm infants but is also associated with an increased incidence of chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia) in survivors. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is a form of noninvasive ventilation that reduces the need for mechanical ventilation and decreases the combined outcome of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Other modes of noninvasive ventilation, including nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation, biphasic positive airway pressure, and high-flow nasal cannula, have recently been introduced into the NICU setting as potential alternatives to mechanical ventilation or nCPAP...
January 2016: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29353261/impact-of-delivered-tidal-volume-on-the-occurrence-of-intraventricular-haemorrhage-in-preterm-infants-during-positive-pressure-ventilation-in-the-delivery-room
#4
Qaasim Mian, Po-Yin Cheung, Megan O'Reilly, Samantha K Barton, Graeme R Polglase, Georg M Schmölzer
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Delivery of inadvertent high tidal volume (VT ) during positive pressure ventilation (PPV) in the delivery room is common. High VT delivery during PPV has been associated with haemodynamic brain injury in animal models. We examined if VT delivery during PPV at birth is associated with brain injury in preterm infants <29 weeks' gestation. METHODS: A flow-sensor was placed between the mask and the ventilation device. VT values were compared with recently described reference ranges for VT in spontaneously breathing preterm infants at birth...
January 20, 2018: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29281936/a-comparative-study-of-hhhfnc-and-ncpap-in-preventing-reintubation-in-extreme-preterm-infants-born-at-less-than-30-week-gestation
#5
Wisam Muhsen, Rahul Roy
INTRODUCTION: Despite recent advances in respiratory support, the wide use of antenatal steroids and surfactant-replacement therapy, respiratory problems continue to represent the leading cause of mortality in premature infants during the neonatal period. In the last few years, HHHFNC has been widely adopted as a mode of noninvasive respiratory support for infants with respiratory difficulties. However, data of the safety and efficacy of HHHFNC use in extremely premature infants are scarce...
January 11, 2018: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29077984/neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-compared-to-other-forms-of-triggered-ventilation-for-neonatal-respiratory-support
#6
REVIEW
Thomas E Rossor, Katie A Hunt, Sandeep Shetty, Anne Greenough
BACKGROUND: Effective synchronisation of infant respiratory effort with mechanical ventilation may allow adequate gas exchange to occur at lower peak airway pressures, potentially reducing barotrauma and volutrauma and development of air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. During neurally adjusted ventilatory assist ventilation (NAVA), respiratory support is initiated upon detection of an electrical signal from the diaphragm muscle, and pressure is provided in proportion to and synchronous with electrical activity of the diaphragm (EADi)...
October 27, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29039883/volume-targeted-versus-pressure-limited-ventilation-in-neonates
#7
REVIEW
Claus Klingenberg, Kevin I Wheeler, Naomi McCallion, Colin J Morley, Peter G Davis
BACKGROUND: Damage caused by lung overdistension (volutrauma) has been implicated in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Modern neonatal ventilation modes can target a set tidal volume as an alternative to traditional pressure-limited ventilation (PLV) using a fixed inflation pressure. Volume-targeted ventilation (VTV) aims to produce a more stable tidal volume in order to reduce lung damage and stabilise the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2 ). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether VTV compared with PLV leads to reduced rates of death and death or BPD in newborn infants and to determine whether use of VTV affected outcomes including air leak, cranial ultrasound findings and neurodevelopment...
October 17, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28871620/oropharyngeal-surfactant-can-improve-initial-stabilisation-and-reduce-rescue-intubation-in-infants-born-below-25-weeks-of-gestation
#8
Tereza Lamberska, Eva Settelmayerova, Jan Smisek, Marketa Luksova, Gabriela Maloskova, Richard Plavka
AIM: Minimally aggressive and easily performed techniques that facilitate spontaneous respiratory stabilisation are required to reduce rescue intubation in extremely premature infants. This study evaluated the feasibility and safety of administering surfactant into the pharynx of infants born at <25 weeks immediately after birth. METHODS: This study of 19 infants was conducted from January 2013 to June 2014 in a tertiary perinatal centre in Prague. We administered 1...
January 2018: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223010/the-role-of-heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-as-noninvasive-respiratory-support-in-neonates
#9
REVIEW
Ke-Yun Chao, Yi-Ling Chen, Li-Yi Tsai, Yu-Hsuan Chien, Shu-Chi Mu
Recently, heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) has been introduced and applied as a noninvasive respiratory support in neonates. Although HHHFNC is widely used in neonates presenting with respiratory distress, the efficiency and safety when compared with nasal continuous positive airway pressure or noninvasive positive pressure ventilation are still controversial. This review aims to evaluate the performance and applications of HHHFNC in neonates.
August 2017: Pediatrics and Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28818610/surfactant-and-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-for-the-prevention-of-chronic-lung-disease-history-reality-and-new-challenges
#10
REVIEW
Hany Aly, Mohamed A Mohamed, Jen-Tien Wung
The discovery of surfactant was one of the most significant research events to occur in the history of neonatology. Certainly, surfactant saved lives for premature infants who were otherwise considered non-viable. However, the prevention of chronic lung disease did not progress and it became clear that a significant portion of the help surfactant provides to the premature lung is counteracted by mechanical ventilation. A dilemma exists over the priorities in premature management to intubate and administer surfactant or not to intubate and support these infants non-invasively with the use of continuous positive airway pressure...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28244292/humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-as-an-initial-respiratory-support-in-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-a-randomized-controlled-non-inferiority-trial
#11
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Jeonghee Shin, Kyuhee Park, Eun Hee Lee, Byung Min Choi
Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress...
April 2017: Journal of Korean Medical Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26869581/high-flow-nasal-cannula-mechanisms-evidence-and-recommendations
#12
REVIEW
Brett J Manley, Louise S Owen
The use of high-flow nasal cannula (HF) therapy as respiratory support for preterm infants is rapidly increasing, due to its perceived ease of use and other potential benefits over the standard 'non-invasive' respiratory support, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The evidence from randomized trials suggests that HF is an alternative to CPAP for post-extubation support of preterm infants. Limited data are available from randomized trials comparing HF with CPAP as primary support, and few trials have included extremely preterm infants...
June 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26906338/high-frequency-ventilation-for-non-invasive-respiratory-support-of-neonates
#13
REVIEW
Bradley A Yoder, K H Albertine, D M Null
Non-invasive respiratory support is increasingly used in lieu of intubated ventilator support for the management of neonatal respiratory failure, particularly in very low birth weight infants at risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The optimal approach and mode for non-invasive support remains uncertain. This article reviews the application of high-frequency ventilation for non-invasive respiratory support in neonates, including basic science studies on mechanics of gas exchange, animal model investigations, and a review of current clinical use in human neonates...
June 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26948884/continuous-positive-airway-pressure-physiology-and-comparison-of-devices
#14
REVIEW
Samir Gupta, Steven M Donn
Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is increasingly used for respiratory support in preterm babies at birth and after extubation from mechanical ventilation. Various CPAP devices are available for use that can be broadly grouped into continuous flow and variable flow. There are potential physiologic differences between these CPAP systems and the choice of a CPAP device is too often guided by individual expertise and experience rather than by evidence. When interpreting the evidence clinicians should take into account the pressure generation sources, nasal interface, and the factors affecting the delivery of pressure, such as mouth position and respiratory drive...
June 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26948885/duration-of-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-in-premature-infants
#15
REVIEW
Nicolas Bamat, Erik A Jensen, Haresh Kirpalani
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used for respiratory support in premature infants for more than 40 years and is now a cornerstone of modern neonatal care. Clinical research on CPAP has primarily focused on understanding which devices and pressure sources best implement this therapy. In contrast, less research has examined the optimal duration over which CPAP is administered. We review this aspect of CPAP therapy.
June 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26923501/physiology-of-non-invasive-respiratory-support
#16
REVIEW
Stamatia Alexiou, Howard B Panitch
Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is used in neonates to treat extrathoracic and intrathoracic airway obstruction, parenchymal lung disease and disorders of control of breathing. Avoidance of airway intubation is associated with a reduction in the incidence of chronic lung disease among preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) may help establish and maintain functional residual capacity (FRC), decrease respiratory work, and improve gas exchange...
June 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27004673/high-flow-nasal-cannula-use-is-associated-with-increased-morbidity-and-length-of-hospitalization-in-extremely-low-birth-weight-infants
#17
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Dalal K Taha, Michael Kornhauser, Jay S Greenspan, Kevin C Dysart, Zubair H Aghai
OBJECTIVE: To determine differences in the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death in extremely low birth weight infants managed on high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) vs continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective data analysis from the Alere Neonatal Database for infants born between January 2008 and July 2013, weighing ≤1000 g at birth, and received HFNC or CPAP. Baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, and neonatal outcomes were compared between the infants who received CPAP and HFNC, or HFNC ± CPAP...
June 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27220537/heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-for-weaning-from-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-in-preterm-infants-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#18
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Sasivimon Soonsawad, Numtip Tongsawang, Pracha Nuntnarumit
BACKGROUND: Heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) therapy has been widely used in preterm infants. However, evidence to support its use as a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) weaning method is still controversial. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to compare time to wean directly off CPAP vs. weaning by using HHHFNC. METHODS: Infants with a gestational age (GA) of <32 weeks who met the predefined criteria for weaning off CPAP, i...
2016: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27354382/non-invasive-high-frequency-oscillatory-ventilation-in-neonates-review-of-physiology-biology-and-clinical-data
#19
Daniele De Luca, Valentina Dell'Orto
Non-invasive high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (NHFOV) consists of the application of a bias flow generating a continuous distending positive pressure with superimposed oscillations, which have constant frequency and active expiratory phase. NHFOV matches together the advantages of high-frequency ventilation (no need for synchronisation, high efficacy in removing CO2 ) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (non-invasive interface, increase in functional residual capacity allowing oxygenation to improve)...
June 28, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28672094/noninvasive-high-frequency-oscillatory-ventilation-versus-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-in-preterm-infants-with-moderate-severe-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-preliminary-report
#20
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Xing-Wang Zhu, Jin-Ning Zhao, Shi-Fang Tang, Jun Yan, Yuan Shi
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of noninvasive high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (nHFOV) with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in preterm infants with moderate-severe respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) after surfactant administration via INSURE (intubation, surfactant, extubation) method on the need for invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). METHODS: A total of 81 infants with a gestational age (GA) of 28-34 weeks were eligible and were randomized to nCPAP (n = 42) or to nHFOV (n = 39)...
August 2017: Pediatric Pulmonology
label_collection
label_collection
7618
1
2
2017-08-19 18:23:58
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"