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Internal Medicine

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27 papers 25 to 100 followers
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Marc P Bonaca, Shinya Goto, Deepak L Bhatt, P Gabriel Steg, Robert F Storey, Marc Cohen, Erica Goodrich, Laura Mauri, Ton Oude Ophuis, Mikhail Ruda, Jindřich Špinar, Ki-Bae Seung, Dayi Hu, Anthony J Dalby, Eva Jensen, Peter Held, David A Morrow, Eugene Braunwald, Marc S Sabatine
BACKGROUND: In the PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial (Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared to Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 54), ticagrelor reduced the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events when added to low-dose aspirin in stable patients with prior myocardial infarction, resulting in the approval of ticagrelor 60 mg twice daily for long-term secondary prevention. We investigated the incidence of stroke, outcomes after stroke, and the efficacy of ticagrelor focusing on the approved 60 mg twice daily dose for reducing stroke in this population...
September 20, 2016: Circulation
Davide Capodanno, Dominick J Angiolillo
Daily administration of low-dose of aspirin has proven to be beneficial in preventing recurrent cardiovascular events. However, the role of aspirin for primary prevention in patients with no overt cardiovascular disease is more controversial. In fact, in lower risk patients, the modest benefit in reducing serious vascular events can be offset by the increased risk of bleeding, including intracranial and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been associated with a substantially increased risk of both first and recurrent atherothrombotic events, which makes aspirin therapy of potential value in these subjects...
October 11, 2016: Circulation
James D Chalmers
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: European Respiratory Journal: Official Journal of the European Society for Clinical Respiratory Physiology
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 21, 2016: European Heart Journal
J E Cannon, J Pepke-Zaba
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2016: Heart: Official Journal of the British Cardiac Society
Marlies Ostermann, Michael Joannidis
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with serious short- and long-term complications. Early diagnosis and identification of the underlying aetiology are essential to guide management. In this review, we outline the current definition of AKI and the potential pitfalls, and summarise the existing and future tools to investigate AKI in critically ill patients.
September 27, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Eduard Shantsila, Gregory Yh Lip
BACKGROUND: Morbidity in patients with chronic heart failure is high, and this predisposes them to thrombotic complications, including stroke and thromboembolism, which in turn contribute to high mortality. Oral anticoagulants (e.g. warfarin) and antiplatelet agents (e.g. aspirin) are the principle oral antithrombotic agents. Many heart failure patients with sinus rhythm take aspirin because coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure. Oral anticoagulants have become a standard in the management of heart failure with atrial fibrillation...
September 15, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Pardeep S Jhund, John J V McMurray
Inhibition of neurohumoural pathways such as the renin angiotensin aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems is central to the understanding and treatment of heart failure (HF). Conversely, until recently, potentially beneficial augmentation of neurohumoural systems such as the natriuretic peptides has had limited therapeutic success. Administration of synthetic natriuretic peptides has not improved outcomes in acute HF but modulation of the natriuretic system through inhibition of the enzyme that degrades natriuretic (and other vasoactive) peptides, neprilysin, has proven to be successful...
September 1, 2016: Heart: Official Journal of the British Cardiac Society
Jason Phua, Nathan C Dean, Qi Guo, Win Sen Kuan, Hui Fang Lim, Tow Keang Lim
Mortality rates for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) range from 17 to 48 % in published studies.In this review, we searched PubMed for relevant papers published between 1981 and June 2016 and relevant files. We explored how early and aggressive management measures, implemented within 24 hours of recognition of severe CAP and carried out both in the emergency department and in the ICU, decrease mortality in severe CAP.These measures begin with the use of severity assessment tools and the application of care bundles via clinical decision support tools...
August 28, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
V Koenig-Oberhuber, M Filipovic
In our daily anaesthetic practice, we are confronted with an increasing number of patients treated with either antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents. During the last decade, changes have occurred that make the handling of antithrombotic medication a challenging part of anaesthetic perioperative management. In this review, the authors discuss the most important antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, the perioperative management, the handling of bleeding complications, and the interpretation of some laboratory analyses related to these agents...
September 2016: British Journal of Anaesthesia
Alberico L Catapano, Ian Graham, Guy De Backer, Olov Wiklund, M John Chapman, Heinz Drexel, Arno W Hoes, Catriona S Jennings, Ulf Landmesser, Terje R Pedersen, Željko Reiner, Gabriele Riccardi, Marja-Riita Taskinen, Lale Tokgozoglu, W M Monique Verschuren, Charalambos Vlachopoulos, David A Wood, Jose Luis Zamorano
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 27, 2016: European Heart Journal
Jonathan P Piccini, Laurent Fauchier
Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status...
August 20, 2016: Lancet
Roberto Ferrari, Kim Fox
Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT...
August 2016: Nature Reviews. Cardiology
Andre C Kalil, Mark L Metersky, Michael Klompas, John Muscedere, Daniel A Sweeney, Lucy B Palmer, Lena M Napolitano, Naomi P O'Grady, John G Bartlett, Jordi Carratalà, Ali A El Solh, Santiago Ewig, Paul D Fey, Thomas M File, Marcos I Restrepo, Jason A Roberts, Grant W Waterer, Peggy Cruse, Shandra L Knight, Jan L Brozek
It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia...
September 1, 2016: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Adam J Singer, Jim Xiang, Christopher Kabrhel, Gino J Merli, Charles Pollack, Victor F Tapson, Peter Wildgoose, W Frank Peacock
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Traditionally, patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) are admitted from the emergency department and treated with low molecular weight heparin followed by warfarin. Several studies now demonstrate that it is possible to identify low-risk PE patients that can safely be treated as outpatients. The advent of the direct-acting oral anticoagulants such as rivaroxaban has made it easier than ever to manage patients outside of the hospital. This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial aimed at testing the hypothesis that low-risk PE patients can be safely and effectively managed at home using rivaroxaban, resulting in fewer days of hospitalization than standard of care treatment...
August 18, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Grant W Reed, Jeffrey E Rossi, Christopher P Cannon
Acute myocardial infarction has traditionally been divided into ST elevation or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction; however, therapies are similar between the two, and the overall management of acute myocardial infarction can be reviewed for simplicity. Acute myocardial infarction remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite substantial improvements in prognosis over the past decade. The progress is a result of several major trends, including improvements in risk stratification, more widespread use of an invasive strategy, implementation of care delivery systems prioritising immediate revascularisation through percutaneous coronary intervention (or fibrinolysis), advances in antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and greater use of secondary prevention strategies such as statins...
August 5, 2016: Lancet
Hiddo J L Heerspink, Bruce A Perkins, David H Fitchett, Mansoor Husain, David Z I Cherney
Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, including empagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and canagliflozin, are now widely approved antihyperglycemic therapies. Because of their unique glycosuric mechanism, SGLT2 inhibitors also reduce weight. Perhaps more important are the osmotic diuretic and natriuretic effects contributing to plasma volume contraction, and decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressures by 4 to 6 and 1 to 2 mm Hg, respectively, which may underlie cardiovascular and kidney benefits...
September 6, 2016: Circulation
William D Phillips, Angela Vincent
Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) caused by antibodies that attack components of the postsynaptic membrane, impair neuromuscular transmission, and lead to weakness and fatigue of skeletal muscle. This can be generalised or localised to certain muscle groups, and involvement of the bulbar and respiratory muscles can be life threatening. The pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis depends upon the target and isotype of the autoantibodies. Most cases are caused by immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and IgG3 antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR)...
2016: F1000Research
Sumeet Reddy, Laurence Weinberg, Paul Young
This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency medicine 2016. Other selected articles can be found online at Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from
2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
2016-08-13 15:01:36
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