collection
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Emergency Medicine to go

shared collection
12 papers 0 to 25 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19318384/intensive-versus-conventional-glucose-control-in-critically-ill-patients
#1
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Simon Finfer, Dean R Chittock, Steve Yu-Shuo Su, Deborah Blair, Denise Foster, Vinay Dhingra, Rinaldo Bellomo, Deborah Cook, Peter Dodek, William R Henderson, Paul C Hébert, Stephane Heritier, Daren K Heyland, Colin McArthur, Ellen McDonald, Imogen Mitchell, John A Myburgh, Robyn Norton, Julie Potter, Bruce G Robinson, Juan J Ronco
BACKGROUND: The optimal target range for blood glucose in critically ill patients remains unclear. METHODS: Within 24 hours after admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), adults who were expected to require treatment in the ICU on 3 or more consecutive days were randomly assigned to undergo either intensive glucose control, with a target blood glucose range of 81 to 108 mg per deciliter (4.5 to 6.0 mmol per liter), or conventional glucose control, with a target of 180 mg or less per deciliter (10...
March 26, 2009: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394330/findings-from-12-lead-electrocardiography-that-predict-circulatory-shock-from-pulmonary-embolism-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#2
REVIEW
Jacob D Shopp, Lauren K Stewart, Thomas W Emmett, Jeffrey A Kline
OBJECTIVES: Treatment guidelines for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) recommend risk stratifying patients to assess PE severity, as those at higher risk should be considered for therapy in addition to standard anticoagulation to prevent right ventricular (RV) failure, which can cause hemodynamic collapse. The hypothesis was that 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) can aid in this determination. The objective of this study was to measure the prognostic value of specific ECG findings (the Daniel score, which includes heart rate > 100 beats/min, presence of the S1Q3T3 pattern, incomplete and complete right bundle branch block [RBBB], and T-wave inversion in leads V1-V4, plus ST elevation in lead aVR and atrial fibrillation suggestive of RV strain from acute pulmonary hypertension), in patients with acute PE...
October 2015: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26292077/ketamine-propofol-versus-propofol-alone-for-procedural-sedation-in-the-emergency-department-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#3
REVIEW
Justin W Yan, Shelley L McLeod, Alla Iansavitchene
OBJECTIVES: Propofol is an agent commonly used for procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) in the emergency department (ED), but it can cause respiratory depression and hypotension. The combination of ketamine-propofol (K-P) is an alternative that theoretically provides a reduction in adverse events compared to propofol. The primary objective of this review was to determine if K-P has a lower frequency of adverse respiratory events in patients undergoing PSA in the ED than propofol alone...
September 2015: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26342901/pulmonary-hypertension-and-right-ventricular-failure-in-emergency-medicine
#4
REVIEW
Susan R Wilcox, Christopher Kabrhel, Richard N Channick
Pulmonary hypertension is a hemodynamic condition, defined as a mean pulmonary artery pressure by right-sided heart catheterization of at least 25 mm Hg at rest. It is classified into 5 general groups based on the underlying cause, with left ventricular failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being 2 of the most common causes in the United States. Although the specifics of the pathophysiology will vary with the cause, appreciating the risks of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure is critical to appropriately evaluating and resuscitating pulmonary hypertension patients in the emergency department (ED)...
December 2015: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26320523/diphenhydramine-as-adjuvant-therapy-for-acute-migraine-an-emergency-department-based-randomized-clinical-trial
#5
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Benjamin W Friedman, Lisa Cabral, Victoria Adewunmi, Clemencia Solorzano, David Esses, Polly E Bijur, E John Gallagher
STUDY OBJECTIVE: More than 1 million patients present to US emergency departments (EDs) annually seeking care for acute migraine. Parenteral antihistamines have long been used in combination with antidopaminergics such as metoclopramide to treat acute migraine in the ED. High-quality data supporting this practice do not exist. We determine whether administration of diphenhydramine 50 mg intravenously+metoclopramide 10 mg intravenously results in greater rates of sustained headache relief than placebo+metoclopramide 10 mg intravenously...
January 2016: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26323041/double-blind-prospective-randomized-controlled-trial-of-dopamine-versus-epinephrine-as-first-line-vasoactive-drugs-in-pediatric-septic-shock
#6
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Andréa M C Ventura, Huei Hsin Shieh, Albert Bousso, Patrícia F Góes, Iracema de Cássia F O Fernandes, Daniela C de Souza, Rodrigo Locatelli Pedro Paulo, Fabiana Chagas, Alfredo E Gilio
OBJECTIVES: The primary outcome was to compare the effects of dopamine or epinephrine in severe sepsis on 28-day mortality; secondary outcomes were the rate of healthcare-associated infection, the need for other vasoactive drugs, and the multiple organ dysfunction score. DESIGN: Double-blind, prospective, randomized controlled trial from February 1, 2009, to July 31, 2013. SETTING: PICU, Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil...
November 2015: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22429969/dynamic-effects-of-adrenaline-epinephrine-in-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-with-initial-pulseless-electrical-activity-pea
#7
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Trond Nordseth, Theresa Mariero Olasveengen, Jan Terje Kvaløy, Lars Wik, Petter Andreas Steen, Eirik Skogvoll
BACKGROUND: In cardiac arrest, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) is a challenging clinical syndrome. In a randomized study comparing intravenous (i.v.) access and drugs versus no i.v. access or drugs during advanced life support (ALS), adrenaline (epinephrine) improved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in patients with PEA. Originating from this study, we investigated the time-dependent effects of adrenaline on clinical state transitions in patients with initial PEA, using a non-parametric multi-state statistical model...
August 2012: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26550795/trial-of-continuous-or-interrupted-chest-compressions-during-cpr
#8
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Graham Nichol, Brian Leroux, Henry Wang, Clifton W Callaway, George Sopko, Myron Weisfeldt, Ian Stiell, Laurie J Morrison, Tom P Aufderheide, Sheldon Cheskes, Jim Christenson, Peter Kudenchuk, Christian Vaillancourt, Thomas D Rea, Ahamed H Idris, Riccardo Colella, Marshal Isaacs, Ron Straight, Shannon Stephens, Joe Richardson, Joe Condle, Robert H Schmicker, Debra Egan, Susanne May, Joseph P Ornato
BACKGROUND: During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the interruption of manual chest compressions for rescue breathing reduces blood flow and possibly survival. We assessed whether outcomes after continuous compressions with positive-pressure ventilation differed from those after compressions that were interrupted for ventilations at a ratio of 30 compressions to two ventilations. METHODS: This cluster-randomized trial with crossover included 114 emergency medical service (EMS) agencies...
December 3, 2015: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25435406/endotracheal-tube-assisted-orogastric-tube-insertion-in-intubated-patients-in-an-ed
#9
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Oh Sung Kwon, Gyu Chong Cho, Choong Hyun Jo, Young Suk Cho
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inserting a nasogastric tube (NGT) in intubated patients may be difficult because they cannot follow swallowing instructions, resulting in a high rate of first-attempt failure. We introduce a simple technique for inserting an orogastric tube in an emergency department (ED). METHODS: Fifty-six patients in the ED, who were intubated and required NGT insertion, were randomly allocated to 2 groups. We inserted the NGT using a conventional technique from the nostril (control group) and an endotracheal tube (ET)-assisted technique from the mouth (ET group)...
February 2015: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26237037/vasopressors-for-the-treatment-of-septic-shock-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#10
REVIEW
Tomer Avni, Adi Lador, Shaul Lev, Leonard Leibovici, Mical Paul, Alon Grossman
OBJECTIVE: International guidelines recommend dopamine or norepinephrine as first-line vasopressor agents in septic shock. Phenylephrine, epinephrine, vasopressin and terlipressin are considered second-line agents. Our objective was to assess the evidence for the efficiency and safety of all vasopressors in septic shock. METHODS: Systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched electronic database of MEDLINE, CENTRAL, LILACS and conference proceedings up to June 2014...
2015: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26866753/head-elevated-patient-positioning-decreases-complications-of-emergent-tracheal-intubation-in-the-ward-and-intensive-care-unit
#11
MULTICENTER STUDY
Nita Khandelwal, Sarah Khorsand, Steven H Mitchell, Aaron M Joffe
BACKGROUND: Based on the data from elective surgical patients, positioning patients in a back-up head-elevated position for preoxygenation and tracheal intubation can improve patient safety. However, data specific to the emergent setting are lacking. We hypothesized that back-up head-elevated positioning would be associated with a decrease in complications related to tracheal intubation in the emergency room environment. METHODS: This retrospective study was approved by the University of Washington Human Subjects Division (Seattle, WA)...
April 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21762234/electrocardiogram-findings-in-emergency-department-patients-with-syncope
#12
James Quinn, Daniel McDermott
OBJECTIVES: To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the San Francisco Syncope Rule (SFSR) electrocardiogram (ECG) criteria for determining cardiac outcomes and to define the specific ECG findings that are the most important in patients with syncope. METHODS: A consecutive cohort of emergency department (ED) patients with syncope or near syncope was considered. The treating emergency physicians assessed 50 predictor variables, including an ECG and rhythm assessment...
July 2011: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
1
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"