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By Akhilesh Tiwari Dual trainee (Anaesthesia and Intensive Care)
Scott C Watkins, Andrew D Shaw
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The past decade has seen more advances in our understanding of fluid therapy than the preceding decades combined. What was once thought to be a relatively benign panacea is increasingly being recognized as a potent pharmacological and physiological intervention that may pose as much harm as benefit. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have clearly indicated that the amount, type, and timing of fluid administration have profound effects on patient morbidity and outcomes...
September 29, 2016: Current Opinion in Critical Care
Mauro Neri, Gianluca Villa, Francesco Garzotto, Sean Bagshaw, Rinaldo Bellomo, Jorge Cerda, Fiorenza Ferrari, Silvia Guggia, Michael Joannidis, John Kellum, Jeong Chul Kim, Ravindra L Mehta, Zaccaria Ricci, Alberto Trevisani, Silvio Marafon, William R Clark, Jean-Louis Vincent, Claudio Ronco
This article reports the conclusions of a consensus expert conference on the basic principles and nomenclature of renal replacement therapy (RRT) currently utilized to manage acute kidney injury (AKI). This multidisciplinary consensus conference discusses common definitions, components, techniques, and operations of the machines and platforms used to deliver extracorporeal therapies, utilizing a "machine-centric" rather than a "patient-centric" approach. We provide a detailed description of the performance characteristics of membranes, filters, transmembrane transport of solutes and fluid, flows, and methods of measurement of delivered treatment, focusing on continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) which are utilized in the management of critically ill patients with AKI...
October 10, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Jason Phua, Nathan C Dean, Qi Guo, Win Sen Kuan, Hui Fang Lim, Tow Keang Lim
Mortality rates for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) range from 17 to 48 % in published studies.In this review, we searched PubMed for relevant papers published between 1981 and June 2016 and relevant files. We explored how early and aggressive management measures, implemented within 24 hours of recognition of severe CAP and carried out both in the emergency department and in the ICU, decrease mortality in severe CAP.These measures begin with the use of severity assessment tools and the application of care bundles via clinical decision support tools...
August 28, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Srijita Sen-Chowdhry, Daniel Jacoby, James C Moon, William J McKenna
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited cardiovascular disorder, affecting 1 in 500 individuals worldwide. Existing epidemiological studies might have underestimated the prevalence of HCM, however, owing to limited inclusion of individuals with early, incomplete phenotypic expression. Clinical manifestations of HCM include diastolic dysfunction, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, ischaemia, atrial fibrillation, abnormal vascular responses and, in 5% of patients, progression to a 'burnt-out' phase characterized by systolic impairment...
November 2016: Nature Reviews. Cardiology
Elena Prina, Adrian Ceccato, Antoni Torres
Despite improvements in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), morbidity and mortality are still high, especially in patients with more severe disease. Early and appropriate antibiotics remain the cornerstone in the treatment of CAP. However, two aspects seem to contribute to a worse outcome: an uncontrolled inflammatory reaction and an inadequate immune response. Adjuvant treatments, such as corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins, have been proposed to counterbalance these effects. The use of corticosteroids in patients with severe CAP and a strong inflammatory reaction can reduce the time to clinical stability, the risk of treatment failure, and the risk of progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome...
October 1, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Jayesh Dhanani, John F Fraser, Hak-Kim Chan, Jordi Rello, Jeremy Cohen, Jason A Roberts
Drug dosing in critically ill patients is challenging due to the altered drug pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics associated with systemic therapies. For many drug therapies, there is potential to use the respiratory system as an alternative route for drug delivery. Aerosol drug delivery can provide many advantages over conventional therapy. Given that respiratory diseases are the commonest causes of critical illness, use of aerosol therapy to provide high local drug concentrations with minimal systemic side effects makes this route an attractive option...
October 7, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Nancy Carney, Annette M Totten, Cindy OʼReilly, Jamie S Ullman, Gregory W J Hawryluk, Michael J Bell, Susan L Bratton, Randall Chesnut, Odette A Harris, Niranjan Kissoon, Andres M Rubiano, Lori Shutter, Robert C Tasker, Monica S Vavilala, Jack Wilberger, David W Wright, Jamshid Ghajar
: The scope and purpose of this work is 2-fold: to synthesize the available evidence and to translate it into recommendations. This document provides recommendations only when there is evidence to support them. As such, they do not constitute a complete protocol for clinical use. Our intention is that these recommendations be used by others to develop treatment protocols, which necessarily need to incorporate consensus and clinical judgment in areas where current evidence is lacking or insufficient...
September 20, 2016: Neurosurgery
Hernando Gómez, John A Kellum
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sepsis is a common and frequently fatal condition in which mortality has been consistently linked to increasing organ dysfunction. For example, acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 40-50% of septic patients and increases mortality six to eight-fold. However, the mechanisms by which sepsis causes organ dysfunction are not well understood and hence current therapy remains reactive and nonspecific. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have challenged the previous notion that organ dysfunction is solely secondary to hypoperfusion, by showing, for example, that AKI occurs in the setting of normal or increased renal blood flow; and that it is characterized not by acute tubular necrosis or apoptosis, but rather by heterogeneous areas of colocalized sluggish peritubular blood flow and tubular epithelial cell oxidative stress...
September 22, 2016: Current Opinion in Critical Care
Marlies Ostermann, Michael Joannidis
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with serious short- and long-term complications. Early diagnosis and identification of the underlying aetiology are essential to guide management. In this review, we outline the current definition of AKI and the potential pitfalls, and summarise the existing and future tools to investigate AKI in critically ill patients.
September 27, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Peter A McCullough, James P Choi, Georges A Feghali, Jeffrey M Schussler, Robert M Stoler, Ravi C Vallabahn, Ankit Mehta
Coronary angiography and percutaneous intervention rely on the use of iodinated intravascular contrast for vessel and chamber imaging. Despite advancements in imaging and interventional techniques, iodinated contrast continues to pose a risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) for a subgroup of patients at risk for this complication. There has been a consistent and graded signal of risk for associated outcomes including need for renal replacement therapy, rehospitalization, and death, according to the incidence and severity of CI-AKI...
September 27, 2016: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Michael R Pinsky
The primary role of the right ventricle (RV) is to deliver all the blood it receives per beat into the pulmonary circulation without causing right atrial pressure to rise. To the extent that it also does not impede left ventricular (LV) filling, cardiac output responsiveness to increased metabolic demand is optimized. Since cardiac output is a function of metabolic demand of the body, during stress and exercise states the flow to the RV can vary widely. Also, instantaneous venous return varies widely for a constant cardiac output as ventilatory efforts alter the dynamic pressure gradient for venous return...
September 10, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
John H Boyd, Demetrios Sirounis, Julien Maizel, Michel Slama
BACKGROUND: In critically ill patients at risk for organ failure, the administration of intravenous fluids has equal chances of resulting in benefit or harm. While the intent of intravenous fluid is to increase cardiac output and oxygen delivery, unwelcome results in those patients who do not increase their cardiac output are tissue edema, hypoxemia, and excess mortality. Here we briefly review bedside methods to assess fluid responsiveness, focusing upon the strengths and pitfalls of echocardiography in spontaneously breathing mechanically ventilated patients as a means to guide fluid management...
September 4, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Daniel J Niven, Kevin B Laupland
Elevation in core body temperature is one of the most frequently detected abnormal signs in patients admitted to adult ICUs, and is associated with increased mortality in select populations of critically ill patients. The definition of an elevated body temperature varies considerably by population and thermometer, and is commonly defined by a temperature of 38.0 °C or greater. Terms such as hyperthermia, pyrexia, and fever are often used interchangeably. However, strictly speaking hyperthermia refers to the elevation in body temperature that occurs without an increase in the hypothalamic set point, such as in response to specific environmental (e...
2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Erin Frazee, Kianoush Kashani
BACKGROUND: Intravenous fluids (IVF) are frequently utilized to restore intravascular volume in patients with distributive and hypovolemic shock. Although the benefits of the appropriate use of fluids in intensive care units (ICUs) and hospitals are well described, there is growing knowledge regarding the potential risks of volume overload and its impact on organ failure and mortality. To avoid volume overload and its associated complications, strategies to identify fluid responsiveness are developed and utilized more often among ICU patients...
June 2016: Kidney Diseases
Anthony S McLean
Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available...
August 20, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Michael Schepke
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2007: Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
Andre C Kalil, Mark L Metersky, Michael Klompas, John Muscedere, Daniel A Sweeney, Lucy B Palmer, Lena M Napolitano, Naomi P O'Grady, John G Bartlett, Jordi Carratalà, Ali A El Solh, Santiago Ewig, Paul D Fey, Thomas M File, Marcos I Restrepo, Jason A Roberts, Grant W Waterer, Peggy Cruse, Shandra L Knight, Jan L Brozek
It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia...
September 1, 2016: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Rolando Claure-Del Granado, Ravindra L Mehta
BACKGROUND: Fluid overload is frequently found in acute kidney injury patients in critical care units. Recent studies have shown the relationship of fluid overload with adverse outcomes; hence, manage and optimization of fluid balance becomes a central component of the management of critically ill patients. DISCUSSION: In critically ill patients, in order to restore cardiac output, systemic blood pressure and renal perfusion an adequate fluid resuscitation is essential...
August 2, 2016: BMC Nephrology
Fernando G Zampieri, Otavio T Ranzani, Luciano Cesar Pontes Azevedo, Izanio D S Martins, John A Kellum, Alexandre B Libório
OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of the percentage of fluid infused as Lactated Ringer (%LR) during the first 2 days of ICU admission in hospital mortality and occurrence of acute kidney injury. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. SETTING: Analysis of a large public database (Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care-II). PATIENTS: Adult patients with at least 2 days of ICU stay, admission creatinine lower than 5 mg/dL, and that received at least 500 mL of fluid in the first 48 hours...
August 5, 2016: Critical Care Medicine
John H Boyd, Demetrios Sirounis
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: It has recently become evident that administration of intravenous fluids following initial resuscitation has a greater probability of producing tissue edema and hypoxemia than of increasing oxygen delivery. Therefore, it is essential to have a rational approach to assess the adequacy of volume resuscitation. Here we review passive leg raising (PLR) and respiratory variation in hemodynamics to assess fluid responsiveness. RECENT FINDINGS: The use of ultrasound enhances the clinician's ability to detect and predict fluid responsiveness, whereas enthusiasm for this modality must be tempered by recent evidence that it is only reliable in apneic patients...
October 2016: Current Opinion in Critical Care
2016-08-14 03:29:55
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