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15 papers 25 to 100 followers
John H Boyd, Demetrios Sirounis, Julien Maizel, Michel Slama
BACKGROUND: In critically ill patients at risk for organ failure, the administration of intravenous fluids has equal chances of resulting in benefit or harm. While the intent of intravenous fluid is to increase cardiac output and oxygen delivery, unwelcome results in those patients who do not increase their cardiac output are tissue edema, hypoxemia, and excess mortality. Here we briefly review bedside methods to assess fluid responsiveness, focusing upon the strengths and pitfalls of echocardiography in spontaneously breathing mechanically ventilated patients as a means to guide fluid management...
2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Airton Leonardo de Oliveira Manoel, Alberto Goffi, Fernando Godinho Zampieri, David Turkel-Parrella, Abhijit Duggal, Thomas R Marotta, R Loch Macdonald, Simon Abrahamson
Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), defined as nontraumatic bleeding into the brain parenchyma, is the second most common subtype of stroke, with 5.3 million cases and over 3 million deaths reported worldwide in 2010. Case fatality is extremely high (reaching approximately 60 % at 1 year post event). Only 20 % of patients who survive are independent within 6 months. Factors such as chronic hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and anticoagulation are commonly associated with ICH. Chronic arterial hypertension represents the major risk factor for bleeding...
2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Itzhak Brook
Anaerobes are the most predominant components of the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are a frequent cause of endogenous bacterial infections. Anaerobic infections can occur in all body locations: the central nervous system, oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin, and soft tissues. Treatment of anaerobic infection is complicated by their slow growth in culture, by their polymicrobial nature and by their growing resistance to antimicrobials. Antimicrobial therapy is frequently the only form of therapy needed, whereas in others it is an important adjunct to drainage and surgery...
January 2016: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy: Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy
Ian D Pavord, Paul W Jones, Pierre-Régis Burgel, Klaus F Rabe
Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are defined as sustained worsening of a patient's condition beyond normal day-to-day variations that is acute in onset, and that may also require a change in medication and/or hospitalization. Exacerbations have a significant and prolonged impact on health status and outcomes, and negative effects on pulmonary function. A significant proportion of exacerbations are unreported and therefore left untreated, leading to a poorer prognosis than those treated...
2016: International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
K D Kurz, G Ringstad, A Odland, R Advani, E Farbu, M W Kurz
Patients who suffer acute ischaemic stroke can be treated with thrombolysis if therapy is initiated early. Radiological evaluation of the intracranial tissue before such therapy can be given is mandatory. In this review current radiological diagnostic strategies are discussed for this patient group. Beyond non-enhanced computed tomography (CT), the standard imaging method for many years, more sophisticated CT stroke protocols including CT angiography and CT perfusion have been developed, and additionally an increasing number of patients are examined with magnetic resonance imaging as the first imaging method used...
January 2016: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
Joshua A Greenberg, Jonathan Hsu, Mohammad Bawazeer, John Marshall, Jan O Friedrich, Avery Nathens, Natalie Coburn, Gary R May, Emily Pearsall, Robin S McLeod
There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis...
April 2016: Canadian Journal of Surgery. Journal Canadien de Chirurgie
Hugh J Willison, Bart C Jacobs, Pieter A van Doorn
Guillain-Barré syndrome is the most common and most severe acute paralytic neuropathy, with about 100,000 people developing the disorder every year worldwide. Under the umbrella term of Guillain-Barré syndrome are several recognisable variants with distinct clinical and pathological features. The severe, generalised manifestation of Guillain-Barré syndrome with respiratory failure affects 20-30% of cases. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange is the optimal management approach, alongside supportive care...
August 13, 2016: Lancet
S Vincent Rajkumar, Shaji Kumar
The diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma has changed dramatically in the past decade. The disease definition has been updated to include highly specific biomarkers in addition to established markers of end-organ damage. The staging system has been revised to combine both measures of tumor burden and disease biology. Advances in therapy have resulted in a marked improvement in overall survival. New drugs introduced in the past few years include carfilzomib, pomalidomide, panobinostat, ixazomib, elotuzumab, and daratumumab...
January 2016: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Brad Spellberg, Arjun Srinivasan, Henry F Chambers
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 22, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Roberto Romero, Kypros Nicolaides, Agustin Conde-Agudelo, Ann Tabor, John M O'Brien, Elcin Cetingoz, Eduardo Da Fonseca, George W Creasy, Katharina Klein, Line Rode, Priya Soma-Pillay, Shalini Fusey, Cetin Cam, Zarko Alfirevic, Sonia S Hassan
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the use of vaginal progesterone in asymptomatic women with a sonographic short cervix (≤ 25 mm) in the midtrimester reduces the risk of preterm birth and improves neonatal morbidity and mortality. STUDY DESIGN: Individual patient data metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials. RESULTS: Five trials of high quality were included with a total of 775 women and 827 infants. Treatment with vaginal progesterone was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of preterm birth <33 weeks (relative risk [RR], 0...
February 2012: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Richard W Costello, Breda Cushen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Thorax
Timothy J Eviston, Glen R Croxson, Peter G E Kennedy, Tessa Hadlock, Arun V Krishnan
Bell's palsy is a common cranial neuropathy causing acute unilateral lower motor neuron facial paralysis. Immune, infective and ischaemic mechanisms are all potential contributors to the development of Bell's palsy, but the precise cause remains unclear. Advancements in the understanding of intra-axonal signal molecules and the molecular mechanisms underpinning Wallerian degeneration may further delineate its pathogenesis along with in vitro studies of virus-axon interactions. Recently published guidelines for the acute treatment of Bell's palsy advocate for steroid monotherapy, although controversy exists over whether combined corticosteroids and antivirals may possibly have a beneficial role in select cases of severe Bell's palsy...
December 2015: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Diabetes Care
Raphael R Bruno, Norbert Donner-Banzhoff, Wolfgang Söllner, Thomas Frieling, Christian Müller, Michael Christ
BACKGROUND: Acute chest pain of non-traumatic origin is a common reason for presentation to physician's offices and emergency rooms. Coronary heart disease is the cause in up to 25% of cases. Because acute chest pain, depending on its etiology, may be associated with a high risk of death, rapid, goal-oriented management is mandatory. METHODS: This review is based on pertinent articles and guidelines retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. RESULTS: History-taking, physical examination, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are the first steps in the differential diagnostic process and generally allow the identification of features signifying a high risk of lifethreatening illness...
November 6, 2015: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Ralph C Wang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Annals of Emergency Medicine
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