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Susanne H Sokolow, Elizabeth Huttinger, Nicolas Jouanard, Michael H Hsieh, Kevin D Lafferty, Armand M Kuris, Gilles Riveau, Simon Senghor, Cheikh Thiam, Alassane N'Diaye, Djibril Sarr Faye, Giulio A De Leo
Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite's intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam...
August 4, 2015: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Gabriel Rinaldi, Neil D Young, Jared D Honeycutt, Paul J Brindley, Robin B Gasser, Michael H Hsieh
Approximately 200,000,000 people have schistosomiasis (schistosome infection). Among the schistosomes, Schistosoma haematobium is responsible for the most infections, which are present in 110 million people globally, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. This pathogen causes an astonishing breadth of sequelae: hematuria, anemia, dysuria, stunting, uremia, bladder cancer, urosepsis, and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection. Refined estimates of the impact of schistosomiasis on quality of life suggest that it rivals malaria...
March 15, 2015: Journal of Infectious Diseases
Daniel G Colley, Amaya L Bustinduy, W Evan Secor, Charles H King
Human schistosomiasis--or bilharzia--is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring...
June 28, 2014: Lancet
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