Read by QxMD icon Read

Executive function and freezing in Parkinson's

shared collection
228 papers 0 to 25 followers A collection featuring papers on executive or attentional deficits in Parkinson's freezing of gait. Also featured are relevant articles on executive function in falling/postural control, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), and the effect of Parkinson's treatments on deficits.
Mattia Arlotti, Sara Marceglia, Guglielmo Foffani, Jens Volkmann, Andres M Lozano, Elena Moro, Filippo Cogiamanian, Marco Prenassi, Tommaso Bocci, Francesca Cortese, Paolo Rampini, Sergio Barbieri, Alberto Priori
OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility and clinical efficacy of local field potentials (LFPs)-based adaptive deep brain stimulation (aDBS) in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) during daily activities in an open-label, nonblinded study. METHODS: We monitored neurophysiologic and clinical fluctuations during 2 perioperative experimental sessions lasting for up to 8 hours. On the first day, the patient took his/her daily medication, while on the second, he/she additionally underwent subthalamic nucleus aDBS driven by LFPs beta band power...
February 14, 2018: Neurology
X A Perez, T Bordia, M Quik
Cholinergic signaling plays a key role in regulating striatal function. The principal source of acetylcholine in the striatum is the cholinergic interneurons which, although low in number, densely arborize to modulate striatal neurotransmission. This modulation occurs via strategically positioned nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors that influence striatal dopamine, GABA and other neurotransmitter release. Cholinergic interneurons integrate multiple striatal synaptic inputs and outputs to regulate motor activity under normal physiological conditions...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Neural Transmission
Sakari Leino, Sini K Koski, Saara Rannanpää, Outi Salminen
The treatment of Parkinson's disease is often complicated by levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID), and antidyskinetic treatment options are currently sparse. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been suggested as potential targets for treatment of LID, as nicotinic agonists have been reported to alleviate LID in animal models. We aimed at the first independent replication of an antidyskinetic effect by nicotine using a mouse model of LID, and at investigation of its mechanisms by studying the release of [3 H]dopamine from synaptosomes prepared from the dorsal and ventral striatum...
February 20, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
Jeongjin Kim, Daesoo Kim
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating disorder resulting from loss of dopamine neurons. In dopamine deficient state, the basal ganglia increases inhibitory synaptic outputs to the thalamus. This increased inhibition by the basal ganglia output is known to reduce firing rate of thalamic neurons that relay motor signals to the motor cortex. This 'rate model' suggests that the reduced excitability of thalamic neurons is the key for inducing motor abnormalities in PD patients. We reveal that in response to inhibition, thalamic neurons generate rebound firing at the end of inhibition...
January 2018: BMB Reports
Roxanne Lofredi, Wolf-Julian Neumann, Antje Bock, Andreas Horn, Julius Huebl, Sandy Siegert, Gerd-Helge Schneider, Joachim K Krauss, Andrea A Kühn
Gamma synchronization increases during movement and scales with kinematic parameters. Here, disease-specific characteristics of this synchronization and the dopamine-dependence of its scaling in Parkinson's disease are investigated. In 16 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery, movements of different velocities revealed that subthalamic gamma power peaked in the sensorimotor part of the subthalamic nucleus, correlated positively with maximal velocity and negatively with symptom severity. These effects relied on movement-related bursts of transient synchrony in the gamma band...
February 1, 2018: ELife
Joaquim Alves da Silva, Fatuel Tecuapetla, Vitor Paixão, Rui M Costa
Deciding when and whether to move is critical for survival. Loss of dopamine neurons (DANs) of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in patients with Parkinson's disease causes deficits in movement initiation and slowness of movement. The role of DANs in self-paced movement has mostly been attributed to their tonic activity, whereas phasic changes in DAN activity have been linked to reward prediction. This model has recently been challenged by studies showing transient changes in DAN activity before or during self-paced movement initiation...
February 8, 2018: Nature
Seok Jong Chung, Han Soo Yoo, Jungsu S Oh, Jae Seung Kim, Byoung Seok Ye, Young H Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee
INTRODUCTION: To investigate the relationship between the sub-regional pattern of striatal dopamine depletion and cognitive impairment in early-stage Parkinson's disease (PD), and determine the effect of striatal dopamine density on cognitive prognosis. METHODS: Patients with drug-naïve non-demented PD were divided into mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI; n = 129) and cognitively normal (PD-CogN; n = 182) groups. Using quantification of the dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in each striatal sub-region with18 F-FP-CIT PET scans, we performed inter-group comparative analysis of DAT availability and multivariate linear regression analysis to assess the association between DAT availability and cognitive performance...
March 2, 2018: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
Shu-Hong Jia, Kai Li, Wen Su, Shu-Hua Li, Hai-Bo Chen
Objective: Patients with Parkinson's disease have prospective memory impairments. However, little is known about distinct phases of prospective memory in these patients. This study was designed to elucidate the specific phase(s) of prospective memory that are impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease. Methods: The study included 31 Parkinson's disease patients and 27 healthy controls. The four phases of prospective memory (intention formation, retention, initiation, and execution) were examined in a complex prospective memory task...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Ryul Kim, Joongyub Lee, Yoon Kim, Aryun Kim, Mihee Jang, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon, Un Jung Kang, Stanley Fahn
INTRODUCTION: The current study was designed to determine whether the degree of presynaptic striatal dopamine depletion can predict the later development of freezing of gait (FOG) in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 390 de novo patients with PD without FOG at baseline. The participants were divided into tertiles according to the baseline dopamine transporter (DAT) uptake of each striatal subregion, and the cumulative risk of FOG was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method...
February 28, 2018: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
Chuyi Huang, Heling Chu, Yan Zhang, Xiaoping Wang
Freezing of gait (FOG) is a gait disorder featured by recurrent episodes of temporary gait halting and mainly found in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). FOG has a severe impact on the quality of life of patients with PD. The pathogenesis of FOG is unclear and considered to be related to several brain areas and neural circuits. Its close connection with cognitive disorder has been proposed and some researchers explain the pathogenesis using the cognitive model theory. FOG occurs concurrently with cognitive disorder in some PD patients, who are poorly responsive to medication therapy...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Moran Gilat, Kaylena A Ehgoetz Martens, Oscar Miranda-Domínguez, Ishu Arpan, James M Shine, Martina Mancini, Damien A Fair, Simon J G Lewis, Fay B Horak
Freezing of gait (FOG) is a poorly understood symptom affecting many patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite growing evidence of a behavioral link between anxiety, attention and FOG in PD, no research to date has investigated the neural mechanisms that might explain this relationship. The present study therefore examined resting-state MRI functional connectivity between the amygdala, striatum and frontoparietal attentional control network in PD patients with (freezers: n = 19) and without FOG (non-freezers: n = 21) in the dopaminergic 'off' state...
January 31, 2018: Neuroscience
Sonia Marcone, Jean-François Gagnon, Catherine Desjardins, Annie-Claude David, Ronald B Postuma, Jacques Montplaisir, Sven Joubert, Isabelle Rouleau
OBJECTIVE: The ability to execute delayed intentions, known as prospective memory (PM), is crucial to everyday living. PM failures are reported in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Parkinson's disease, however, no study to date has investigated PM functioning in individuals at high risk of developing these conditions, precisely those diagnosed with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD). We aimed to assess PM in iRBD according to patients' cognitive status and to determine the underlying nature of their difficulties...
February 7, 2018: Clinical Neuropsychologist
Cettina Allone, Viviana Lo Buono, Francesco Corallo, Lilla Bonanno, Rosanna Palmeri, Giuseppe Di Lorenzo, Angela Marra, Placido Bramanti, Silvia Marino
AIM: Cognitive impairment is present in several neurodegenerative disorders. The clock-drawing test (CDT) represents a useful screening instrument for assessing the evolution of cognitive decline. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of the CDT in monitoring and differentiating the evolution of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's dementia (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), and Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: This study involved 139 patients, including 39 patients with PD and mild cognitive impairment, 16 demented PD patients, 21 VaD patients with mild cognitive impairment, 17 patients with VaD, 33 patients with mild cognitive impairment due to AD, and 13 patients with probable AD...
March 2018: Psychogeriatrics: the Official Journal of the Japanese Psychogeriatric Society
Laura Alonso-Recio, Pilar Martín-Plasencia, Miguel Ruiz, Juan Manuel Serrano
INTRODUCTION: Cognitive impairments are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients without dementia. These deficits are quite heterogeneous, which makes it difficult to recognize and treat them. For this reason, many authors have attempted to classify patients into more homogeneous groups with diverse results. The present study was designed to analyze the cognitive heterogeneity in PD patients using a novel data-driven approach, latent profile analysis (LPA), to classify patients according to cognitive characteristics...
February 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Peter Manza, Guy Schwartz, Mala Masson, Sarah Kann, Nora D Volkow, Chiang-Shan R Li, Hoi-Chung Leung
Dopaminergic medications improve the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), but their effect on response inhibition, a critical executive function, remains unclear. Previous studies primarily enrolled patients in more advanced stages of PD, when dopaminergic medication loses efficacy, and patients were typically on multiple medications. Here, we recruited 21 patients in early-stage PD on levodopa monotherapy and 37 age-matched controls to perform the stop-signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging...
February 10, 2018: Neurobiology of Aging
Moria Dagan, Talia Herman, Rachel Harrison, Junhong Zhou, Nir Giladi, Giulio Ruffini, Brad Manor, Jeffrey M Hausdorff
BACKGROUND: Recent findings suggest that transcranial direct current stimulation of the primary motor cortex may ameliorate freezing of gait. However, the effects of multitarget simultaneous stimulation of motor and cognitive networks are mostly unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of multitarget transcranial direct current stimulation of the primary motor cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on freezing of gait and related outcomes. METHODS: Twenty patients with Parkinson's disease and freezing of gait received 20 minutes of transcranial direct current stimulation on 3 separate visits...
February 13, 2018: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
Michael Adamaszek, Federico D'Agata, Christopher J Steele, Bernhard Sehm, Cornelia Schoppe, Karl Strecker, Hartwig Woldag, Horst Hummelsheim, Ken C Kirkby
Introduction Research indicates that widespread cortical-subcortical networks are involved in the recognition and discrimination of emotional contents of facial and vocal expression. The cerebellum and basal ganglia are two subcortical regions implicated in these networks but evidence as to their specific contributions is limited. To investigate this we compared patients with circumscribed cerebellar lesions and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) on a range of neuropsychological measures, we studied subjects of both clinical entities by an approved test battery...
January 29, 2018: Social Neuroscience
Hua Wang, Tessandra Stewart, Jon B Toledo, Carmen Ginghina, Lu Tang, Anzari Atik, Patrick Aro, Leslie M Shaw, John Q Trojanowski, Douglas R Galasko, Steven Edland, Poul H Jensen, Min Shi, Jing Zhang
Alzheimer's disease (AD) features a dynamic sequence of amyloid deposition, neurodegeneration, and cognitive impairment. A significant fraction of AD brains also displays Lewy body pathology, suggesting that addition of classically Parkinson's disease-related proteins to the AD biomarker panel may be of value. To determine whether addition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total α-synuclein and its form phosphorylated at S129 (pS129) to the AD biomarker panel [Amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ42), tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau181)] improves its performance, we examined CSF samples collected longitudinally up to 7 years as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Giovanna Lagravinese, Elisa Pelosin, Gaia Bonassi, Federico Carbone, Giovanni Abbruzzese, Laura Avanzino
BACKGROUND: Freezing of gait is a symptom that affects more than 50% of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and increasing evidence suggests that nonmotor systems (i.e., limbic system) are involved in its underlying mechanisms. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate whether gait initiation characteristics are influenced by emotional stimuli in patients with PD, with or without freezing of gait. METHODS: A total of 44 participants, divided into 3 groups (15 PD patients with and 15 PD patients without freezing of gait and 14 controls), stood on a sensorized mat and were asked to take a step forward in response to a pleasant image and a step backward in response to an unpleasant one (congruent task, low cognitive load) or to take a step backward in response to a pleasant image and a step forward in response to an unpleasant one (incongruent task, high cognitive load)...
February 2, 2018: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
E Garcia-Rill, S Mahaffey, James R Hyde, F J Urbano
Maintained gamma band activity is a key element of higher brain function, participating in perception, executive function, and memory. The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), as part of the reticular activating system (RAS), is a major source of the "bottom-up" flow of gamma activity to higher regions. However, interruption of gamma band activity is associated with a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review will focus on the role of the PPN in activating higher regions to induce arousal and descending pathways to modulate posture and locomotion...
January 15, 2018: Neurobiology of Disease
2018-01-26 17:05:57
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"