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Plant-based ways to increase bloodflow: ParuchMD

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3 papers 0 to 25 followers The evidence behind increasing blood flow simply by using nutrition as a tool.
By John Paruch Combined training in Internal Medicine-Psychiatry with holistic, evidence-based, preventive approach to implementation and promotion of wellness.
L A Bazzano, A M Thompson, M T Tees, C H Nguyen, D M Winham
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Studies evaluating the effect of legume consumption on cholesterol have focused on soybeans, however non-soy legumes, such as a variety of beans, peas, and some seeds, are commonly consumed in Western countries. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of non-soy legume consumption on blood lipids. METHODS AND RESULTS: Studies were retrieved by searching MEDLINE (from January 1966 through July 2009), EMBASE (from January 1980 to July 2009), and the Cochrane Collaboration's Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials using the following terms as medical subject headings and keywords: fabaceae not soybeans not isoflavones and diet or dietary fiber and cholesterol or hypercholesterolemia or triglycerides or cardiovascular diseases...
February 2011: Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases: NMCD
Peter Zahradka, Brenda Wright, Wendy Weighell, Heather Blewett, Alanna Baldwin, Karmin O, Randolph P Guzman, Carla G Taylor
OBJECTIVE: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) results from a decrease in blood flow to the limbs due to the presence of atherosclerotic plaque. It has been reported that isoflavones isolated from soybeans reduce arterial stiffness, a component of atherosclerotic disease. This study examined the effect of consuming whole legumes (non-soy) on arterial function in humans with PAD. METHODS: Twenty-six individuals with PAD consumed ½ cup/day cooked legumes (beans, peas, lentils, chickpeas) daily for 8 weeks...
October 2013: Atherosclerosis
Michael Aviram, Mira Rosenblat, Diana Gaitini, Samy Nitecki, Aaron Hoffman, Leslie Dornfeld, Nina Volkova, Dita Presser, Judith Attias, Harley Liker, Tony Hayek
Dietary supplementation with polyphenolic antioxidants to animals was shown to be associated with inhibition of LDL oxidation and macrophage foam cell formation, and attenuation of atherosclerosis development. We investigated the effects of pomegranate juice (PJ, which contains potent tannins and anthocyanins) consumption by atherosclerotic patients with carotid artery stenosis (CAS) on the progression of carotid lesions and changes in oxidative stress and blood pressure. Ten patients were supplemented with PJ for 1 year and five of them continued for up to 3 years...
June 2004: Clinical Nutrition: Official Journal of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
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