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Non-Invasive Ventilation in the NICU

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57 papers 25 to 100 followers Collection of papers on Non-Invasive Ventilation in Neonatal Patients
By Pedro Paz Neonatologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866188/feasibility-of-laryngeal-mask-airway-device-placement-in-neonates
#1
Amanda A Wanous, Andrew Wey, Kyle D Rudser, Kari D Roberts
BACKGROUND: The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used in adult and pediatric populations for decades. While the familiarity of its use in the neonatal population is increasing, there are few data investigating this. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of LMA placement in neonates by investigating the time and number of attempts required for successful placement and physiologic stability during the placement of the device. METHODS: This study is one component of a national, multicenter, randomized controlled trial investigating surfactant administration through an LMA in neonates...
November 19, 2016: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892756/use-of-high-non-invasive-respiratory-support-pressures-in-preterm-neonates-a-single-centre-experience
#2
Abdulaziz Binmanee, Salhab El Helou, Sandesh Shivananda, Christoph Fusch, Amit Mukerji
PURPOSE: To describe the incidence, indications and clinical outcomes following high pressures on non-invasive respiratory support (NRS) in preterm neonates. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of all neonates with BW < 1,500 g admitted from July 2012 to June 2014 and placed on high NRS, defined as mean airway pressure ≥ 10 cm H2O for at least 12 continuous hours using NCPAP and/or nasal high frequency ventilation (NIHFV). Clinical and physiological outcomes following high NRS were ascertained...
November 28, 2016: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852668/less-invasive-surfactant-administration-versus-intubation-for-surfactant-delivery-in-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#3
Jose C Aldana-Aguirre, Merlin Pinto, Robin M Featherstone, Manoj Kumar
CONTEXT: In spontaneously breathing preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) receiving nasal continuous positive airway pressure, a method of less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) using a thin catheter has been described as an alternative to endotracheal intubation for surfactant delivery to reduce lung injury. OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LISA with the standard method of surfactant delivery for clinical outcomes...
November 15, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842300/quicksf-a-new-technique-in-surfactant-administration
#4
Christian A Maiwald, Patrick Neuberger, Matthias Vochem, Christian Poets
BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate an increasing use of less invasive surfactant administration. Different techniques have been shown with distinct risks and benefits. The aim of this study was to develop a new method that simplifies this procedure. OBJECTIVES: An applicator was developed and tested on a manikin to make tracheal surfactant application easier and faster. METHODS: A device for oral administration of a catheter into the trachea was developed...
November 15, 2016: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27711045/non-invasive-inhaled-nitric-oxide-in-the-treatment-of-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-in-term-and-preterm-infants
#5
R Sahni, X Ameer, K Ohira-Kist, J-T Wung
OBJECTIVES: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is effective in conjunction with tracheal intubation (TI) and mechanical ventilation (MV) for treating arterial pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF) in near-term and term newborns. Non-invasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is increasingly used to avoid morbidity associated with TI and MV, yet the effectiveness of iNO delivery via nasal CPAP remains unknown. To evaluate the effectiveness of iNO delivered via the bubble nasal CPAP system in term and preterm newborns with HRF...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26871833/hemodynamic-effects-of-nasal-intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation-in-preterm-infants
#6
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Hung-Yang Chang, Kun-Shan Cheng, Hou-Ling Lung, Sung-Tse Li, Chien-Yu Lin, Hung-Chang Lee, Ching-Hsiao Lee, Hsiao-Fang Hung
Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) have proven to be effective modes of noninvasive respiratory support in preterm infants. Although they are increasingly used in neonatal intensive care, their hemodynamic consequences have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic changes between NIPPV and NCPAP in preterm infants.This prospective observational study enrolled clinically stable preterm infants requiring respiratory support received NCPAP and nonsynchronized NIPPV at 40/minute for 30 minutes each, in random order...
February 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27109425/the-clinical-effectiveness-and-cost-effectiveness-of-heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-compared-with-usual-care-for-preterm-infants-systematic-review-and-economic-evaluation
#7
Nigel Fleeman, James Mahon, Vickie Bates, Rumona Dickson, Yenal Dundar, Kerry Dwan, Laura Ellis, Eleanor Kotas, Marty Richardson, Prakesh Shah, Ben Nj Shaw
BACKGROUND: Respiratory problems are one of the most common causes of morbidity in preterm infants and may be treated with several modalities for respiratory support such as nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) or nasal intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. The heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) is gaining popularity in clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: To address the clinical effectiveness of HHHFNC compared with usual care for preterm infants we systematically reviewed the evidence of HHHFNC with usual care following ventilation (the primary analysis) and with no prior ventilation (the secondary analysis)...
April 2016: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27120482/surfactant-treatment-threshold-during-ncpap-for-the-treatment-of-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#8
Carlo Dani
Although surfactant is the most studied drug in the preterm infant, the best criteria for treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with surfactant have been not extensively investigated. We assessed the criteria used for deciding the rescue surfactant treatment of preterm infants with RDS in combination with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as reported by the main recent randomized controlled trials. We evaluated 10 studies and found that the criteria chosen for administering selective surfactant were very heterogeneous, different types and doses of surfactant were used, and this limits their applicability in the clinical practice...
August 2016: American Journal of Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27532363/heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-vs-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-for-respiratory-distress-syndrome-of-prematurity-a-randomized-clinical-noninferiority-trial
#9
Anna Lavizzari, Mariarosa Colnaghi, Francesca Ciuffini, Chiara Veneroni, Stefano Musumeci, Ivan Cortinovis, Fabio Mosca
Importance: Heated, humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) has gained increasing popularity as respiratory support for newborn infants thanks to ease of use and improved patient comfort. However, its role as primary therapy for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of prematurity needs to be further elucidated by large, randomized clinical trials. Objective: To determine whether HHHFNC provides respiratory support noninferior to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) or bilevel nCPAP (BiPAP) as a primary approach to RDS in infants older than 28 weeks' gestational age (GA)...
August 8, 2016: JAMA Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27538798/efficacy-of-a-new-technique-intubate-recruit-surfactant-extubate-in-rec-sur-e-in-preterm-neonates-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome-study-protocol-for-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#10
Giovanni Vento, Roberta Pastorino, Luca Boni, Francesco Cota, Virgilio Carnielli, Filip Cools, Carlo Dani, Fabio Mosca, Jane Pillow, Graeme Polglase, Paolo Tagliabue, Anton H van Kaam, Maria Luisa Ventura, Milena Tana, Chiara Tirone, Claudia Aurilia, Alessandra Lio, Cinzia Ricci, Alessandro Gambacorta, Chiara Consigli, Danila D'Onofrio, Camilla Gizzi, Luca Massenzi, Viviana Cardilli, Alessandra Casati, Roberto Bottino, Federica Pontiggia, Elena Ciarmoli, Stefano Martinelli, Laura Ilardi, Mariarosa Colnaghi, Piero Giuseppe Matassa, Valentina Vendettuoli, Paolo Villani, Francesca Fusco, Diego Gazzolo, Alberto Ricotti, Federica Ferrero, Ilaria Stasi, Rosario Magaldi, Gianfranco Maffei, Giuseppe Presta, Roberto Perniola, Francesco Messina, Giovanna Montesano, Chiara Poggi, Lucio Giordano, Enza Roma, Carolina Grassia, Gaetano Ausanio, Fabrizio Sandri, Giovanna Mescoli, Francesco Giura, Giampaolo Garani, Agostina Solinas, Maria Lucente, Gabriella Nigro, Antonello Del Vecchio, Flavia Petrillo, Luigi Orfeo, Lidia Grappone, Lorenzo Quartulli, Antonio Scorrano, Hubert Messner, Alex Staffler, Giancarlo Gargano, Eleonora Balestri, Stefano Nobile, Caterina Cacace, Valerio Meli, Sara Dallaglio, Betta Pasqua, Loretta Mattia, Eloisa Gitto, Marcello Vitaliti, Maria Paola Re, Stefania Vedovato, Alessandra Grison, Alberto Berardi, Francesco Torcetta, Isotta Guidotti, Sandra di Fabio, Eugenia Maranella, Isabella Mondello, Stefano Visentin, Francesca Tormena
BACKGROUND: Although beneficial in clinical practice, the INtubate-SURfactant-Extubate (IN-SUR-E) method is not successful in all preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome, with a reported failure rate ranging from 19 to 69 %. One of the possible mechanisms responsible for the unsuccessful IN-SUR-E method, requiring subsequent re-intubation and mechanical ventilation, is the inability of the preterm lung to achieve and maintain an "optimal" functional residual capacity. The importance of lung recruitment before surfactant administration has been demonstrated in animal studies showing that recruitment leads to a more homogeneous surfactant distribution within the lungs...
August 18, 2016: Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27678511/surfactant-instillation-in-spontaneously-breathing-preterm-infants-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#11
Vincent Rigo, Caroline Lefebvre, Isabelle Broux
: Less invasive surfactant therapies (LIST) use surfactant instillation through a thin tracheal catheter in spontaneously breathing infants. This review and meta-analysis investigates respiratory outcomes for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome treated with LIST rather than administration of surfactant through an endotracheal tube. Randomised controlled trial (RCT) full texts provided outcome data for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), death or BPD, early CPAP failure, invasive ventilation requirements and usual neonatal morbidities...
September 27, 2016: European Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27365307/incidence-and-outcome-of-cpap-failure-in-preterm-infants
#12
Peter A Dargaville, Angela Gerber, Stefan Johansson, Antonio G De Paoli, C Omar F Kamlin, Francesca Orsini, Peter G Davis
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Data from clinical trials support the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for initial respiratory management in preterm infants, but there is concern regarding the potential failure of CPAP support. We aimed to examine the incidence and explore the outcomes of CPAP failure in Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network data from 2007 to 2013. METHODS: Data from inborn preterm infants managed on CPAP from the outset were analyzed in 2 gestational age ranges (25-28 and 29-32 completed weeks)...
July 2016: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27653564/nasal-high-flow-therapy-for-primary-respiratory-support-in-preterm-infants
#13
Calum T Roberts, Louise S Owen, Brett J Manley, Dag H Frøisland, Susan M Donath, Kim M Dalziel, Margo A Pritchard, David W Cartwright, Clare L Collins, Atul Malhotra, Peter G Davis
Background Treatment with nasal high-flow therapy has efficacy similar to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) when used as postextubation support in neonates. The efficacy of high-flow therapy as the primary means of respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress has not been proved. Methods In this international, multicenter, randomized, noninferiority trial, we assigned 564 preterm infants (gestational age, ≥28 weeks 0 days) with early respiratory distress who had not received surfactant replacement to treatment with either nasal high-flow therapy or nasal CPAP...
September 22, 2016: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27649091/european-consensus-guidelines-on-the-management-of-respiratory-distress-syndrome-2016-update
#14
David G Sweet, Virgilio Carnielli, Gorm Greisen, Mikko Hallman, Eren Ozek, Richard Plavka, Ola Didrik Saugstad, Umberto Simeoni, Christian P Speer, Máximo Vento, Gerard H A Visser, Henry L Halliday
Advances in the management of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ensure that clinicians must continue to revise current practice. We report the third update of the European Guidelines for the Management of RDS by a European panel of expert neonatologists including input from an expert perinatal obstetrician based on available literature up to the beginning of 2016. Optimizing the outcome for babies with RDS includes consideration of when to use antenatal steroids, and good obstetric practice includes methods of predicting the risk of preterm delivery and also consideration of whether transfer to a perinatal centre is necessary and safe...
September 21, 2016: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27371758/biphasic-positive-airway-pressure-or-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-a-randomized-trial
#15
Suresh Victor, Stephen A Roberts, Simon Mitchell, Huma Aziz, Tina Lavender
BACKGROUND: There is currently no clear evidence that nasal-biphasic positive airway pressure (n-BiPAP) confers any advantage over nasal-continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP). Our hypothesis was that preterm infants born before 30 weeks' gestation and <2 weeks old when extubated onto n-BiPAP will have a lower risk of extubation failure than infants extubated onto n-CPAP at equivalent mean airway pressure. METHODS: We conducted an unblinded multicenter randomized trial comparing n-CPAP with n-BiPAP in infants born <30 weeks' gestation and <2 weeks old...
August 2016: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27532916/association-of-noninvasive-ventilation-strategies-with-mortality-and-bronchopulmonary-dysplasia-among-preterm-infants-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#16
REVIEW
Tetsuya Isayama, Hiroko Iwami, Sarah McDonald, Joseph Beyene
IMPORTANCE: Various noninvasive ventilation strategies are used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) of preterm infants; however, the best mode is uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To compare 7 ventilation strategies for preterm infants including nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) alone, intubation and surfactant administration followed by immediate extubation (INSURE), less invasive surfactant administration (LISA), noninvasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation, nebulized surfactant administration, surfactant administration via laryngeal mask airway, and mechanical ventilation...
August 9, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26955624/analysis-and-comparison-of-the-effects-of-n-bipap-and-bubble-cpap-in-treatment-of-preterm-newborns-with-the-weight-of-below-1500-grams-affiliated-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-randomised-clinical-trial
#17
Alireza Sadeghnia, Behzad Barekateyn, Zohre Badiei, Seyyed Mohsen Hosseini
BACKGROUND: Nowadays, establishment of nCPAP and surfactant administration is considered to be the first level of intervention for newborns engaged in the process of Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS). In order to decrease the side effects of the nCPAP management placed in noninvasive-non-cycled respiratory support. Noninvasive-cycled respiratory support mechanism have been developed such as N-BiPAP. Therefore, we compared N-BiPAP with Bubble-CPAP in a clinical trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This research was done as an on newborns weighing less than 1500 grams affiliated with RDS...
2016: Advanced Biomedical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27307960/comparison-of-complications-and-efficacy-of-nippv-and-nasal-cpap-in-preterm-infants-with-rds
#18
Tahereh Esmaeilnia, Fatemeh Nayeri, Roya Taheritafti, Mamak Shariat, Faezeh Moghimpour-Bijani
BACKGROUND: Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is one of the most common diseases in neonates admitted to NICU. For this important cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm neonates, several treatment methods have been used. To date, non-invasive methods are preferred due to fewer complications. OBJECTIVES: Herein, two non-invasive methods of ventilation support are compared: NCPAP vs. NIPPV. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a randomized clinical trial...
April 2016: Iranian Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27526104/leakage-in-nasal-high-frequency-oscillatory-ventilation-improves-carbon-dioxide-clearance-a-bench-study
#19
Daniel Klotz, Christoph Schaefer, Dimitra Stavropoulou, Hans Fuchs, Stefan Schumann
OBJECTIVE: Nasal high frequency oscillatory ventilation (nHFOV) is a promising mode of non-invasive neonatal respiratory support. To combine the effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and high frequency oscillatory ventilation, an oscillatory pressure waveform is superposed to a nCPAP via a nasal or nasopharyngeal interface. nHFOV has been described to facilitate carbon dioxide (CO2 ) elimination compared to nCPAP. The influence of unintended leakage on CO2 elimination has not been investigated in nHFOV before...
August 15, 2016: Pediatric Pulmonology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27500013/effectiveness-of-synchronized-noninvasive-ventilation-to-prevent-intubation-in-preterm-infants
#20
Cristina Ramos-Navarro, Manuel Sanchez-Luna, Ester Sanz-López, Elena Maderuelo-Rodriguez, Elena Zamora-Flores
BACKGROUND: Noninvasive ventilation is being increasingly used on preterm infants to reduce ventilator lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV) to prevent intubation in premature infants. METHODS: Prospective observational study of SNIPPV use on preterm infants of less than 32 weeks' gestation. All patients were managed using a prospective protocol intended to reduce invasive mechanical ventilation (iMV) use...
July 2016: American Journal of Perinatology Reports
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