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Sepsis newborn

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15 papers 25 to 100 followers
Mélanie Labrosse, Arielle Levy, Julie Autmizguine, Jocelyn Gravel
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A new noninvasive bladder stimulation technique has been described to obtain clean-catch urine (CCU) in infants aged <30 days. Objectives were (1) to determine proportion and predictive factors for successful CCU collections using a stimulation maneuver technique among infants <6 months and (2) to determine the proportion of bacterial contamination with this method. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary pediatric emergency department among infants <6 months needing a urine sample...
September 2016: Pediatrics
Ryszard Lauterbach, Barbara Wilk, Agata Bocheńska, Joanna Hurkała, Renata Radziszewska
BACKGROUND: Previously, we found that plasma protein C (PC) activity ≤10% significantly increased the probability of the occurrence of death during neonatal sepsis. Accordingly, if the activity of plasma PC declined during the course of sepsis to ≤10%, we administered a nonactivated PC zymogen to increase a PC activity. The aim of that retrospective analysis was to explore treatment effects of PC zymogen supplementation in septic infants, with plasma PC activity ≤10%. METHODS: A database was used to locate 85 newborns treated with PC from among 458 analyzed infants with confirmed sepsis...
September 2016: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Borja Gomez, Santiago Mintegi, Silvia Bressan, Liviana Da Dalt, Alain Gervaix, Laurence Lacroix
BACKGROUND: A sequential approach to young febrile infants on the basis of clinical and laboratory parameters, including procalcitonin, was recently described as an accurate tool in identifying patients at risk for invasive bacterial infection (IBI). Our aim was to prospectively validate the Step-by-Step approach and compare it with the Rochester criteria and the Lab-score. METHODS: Prospective study including infants ≤90 days with fever without source presenting in 11 European pediatric emergency departments between September 2012 and August 2014...
August 2016: Pediatrics
Leigh-Anne Cioffredi, Ravi Jhaveri
IMPORTANCE: Management of febrile children is an intrinsic aspect of pediatric practice. Febrile children account for 15% of emergency department visits and outcomes range from the presence of serious bacterial infection to benign self-limited illness. OBSERVATIONS: Studies from 1979 to 2015 examining febrile infants and children were included in this review. Management of febrile infants younger than 90 days has evolved considerably in the last 30 years. Increased rates of Escherichia coli urinary tract infections, increasing resistance to ampicillin, and advances in viral diagnostics have had an effect on the approach to caring for these patients...
August 1, 2016: JAMA Pediatrics
Sandeep Patil, Sourabh Dutta, Savita Verma Attri, Pallab Ray, Praveen Kumar
BACKGROUND: It is common clinical practice to repeat serum C reactive protein (CRP) estimation in the first 48 h after starting empirical antibiotics for neonatal sepsis. The change in CRP is believed to indicate whether the empirical antibiotics are appropriate or not, but there is little evidence to support this practice. METHODS: This was a nested case-control study on neonates with suspected sepsis (clinical signs+baseline CRP >10 mg/L). We drew samples for serum CRP at baseline and at 24, 36 and 48 h after starting empirical antibiotics and stored them at -20°C...
April 29, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Courtney Kiser, Ursula Nawab, Kristin McKenna, Zubair H Aghai
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Chorioamnionitis (CAM) is a major risk factor for neonatal sepsis. At our institution, neonates exposed to CAM and intrapartum antibiotics are treated with prolonged antimicrobial therapy if laboratory values are abnormal despite a sterile blood culture. Recently, the Committee on the Fetus and Newborn (COFN) recommended a similar strategy for treating neonates exposed to CAM. Our objective was to determine the frequency of abnormal laboratory parameters in term and late-preterm neonates exposed to CAM and evaluate the implication of recent COFN guidelines...
June 2014: Pediatrics
Andi L Shane, Barbara J Stoll
Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection...
January 2014: Journal of Infection
Anna C Seale, Christina W Obiero, James A Berkley
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses the rational development of guidelines for the management of neonatal sepsis in developing countries. RECENT FINDINGS: Diagnosis of neonatal sepsis with high specificity remains challenging in developing countries. Aetiology data, particularly from rural, community-based studies, are very limited, but molecular tests to improve diagnostics are being tested in a community-based study in South Asia. Antibiotic susceptibility data are limited, but suggest reducing susceptibility to first-and second-line antibiotics in both hospital and community-acquired neonatal sepsis...
June 2015: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases
Ying Dong, Christian P Speer
The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS...
May 2015: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
A R Bedford Russell, R Kumar
Early onset neonatal sepsis is persistently associated with poor outcomes, and incites clinical practice based on the fear of missing a treatable infection in a timely fashion. Unnecessary exposure to antibiotics is also hazardous. Diagnostic dilemmas are discussed in this review, and suggestions offered for practical management while awaiting a more rapidly available 'gold standard' test; in an ideal world, this test would be 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the presence of organisms.
July 2015: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Christina W Obiero, Anna C Seale, James A Berkley
Infections are among the leading causes of neonatal mortality, and about 75% of the burden occurs in developing countries. Diagnosis of neonatal sepsis in these countries is dependent on the recognition of a set of nonspecific clinical signs that maximize sensitivity because staff making initial assessments may not have specialist pediatric training. Accurate diagnosis is usually limited by the unavailability of reliable microbiological investigation. The World Health Organization recommends ampicillin (or penicillin; cloxacillin if staphylococcal infection is suspected) plus gentamicin for empiric treatment of neonates with suspected clinical sepsis or meningitis...
June 2015: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Matthew J Bizzarro, Veronika Shabanova, Robert S Baltimore, Louise-Marie Dembry, Richard A Ehrenkranz, Patrick G Gallagher
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate data for the period 2004-2013 to identify changes in demographics, pathogens, and outcomes in a single, level IV neonatal intensive care unit. STUDY DESIGN: Sepsis episodes were identified prospectively and additional information obtained retrospectively from infants with sepsis while in the neonatal intensive care unit from 2004 to 2013. Demographics, hospital course, and outcome data were collected and analyzed. Sepsis was categorized as early (≤3 days of life) or late-onset (>3 days of life)...
May 2015: Journal of Pediatrics
Antoinette Tshefu, Adrien Lokangaka, Serge Ngaima, Cyril Engmann, Fabian Esamai, Peter Gisore, Adejumoke Idowu Ayede, Adegoke Gbadegesin Falade, Ebunoluwa A Adejuyigbe, Chineme Henry Anyabolu, Robinson D Wammanda, Clara L Ejembi, William N Ogala, Lu Gram, Simon Cousens
BACKGROUND: WHO recommends hospital-based treatment for young infants aged 0-59 days with clinical signs of possible serious bacterial infection, but most families in resource-poor settings cannot accept referral. We aimed to assess whether use of simplified antibiotic regimens to treat young infants with clinical signs of severe infection was as efficacious as an injectable procaine benzylpenicillin-gentamicin combination for 7 days for situations in which hospital referral was not possible...
May 2, 2015: Lancet
Kari A Simonsen, Ann L Anderson-Berry, Shirley F Delair, H Dele Davies
Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR...
January 2014: Clinical Microbiology Reviews
Richard A Polin
With improved obstetrical management and evidence-based use of intrapartum antimicrobial therapy, early-onset neonatal sepsis is becoming less frequent. However, early-onset sepsis remains one of the most common causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the preterm population. The identification of neonates at risk for early-onset sepsis is frequently based on a constellation of perinatal risk factors that are neither sensitive nor specific. Furthermore, diagnostic tests for neonatal sepsis have a poor positive predictive accuracy...
May 2012: Pediatrics
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