collection
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Non-Invasive Ventilation in the NICU

shared collection
69 papers 25 to 100 followers Collection of papers on Non-Invasive Ventilation in Neonatal Patients
By Pedro Paz Neonatologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292963/electrical-activity-of-the-diaphragm-during-ncpap-and-high-flow-nasal-cannula
#1
C G de Waal, G J Hutten, J V Kraaijenga, F H de Jongh, A H van Kaam
OBJECTIVE: To determine if the electrical activity of the diaphragm, as measure of neural respiratory drive and breathing effort, changes over time in preterm infants transitioned from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) to high flow nasal cannula (HFNC). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: Stable preterm infants transitioned from nCPAP to HFNC using a 1:1 pressure to flow ratio...
March 14, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28244292/humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-as-an-initial-respiratory-support-in-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-a-randomized-controlled-non-inferiority-trial
#2
Jeonghee Shin, Kyuhee Park, Eun Hee Lee, Byung Min Choi
Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress...
April 2017: Journal of Korean Medical Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219880/nasal-cpap-for-neonatal-respiratory-support-in-low-and-middle-income-countries
#3
Tom Lissauer, Trevor Duke, Kathy Mellor, Liz Molyneux
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213557/tension-pneumocephalus-induced-by-high-flow-nasal-cannula-ventilation-in-a-neonate
#4
Alicia Iglesias-Deus, Alejandro Pérez-Muñuzuri, Olalla López-Suárez, Pilar Crespo, Maria-Luz Couce
The use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy as respiratory support for preterm infants has increased rapidly worldwide. The evidence available for the use of HFNC is as an alternative to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and in particular to prevent postextubation failure. We report a case of tension pneumocephalus in a preterm infant as a complication during HFNC ventilation. Significant neurological impairment was detected and support was eventually withdrawn. Few cases of pneumocephalus as a complication of positive airway pressure have been reported in the neonatal period, and they all have been related to CPAP...
March 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27849235/randomized-controlled-trial-comparing-nasal-intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation-and-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-in-premature-infants-after-tracheal-extubation
#5
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Daniela Franco Rizzo Komatsu, Edna Maria de Albuquerque Diniz, Alexandre Archanjo Ferraro, Maria Esther Jurvest Rivero Ceccon, Flávio Adolfo Costa Vaz
Objective: To analyze the frequency of extubation failure in premature infants using conventional mechanical ventilation (MV) after extubation in groups subjected to nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (nIPPV) and continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). Method: Seventy-two premature infants with respiratory failure were studied, with a gestational age (GA) ≤ 36 weeks and birth weight (BW) > 750 g, who required tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation...
September 2016: Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27976361/early-nasal-intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation-nippv-versus-early-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-ncpap-for-preterm-infants
#6
REVIEW
Brigitte Lemyre, Matthew Laughon, Carl Bose, Peter G Davis
BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is a strategy for maintaining positive airway pressure throughout the respiratory cycle through the application of bias flow of respiratory gas to an apparatus attached to the nose. Treatment with NCPAP is associated with decreased risk of mechanical ventilation and might be effective in reducing chronic lung disease. Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is a form of noninvasive ventilation during which patients are exposed intermittently to higher levels of airway pressure, along with NCPAP through the same nasal device...
December 15, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28146296/nasal-intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation-nippv-versus-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-ncpap-for-preterm-neonates-after-extubation
#7
REVIEW
Brigitte Lemyre, Peter G Davis, Antonio G De Paoli, Haresh Kirpalani
BACKGROUND: Previous randomised trials and meta-analyses have shown that nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is a useful method for providing respiratory support after extubation. However, this treatment sometimes 'fails' in infants, and they may require endotracheal re-intubation with its attendant risks and expense. Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) can augment NCPAP by delivering ventilator breaths via nasal prongs. Older children and adults with chronic respiratory failure benefit from NIPPV, and the technique has been applied to neonates...
February 1, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28120525/prophylactic-sustained-lung-inflation-followed-by-early-cpap-vs-early-cpap-at-birth-in-extreme-preterm-neonates
#8
Neeraj Gupta, Ramesh Agarwal
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073106/surfactant-need-by-gestation-for-very-preterm-babies-initiated-on-early-nasal-cpap-a-danish-observational-multicentre-study-of-6-628-infants-born-2000-2013
#9
Rikke Wiingreen, Gorm Greisen, Finn Ebbesen, Jesper Padkær Petersen, Gitte Zachariassen, Tine Brink Henriksen, Bo Mølholm Hansen
BACKGROUND: In recent years, early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) as respiratory support for preterm infants is being advocated as an alternative to prophylactic surfactant and treatment with mechanical ventilation. A number of infants treated with early nCPAP do not need treatment with surfactant, but few studies provide data on this. Since the 1990s, the first approach to respiratory support to preterm infants in Denmark has been early nCPAP combined with surfactant administration by the INSURE method by which the infant is intubated and surfactant administration is followed by rapid extubation to nCPAP if possible...
January 11, 2017: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28029185/case-control-study-demonstrates-that-surfactant-without-intubation-delayed-mechanical-ventilation-in-preterm-infants
#10
Sigrid Dannheim Vik, Torstein Vik, Stian Lydersen, Ragnhild Støen
AIM: This Norwegian study explored whether administering surfactant without intubation (SWI) delayed the need for early mechanical ventilation and reduced respiratory and nonrespiratory complications in infants born before 32 weeks of gestational age. METHODS: We compared 262 infants admitted to a level-three neonatal intensive care unit: 134 born before the introduction of SWI on 1 December 2011 were in the control group and 128 infants born after this date were in the study group...
December 28, 2016: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011792/high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-ncpap-duration-to-full-oral-feeds-in-preterm-infants-a-randomised-controlled-trial
#11
Sinead J Glackin, Anne O'Sullivan, Sherly George, Jana Semberova, Jan Miletin
OBJECTIVE: To compare the time taken by preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease to achieve full oral feeding when supported with humidified high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) or nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). DESIGN: Single centre randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Level III neonatal intensive care unit at the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. PATIENTS: Very low birthweight (birth weight <1500 g) infants born before 30 weeks' gestation who were NCPAP-dependent at 32 weeks corrected gestational age were eligible to participate...
December 23, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27989413/a-noninvasive-surfactant-adsorption-test-predicting-the-need-for-surfactant-therapy-in-preterm-infants-treated-with-continuous-positive-airway-pressure
#12
Chiara Autilio, Mercedes Echaide, Alexandra Benachi, Anne Marfaing-Koka, Ettore D Capoluongo, Jesús Pérez-Gil, Daniele De Luca
OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the surfactant adsorption test (SAT) as a predictor for the need for surfactant replacement therapy in neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). STUDY DESIGN: Amniotic fluid samples were collected from 41 preterm neonates with RDS treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and 15 healthy control term neonates. Purified porcine surfactant served as a further control. Lamellar bodies and lung ultrasound score were also measured in a subset of the neonates treated with CPAP...
March 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866188/feasibility-of-laryngeal-mask-airway-device-placement-in-neonates
#13
Amanda A Wanous, Andrew Wey, Kyle D Rudser, Kari D Roberts
BACKGROUND: The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used in adult and pediatric populations for decades. While the familiarity of its use in the neonatal population is increasing, there are few data investigating this. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of LMA placement in neonates by investigating the time and number of attempts required for successful placement and physiologic stability during the placement of the device. METHODS: This study is one component of a national, multicenter, randomized controlled trial investigating surfactant administration through an LMA in neonates...
2017: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892756/use-of-high-noninvasive-respiratory-support-pressures-in-preterm-neonates-a-single-center-experience
#14
Abdulaziz Binmanee, Salhab El Helou, Sandesh Shivananda, Christoph Fusch, Amit Mukerji
PURPOSE: To describe the incidence, indications and clinical outcomes following high pressures on noninvasive respiratory support (NRS) in preterm neonates. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of all neonates with BW <1.500 g admitted from July 2012 to June 2014 and placed on high noninvasive respiratory support (NRS), defined as mean airway pressure ≥10 cm H2O for at least 12 continuous hours using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) and/or nasal high-frequency ventilation (NIHFV)...
February 7, 2017: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852668/less-invasive-surfactant-administration-versus-intubation-for-surfactant-delivery-in-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#15
REVIEW
Jose C Aldana-Aguirre, Merlin Pinto, Robin M Featherstone, Manoj Kumar
CONTEXT: In spontaneously breathing preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) receiving nasal continuous positive airway pressure, a method of less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) using a thin catheter has been described as an alternative to endotracheal intubation for surfactant delivery to reduce lung injury. OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LISA with the standard method of surfactant delivery for clinical outcomes...
January 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842300/quicksf-a-new-technique-in-surfactant-administration
#16
Christian A Maiwald, Patrick Neuberger, Matthias Vochem, Christian Poets
BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate an increasing use of less invasive surfactant administration. Different techniques have been shown with distinct risks and benefits. The aim of this study was to develop a new method that simplifies this procedure. OBJECTIVES: An applicator was developed and tested on a manikin to make tracheal surfactant application easier and faster. METHODS: A device for oral administration of a catheter into the trachea was developed...
2017: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27711045/non-invasive-inhaled-nitric-oxide-in-the-treatment-of-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-in-term-and-preterm-infants
#17
R Sahni, X Ameer, K Ohira-Kist, J-T Wung
OBJECTIVES: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is effective in conjunction with tracheal intubation (TI) and mechanical ventilation (MV) for treating arterial pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF) in near-term and term newborns. Non-invasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is increasingly used to avoid morbidity associated with TI and MV, yet the effectiveness of iNO delivery via nasal CPAP remains unknown. To evaluate the effectiveness of iNO delivered via the bubble nasal CPAP system in term and preterm newborns with HRF...
January 2017: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26871833/hemodynamic-effects-of-nasal-intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation-in-preterm-infants
#18
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Hung-Yang Chang, Kun-Shan Cheng, Hou-Ling Lung, Sung-Tse Li, Chien-Yu Lin, Hung-Chang Lee, Ching-Hsiao Lee, Hsiao-Fang Hung
Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) have proven to be effective modes of noninvasive respiratory support in preterm infants. Although they are increasingly used in neonatal intensive care, their hemodynamic consequences have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic changes between NIPPV and NCPAP in preterm infants.This prospective observational study enrolled clinically stable preterm infants requiring respiratory support received NCPAP and nonsynchronized NIPPV at 40/minute for 30 minutes each, in random order...
February 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27109425/the-clinical-effectiveness-and-cost-effectiveness-of-heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-compared-with-usual-care-for-preterm-infants-systematic-review-and-economic-evaluation
#19
Nigel Fleeman, James Mahon, Vickie Bates, Rumona Dickson, Yenal Dundar, Kerry Dwan, Laura Ellis, Eleanor Kotas, Marty Richardson, Prakesh Shah, Ben Nj Shaw
BACKGROUND: Respiratory problems are one of the most common causes of morbidity in preterm infants and may be treated with several modalities for respiratory support such as nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) or nasal intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. The heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) is gaining popularity in clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: To address the clinical effectiveness of HHHFNC compared with usual care for preterm infants we systematically reviewed the evidence of HHHFNC with usual care following ventilation (the primary analysis) and with no prior ventilation (the secondary analysis)...
April 2016: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27120482/surfactant-treatment-threshold-during-ncpap-for-the-treatment-of-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#20
Carlo Dani
Although surfactant is the most studied drug in the preterm infant, the best criteria for treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with surfactant have been not extensively investigated. We assessed the criteria used for deciding the rescue surfactant treatment of preterm infants with RDS in combination with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as reported by the main recent randomized controlled trials. We evaluated 10 studies and found that the criteria chosen for administering selective surfactant were very heterogeneous, different types and doses of surfactant were used, and this limits their applicability in the clinical practice...
August 2016: American Journal of Perinatology
label_collection
label_collection
6148
1
2
2016-10-07 18:25:47
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"