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14 papers 0 to 25 followers nathan
Mohamed L Elsaie
Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women...
2016: Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology
Uwe Wollina, Alberto Goldman
Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed.
2015: Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology
Bodo C Melnik
Acne vulgaris, an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of adolescence, is closely related to Western diet. Three major food classes that promote acne are: 1) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, 2) milk and dairy products, 3) saturated fats including trans-fats and deficient ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Diet-induced insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1)-signaling is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 levels during puberty, thereby unmasking the impact of aberrant nutrigenomics on sebaceous gland homeostasis...
2015: Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology
M Manfredini, G Mazzaglia, S Ciardo, F Farnetani, V D Mandel, C Longo, S Zauli, V Bettoli, A Virgili, G Pellacani
BACKGROUND: Acne vulgaris is a common disease of the pilosebaceous unit, clinically showing alteration of the keratinization process leading to comedos formation and subsequent inflammatory process. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the morphology of acne lesions and pilosebaceous units by means of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy, in order to non-invasively define the microscopic alterations occurring during the acne process. METHODS: A set of standardized clinical pictures and a set of reflectance confocal images were acquired from 25 volunteers, presenting mild-to-moderate acne, and 10 healthy volunteers, using Vivascope 3000, and 10 mosaics on apparently normal skin were acquired by 5 acne patients and 5 healthy volunteers by Vivascope 1500, and evaluated by experts...
May 2015: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
Eubee Baughn Koo, Tyler Daniel Petersen, Alexandra Boer Kimball
BACKGROUND: Both antibiotics and oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) have been found to be effective in managing acne vulgaris. Despite widespread use, few direct comparisons of efficacy between the 2 modalities have been published. OBJECTIVE: We compared the efficacy of antibiotics and OCPs in managing acne. METHODS: A meta-analysis was conducted in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses and Cochrane collaboration guidelines...
September 2014: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
A Jacobs, G Starke, S Rosumeck, A Nast
The time until a patient achieves a relevant improvement during the treatment of a skin disease is important for selecting a therapy, but has been largely neglected in reviews and guidelines. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the time until the onset of action (TOA) of topical acne treatments. The primary outcome was the TOA defined as the time until a 25% reduction in the mean number of inflammatory lesions had been achieved. A systematic literature search in Medline and Embase was carried out...
March 2014: British Journal of Dermatology
Stephanie Snyder, Ian Crandell, Scott A Davis, Steven R Feldman
BACKGROUND: Poor adherence of acne patients to treatment may equate to poor clinical efficacy, increased healthcare costs, and unnecessary treatments. Authors have investigated risk factors for poor medical adherence and how to improve this difficult problem in the context of acne. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aims to describe what methods have been used to measure adherence, what is known about acne patients' adherence to treatment, and the factors affecting adherence...
April 2014: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
Y L Kong, H L Tey
Acne vulgaris is a common problem encountered by pregnant and lactating women. Unfortunately, in clinical practice, treatment is often not optimized as a result of the lack of safety data and unified recommendations on the use of the various anti-acne therapies. In this narrative review, current data on their safety is summarized. We recommend the use of topical medications as first-line treatment for acne vulgaris in pregnant and lactating women. These include antibiotics (erythromycin, clindamycin, metronidazole and dapsone), benzoyl peroxide, azelaic acid and salicylic acid...
June 2013: Drugs
K Bhate, H C Williams
Despite acne being an almost universal condition in younger people, relatively little is known about its epidemiology. We sought to review what is known about the distribution and causes of acne by conducting a systematic review of relevant epidemiological studies. We searched Medline and Embase to the end of November 2011. The role of Propionibacterium acnes in pathogenesis is unclear: antibiotics have a direct antimicrobial as well as an anti-inflammatory effect. Moderate-to-severe acne affects around 20% of young people and severity correlates with pubertal maturity...
March 2013: British Journal of Dermatology
Lauren L Levy, Joshua A Zeichner
Acne scarring is a commonly encountered yet extremely challenging problem to treat for the dermatologist. As acne scarring can lead to significant psychological distress and low self-esteem, it is of utmost importance to have effective and satisfying treatments in the physician's armamentarium. However, many treatments are unsatisfying, leading to patient disappointment and frustration. Although early treatment of acne lesions and inflammation with isotretinoin is beneficial in preventing acne scarring, many patients still present with troubling noticeable scars...
October 1, 2012: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
Joseph F Sobanko, Tina S Alster
Acne scarring is the result of a deviation in the orderly pattern of healing and can have profound psychosocial implications for patients. While the most effective means of addressing acne scarring is to prevent its formation through good acne control, there are a number of therapeutic interventions that improve the appearance of acne scars. Many of these procedural modalities have flaws and are limited by operator skill and experience. Laser scar revision, on the other hand, is a precise, well tolerated procedure with clinically demonstrable efficacy and minimal adverse effects that may be used alone or in combination with other scar treatments...
October 1, 2012: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
C B Archer, S N Cohen, S E Baron
This article discusses the effects of acne (sometimes referred to as acne vulgaris), how to diagnose it confidently and how to distinguish it from rosacea, and the options available for treatment, especially in primary care. We also suggest when referral to dermatology should be considered, and try to anticipate some frequently asked questions.
May 2012: Clinical and Experimental Dermatology
Ryan Gamble, Jeff Dunn, Annelise Dawson, Brian Petersen, Lauren McLaughlin, Alison Small, Scott Kindle, Robert P Dellavalle
Topical antimicrobial treatment is indicated for mild to moderate acne vulgaris. Our literature review includes searches of Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the databases of the Cochrane Library. A detailed search strategy is included. All searches were limited to controlled trials and systematic reviews. No year limits were applied to the searches, but we focused on trials, guidelines, and reviews published since 2004, the year that the last review of topical antimicrobials was published in this journal. Several controlled trials demonstrate that benzoyl peroxide, topical antibiotics, and topical retinoids used in combination provide the greatest efficacy and safety profile for the treatment of mild to moderate acne, but there are few trials directly comparing different combinations of these topical therapies with one another...
June 1, 2012: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
Hywel C Williams, Robert P Dellavalle, Sarah Garner
Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit resulting from androgen-induced increased sebum production, altered keratinisation, inflammation, and bacterial colonisation of hair follicles on the face, neck, chest, and back by Propionibacterium acnes. Although early colonisation with P acnes and family history might have important roles in the disease, exactly what triggers acne and how treatment affects the course of the disease remain unclear. Other factors such as diet have been implicated, but not proven...
January 28, 2012: Lancet
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