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RDS

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8 papers 0 to 25 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540346/less-invasive-surfactant-administration-reduces-the-need-for-mechanical-ventilation-in-preterm-infants-a-meta-analysis
#1
Christine S M Lau, Ronald S Chamberlain, Shyan Sun
Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome due to surfactant deficiency is associated with high morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, and the use of less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) has been increasingly studied. This meta-analysis found that LISA via thin catheter significantly reduced the need for mechanical ventilation within the first 72 hours (relative risk [RR] = 0.677; P = .021), duration of mechanical ventilation (difference in means [MD] = -39.302 hours; P < .001), duration of supplemental oxygen (MD = -68...
2017: Global Pediatric Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073106/surfactant-need-by-gestation-for-very-preterm-babies-initiated-on-early-nasal-cpap-a-danish-observational-multicentre-study-of-6-628-infants-born-2000-2013
#2
Rikke Wiingreen, Gorm Greisen, Finn Ebbesen, Jesper Padkær Petersen, Gitte Zachariassen, Tine Brink Henriksen, Bo Mølholm Hansen
BACKGROUND: In recent years, early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) as respiratory support for preterm infants is being advocated as an alternative to prophylactic surfactant and treatment with mechanical ventilation. A number of infants treated with early nCPAP do not need treatment with surfactant, but few studies provide data on this. Since the 1990s, the first approach to respiratory support to preterm infants in Denmark has been early nCPAP combined with surfactant administration by the INSURE method by which the infant is intubated and surfactant administration is followed by rapid extubation to nCPAP if possible...
2017: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28029185/case-control-study-demonstrates-that-surfactant-without-intubation-delayed-mechanical-ventilation-in-preterm-infants
#3
Sigrid Dannheim Vik, Torstein Vik, Stian Lydersen, Ragnhild Støen
AIM: This Norwegian study explored whether administering surfactant without intubation (SWI) delayed the need for early mechanical ventilation and reduced respiratory and nonrespiratory complications in infants born before 32 weeks of gestational age. METHODS: We compared 262 infants admitted to a level-three neonatal intensive care unit: 134 born before the introduction of SWI on 1 December 2011 were in the control group and 128 infants born after this date were in the study group...
April 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27989413/a-noninvasive-surfactant-adsorption-test-predicting-the-need-for-surfactant-therapy-in-preterm-infants-treated-with-continuous-positive-airway-pressure
#4
Chiara Autilio, Mercedes Echaide, Alexandra Benachi, Anne Marfaing-Koka, Ettore D Capoluongo, Jesús Pérez-Gil, Daniele De Luca
OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the surfactant adsorption test (SAT) as a predictor for the need for surfactant replacement therapy in neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). STUDY DESIGN: Amniotic fluid samples were collected from 41 preterm neonates with RDS treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and 15 healthy control term neonates. Purified porcine surfactant served as a further control. Lamellar bodies and lung ultrasound score were also measured in a subset of the neonates treated with CPAP...
March 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842300/quicksf-a-new-technique-in-surfactant-administration
#5
Christian A Maiwald, Patrick Neuberger, Matthias Vochem, Christian Poets
BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate an increasing use of less invasive surfactant administration. Different techniques have been shown with distinct risks and benefits. The aim of this study was to develop a new method that simplifies this procedure. OBJECTIVES: An applicator was developed and tested on a manikin to make tracheal surfactant application easier and faster. METHODS: A device for oral administration of a catheter into the trachea was developed...
2017: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27649091/european-consensus-guidelines-on-the-management-of-respiratory-distress-syndrome-2016-update
#6
David G Sweet, Virgilio Carnielli, Gorm Greisen, Mikko Hallman, Eren Ozek, Richard Plavka, Ola Didrik Saugstad, Umberto Simeoni, Christian P Speer, Máximo Vento, Gerard H A Visser, Henry L Halliday
Advances in the management of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ensure that clinicians must continue to revise current practice. We report the third update of the European Guidelines for the Management of RDS by a European panel of expert neonatologists including input from an expert perinatal obstetrician based on available literature up to the beginning of 2016. Optimizing the outcome for babies with RDS includes consideration of when to use antenatal steroids, and good obstetric practice includes methods of predicting the risk of preterm delivery and also consideration of whether transfer to a perinatal centre is necessary and safe...
2017: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27120482/surfactant-treatment-threshold-during-ncpap-for-the-treatment-of-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#7
Carlo Dani
Although surfactant is the most studied drug in the preterm infant, the best criteria for treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with surfactant have been not extensively investigated. We assessed the criteria used for deciding the rescue surfactant treatment of preterm infants with RDS in combination with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as reported by the main recent randomized controlled trials. We evaluated 10 studies and found that the criteria chosen for administering selective surfactant were very heterogeneous, different types and doses of surfactant were used, and this limits their applicability in the clinical practice...
August 2016: American Journal of Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26899543/high-flow-nasal-cannula-for-respiratory-support-in-preterm-infants
#8
REVIEW
Dominic Wilkinson, Chad Andersen, Colm P F O'Donnell, Antonio G De Paoli, Brett J Manley
BACKGROUND: High flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) are small, thin, tapered binasal tubes that deliver oxygen or blended oxygen/air at gas flows of more than 1 L/min. HFNC are increasingly being used as a form of non-invasive respiratory support for preterm infants. OBJECTIVES: To compare the safety and efficacy of HFNC with other forms of non-invasive respiratory support in preterm infants. SEARCH METHODS: We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 1 January 2016), EMBASE (1980 to 1 January 2016), and CINAHL (1982 to 1 January 2016)...
February 22, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
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