collection
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Resistant Fistulizing Crohn's disease + TX Rheumatoid Arthritis

shared collection
1 papers 0 to 25 followers Combining infliximab and methotrexate in fistulizing Crohn's disease resistant or intolerant to azathioprine. Schröder O, et al. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004. Show full citation Abstract BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease is complicated by fistulas in 20-40% of patients at some time during the course of their illness. Azathioprine has been reported to heal fistulas in 30-40% of cases. Long-lasting effects by the anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha antibody infliximab most often require repeated infusions. Methotrexate has been shown to be an effective drug in maintaining remission in Crohn's disease. AIM: To evaluate the combination of infliximab and methotrexate as therapy for fistulas in patients with Crohn's disease. METHODS: Twelve consecutive patients (mean age, 29.5 years) with fistulizing Crohn's disease resistant or intolerant to azathioprine were followed prospectively. Patients received three infusions of infliximab (5 mg/kg) and long-term methotrexate (20 mg/week). Therapy success was defined as sustained closure of fistulas > or = 6 months after fistula closure. RESULTS: In four of the 12 patients, complete closure of fistulas that persisted for > or = 6 months (median follow-up, 13.25 months) was observed. In three further patients, a partial response was noted. In five patients, persistent therapy success could not be achieved or therapy had to be stopped due to side-effects. CONCLUSIONS: A combination of infliximab with long-term methotrexate may be a promising concept in fistulizing Crohn's disease. Our data indicate the need for larger controlled trials. PMID 14984376 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. +++ Infliximab: an updated review of its use in Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Review article Keating GM, et al. BioDrugs. 2002. Show full citation Abstract Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and neutralises its effects. TNFalpha plays an important role in the development of both Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In a large, double-blind, randomised study involving patients with active, refractory Crohn's disease, significantly more recipients of intravenous infliximab, compared with placebo, achieved a clinical response after 4 weeks' follow-up. Moreover, infliximab administration was associated with a rapid improvement in endoscopic and histological findings in clinical trials involving patients with active, refractory Crohn's disease. The results of the A Crohn's Disease Clinical Trial Evaluating Infliximab in a New Long-Term Treatment Regimen (ACCENT) I study showed that maintenance infliximab therapy prolonged response and remission in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. In patients with enterocutaneous fistulae associated with Crohn's disease who were involved in a double-blind, randomised study, significantly more patients who received multiple infusions of infliximab, compared with placebo, experienced a > or=50% reduction from baseline in the number of draining fistulae at > or =2 consecutive study visits. In patients with active rheumatoid arthritis refractory to treatment with methotrexate who were enrolled in a large, double-blind, randomised study [the Anti-TNF Trial in Rheumatoid Arthritis with Concomitant Therapy (ATTRACT) study], American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20, 50 and 70% response rates were seen in significantly more patients who received multiple infusions of infliximab plus methotrexate, compared with methotrexate plus placebo, after 30 and 54 weeks' treatment. Moreover, the ACR 20% response rate was maintained after 102 weeks' treatment. In addition, significantly less radiographic progression was seen in infliximab plus methotrexate, compared with methotrexate plus placebo, recipients after 54 weeks' treatment. Infliximab therapy was also associated with improvements in health-related quality of life in patients with Crohn's disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Infliximab was generally well tolerated in clinical trials with the most common adverse events including upper respiratory tract infection, headache, nausea, coughing, sinusitis and diarrhoea. Infliximab therapy may be associated with an increased risk of reactivation of tuberculosis in patients with latent disease. In conclusion, infliximab is an important treatment option in patients with active Crohn's disease who have not responded to conventional therapy and in patients with Crohn's disease who have fistulae. Moreover, infliximab plus methotrexate is effective in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis who have not responded adequately to traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, in terms of reducing symptoms and signs, improving physical function and delaying the progression of structural damage. PMID 11985485 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE Review article Keating GM, et al. BioDrugs. 2002. Show full citation Abstract Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and neutralises its effects. TNFalpha plays an important role in the development of both Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In a large, double-blind, randomised study involving patients with active, refractory Crohn's disease, significantly more recipients of intravenous infliximab, compared with placebo, achieved a clinical response after 4 weeks' follow-up. Moreover, infliximab administration was associated with a rapid improvement in endoscopic and histological findings in clinical trials involving patients with active, refractory Crohn's disease. The results of the A Crohn's Disease Clinical Trial Evaluating Infliximab in a New Long-Term Treatment Regimen (ACCENT) I study showed that maintenance infliximab therapy prolonged response and remission in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. In patients with enterocutaneous fistulae associated with Crohn's disease who were involved in a double-blind, randomised study, significantly more patients who received multiple infusions of infliximab, compared with placebo, experienced a > or=50% reduction from baseline in the number of draining fistulae at > or =2 consecutive study visits. In patients with active rheumatoid arthritis refractory to treatment with methotrexate who were enrolled in a large, double-blind, randomised study [the Anti-TNF Trial in Rheumatoid Arthritis with Concomitant Therapy (ATTRACT) study], American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20, 50 and 70% response rates were seen in significantly more patients who received multiple infusions of infliximab plus methotrexate, compared with methotrexate plus placebo, after 30 and 54 weeks' treatment. Moreover, the ACR 20% response rate was maintained after 102 weeks' treatment. In addition, significantly less radiographic progression was seen in infliximab plus methotrexate, compared with methotrexate plus placebo, recipients after 54 weeks' treatment. Infliximab therapy was also associated with improvements in health-related quality of life in patients with Crohn's disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Infliximab was generally well tolerated in clinical trials with the most common adverse events including upper respiratory tract infection, headache, nausea, coughing, sinusitis and diarrhoea. Infliximab therapy may be associated with an increased risk of reactivation of tuberculosis in patients with latent disease. In conclusion, infliximab is an important treatment option in patients with active Crohn's disease who have not responded to conventional therapy and in patients with Crohn's disease who have fistulae. Moreover, infliximab plus methotrexate is effective in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis who have not responded adequately to traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, in terms of reducing symptoms and signs, improving physical function and delaying the progression of structural damage. PMID 11985485 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26752471/preclinical-and-undiagnosed-crohn-s-disease-the-submerged-iceberg
#1
REVIEW
Dario Sorrentino
Little is known on the natural history of Crohn's disease (CD) before diagnosis. By the time the patient is diagnosed, the disease has often produced considerable damage to the intestinal mucosa and sometimes other organs. Such period before diagnosis might involve both a silent and a symptomatic phase. The silent phase, or preclinical CD, might last several years after the biological disease onset. Evidence is accumulating that the symptomatic phase might also go undiagnosed for months or years. In fact, for each established case of CD, there are probably several undiagnosed cases, a classic iceberg phenomenon of disease...
February 2016: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
1
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"