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By EFRAIN PAEZ Internal Medicine since 1988. Interested in all aspects of Medicine.
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 15, 2016: American Family Physician
Terese T Horlocker, Denise J Wedel, John C Rowlingson, F Kayser Enneking, Sandra L Kopp, Honorio T Benzon, David L Brown, John A Heit, Michael F Mulroy, Richard W Rosenquist, Michael Tryba, Chun-Su Yuan
The actual incidence of neurologic dysfunction resulting from hemorrhagic complications associated with neuraxial blockade is unknown. Although the incidence cited in the literature is estimated to be less than 1 in 150,000 epidural and less than 1 in 220,000 spinal anesthetics, recent epidemiologic surveys suggest that the frequency is increasing and may be as high as 1 in 3000 in some patient populations.Overall, the risk of clinically significant bleeding increase with age,associated abnormalities of the spinal cord or vertebral column, the presence of an underlying coagulopathy, difficulty during needle placement,and an indwelling neuraxial catheter during sustained anticoagulation( particularly with standard heparin or low-molecular weight heparin)...
January 2010: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
H T Benzon, M J Avram, D Green, R O Bonow
The new oral anticoagulants are approved for a variety of clinical syndromes, including the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation, acute coronary syndromes, treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and prevention of venous thrombosis after total joint surgery or hip fracture. Published guidelines have differing recommendations on the safe interval between discontinuation of the anticoagulant and performance of neuraxial procedures and between the interventional procedure and redosing of the drug. While two to three half-life intervals might be acceptable in patients who are at high risk for VTE or stroke, an interval of four to six half-lives between discontinuation of the drug and neuraxial injections is probably safer in most patients at low risk of thrombosis...
December 2013: British Journal of Anaesthesia
Anand Patel, Richard P Goddeau, Nils Henninger
Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation...
2016: Open Cardiovascular Medicine Journal
Lori-Ann Linkins
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 21, 2016: Blood
Nicole Fett
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 22, 2016: JAMA Dermatology
Maureen A Smythe, Jennifer Priziola, Paul P Dobesh, Diane Wirth, Adam Cuker, Ann K Wittkowsky
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious and often fatal medical condition with an increasing incidence. Despite the changing landscape of VTE treatment with the introduction of the new direct oral anticoagulants many uncertainties remain regarding the optimal use of traditional parenteral agents. This manuscript, initiated by the Anticoagulation Forum, provides clinical guidance based on existing guidelines and consensus expert opinion where guidelines are lacking. This specific chapter addresses the practical management of heparins including low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux...
January 2016: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
Guy Meyer, Antoine Vieillard-Baron, Benjamin Planquette
The aim of this narrative review is to summarize for intensivists or any physicians managing "severe" pulmonary embolism (PE) the main recent advances or recommendations in the care of patients including risk stratification, diagnostic algorithm, hemodynamic management in the intensive care unit (ICU), recent data regarding the use of thrombolytic treatment and retrievable vena cava filters and finally results of direct oral anticoagulants. Thanks to the improvements achieved in the risk stratification of patients with PE, a better therapeutic approach is now recommended from diagnosis algorithm and indication to admission in ICU to indication of thrombolysis and general hemodynamic support in patients with shock...
December 2016: Annals of Intensive Care
Shannon W Finks, Toby C Trujillo, Paul P Dobesh
OBJECTIVE: To review clinical data on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) used in the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) as well as practical considerations when using these products. DATA SOURCES: Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for VTE, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and relevant drug international nonproprietary names were conducted. Additional online searches were conducted for prescribing information. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Relevant articles on dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban for the management of VTE compared with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; published between 1966 and December 2015) were reviewed and summarized, together with information on dosing, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interactions...
June 2016: Annals of Pharmacotherapy
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