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Jann P Foster, Kim Psaila, Tiffany Patterson
BACKGROUND: Non-nutritive sucking (NNS) is used during gavage feeding and in the transition from gavage to breast/bottle feeding in preterm infants to improve the development of sucking behavior and the digestion of enteral feedings. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of non-nutritive sucking on physiologic stability and nutrition in preterm infants. SEARCH METHODS: We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 25 February 2016), Embase (1980 to 25 February 2016), and CINAHL (1982 to 25 February 2016)...
October 4, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Nor Rosidah Ibrahim, Tan Hooi Kheng, Ariffin Nasir, Noraida Ramli, Jimmy Lee Kok Foo, Sharifah Huda Syed Alwi, Hans Van Rostenberghe
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether feeding with 2-hourly or 3-hourly feeding interval reduces the time to achieve full enteral feeding and to compare their outcome in very low birthweight preterm infants. DESIGN: Parallel-group randomised controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation ratio. SETTING: Two regional tertiary neonatal intensive care units. PATIENTS: 150 preterm infants less than 35 weeks gestation with birth weight between 1...
September 26, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Ali Faraghi Ahrabi, Deepali Handa, Champa N Codipilly, Syed Shah, Janet E Williams, Mark A McGuire, Debra Potak, Grace Golda Aharon, Richard J Schanler
OBJECTIVE: To examine the integrity (pH, bacterial counts, host defense factors, nutrient contents, and osmolality) of freshly expressed and previously refrigerated human milk subjected to long-term freezer storage. STUDY DESIGN: Mothers donated 100 mL of freshly expressed milk. Samples were divided into baseline, storage at -20°C (fresh frozen) for 1, 3, 6, and 9 months, and prior storage at +4°C for 72 hours (refrigerated frozen) before storage at -20°C for 1 to 9 months...
October 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
Mandy B Belfort, Peter J Anderson, Victoria A Nowak, Katherine J Lee, Charlotte Molesworth, Deanne K Thompson, Lex W Doyle, Terrie E Inder
OBJECTIVES: To determine the associations of breast milk intake after birth with neurological outcomes at term equivalent and 7 years of age in very preterm infants STUDY DESIGN: We studied 180 infants born at <30 weeks' gestation or <1250 grams birth weight enrolled in the Victorian Infant Brain Studies cohort from 2001-2003. We calculated the number of days on which infants received >50% of enteral intake as breast milk from 0-28 days of life. Outcomes included brain volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent and 7 years of age, and cognitive (IQ, reading, mathematics, attention, working memory, language, visual perception) and motor testing at 7 years of age...
October 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
Katie Satrom, Glenn Gourley
Cholestasis in preterm infants has a multifactorial etiology. Risk factors include degree of prematurity, lack of enteral feeding, intestinal injury, prolonged use of parenteral nutrition (PN), and sepsis. Soy-based parenteral lipid emulsions have been implicated in the pathophysiology of PN-associated liver injury. Inflammation plays an important role. Medical therapies are used; however, their effects have not consistently proven effective. Evaluation of cholestasis involves laboratory work; direct bilirubin levels are used for diagnosis and trending...
June 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
Jennifer V E Brown, Nicholas D Embleton, Jane E Harding, William McGuire
BACKGROUND: Exclusively breast milk-fed preterm infants may accumulate nutrient deficits leading to extrauterine growth restriction. Feeding preterm infants with multi-nutrient fortified human breast milk rather than unfortified breast milk may increase nutrient accretion and growth rates and may improve neurodevelopmental outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether multi-nutrient fortified human breast milk improves important outcomes (including growth and development) over unfortified breast milk for preterm infants without increasing the risk of adverse effects (such as feed intolerance and necrotising enterocolitis)...
2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Sanket D Shah, Narendra Dereddy, Tamekia L Jones, Ramasubbareddy Dhanireddy, Ajay J Talati
OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of initiating human milk fortification at 2 different feeding volumes on feeding intolerance and the time to reach full feeding volume. STUDY DESIGN: Very low birth weight infants (n = 100) were prospectively randomized to early fortification (EF) (beginning at a feeding volume of 20 mL/kg/d) or delayed fortification (at a feeding volume of 100 mL/kg/d). We employed a standardized feeding protocol and parenteral nutrition guidelines for the nutritional management of all study infants...
July 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
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