Read by QxMD icon Read


shared collection
100 papers 25 to 100 followers
Thomas Godet, Russell Chabanne, Julien Marin, Sophie Kauffmann, Emmanuel Futier, Bruno Pereira, Jean-Michel Constantin
BACKGROUND: The decision to extubate brain-injured patients with residual impaired consciousness holds a high degree of uncertainty of success. The authors developed a pragmatic clinical score predictive of extubation failure in brain-injured patients. METHODS: One hundred and forty brain-injured patients were prospectively included after the first spontaneous breathing trial success. Assessment of multiparametric hemodynamic, respiratory, and neurologic functions was performed just before extubation...
October 3, 2016: Anesthesiology
Ramin R Tabatabai, Stuart P Swadron
There are a number of dangerous secondary causes of headaches that are life, limb, brain, or vision threatening that emergency physicians must consider in patients presenting with acute headache. Careful history and physical examination targeted at these important secondary causes of headache will help to avoid misdiagnosis in these patients. Patients with acute thunderclap headache have a differential diagnosis beyond subarachnoid hemorrhage. Considering the "context" of headache "PLUS" some other symptom or sign is one strategy to help focus the differential diagnosis...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Danya Khoujah, Michael K Abraham
The emergent evaluation and treatment of generalized convulsive status epilepticus presents challenges for emergency physicians. This disease is one of the few in which minutes can mean the difference between life and significant morbidity and mortality. It is imperative to use parallel processing and have multiple treatment options planned in advance, in case the current treatment is not successful. There is also benefit to exploring, or initiating, treatment algorithms to standardize the care for these critically ill patients...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Stephen J Traub, Eelco F Wijdicks
Coma represents a true medical emergency. Drug intoxications are a leading cause of coma; however, other metabolic disturbances and traumatic brain injury are also common causes. The general emergency department approach begins with stabilization of airway, breathing, and circulation, followed by a thorough physical examination to generate a limited differential diagnosis that is then refined by focused testing. Definitive treatment is ultimately disease-specific. This article presents an overview of the pathophysiology, causes, examination, and treatment of coma...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Lauren M Nentwich
Acute ischemic stroke is a challenging and time-sensitive diagnosis. Diagnosis begins with rapid detection of acute stroke symptoms by the patient, their family or caregivers, or bystanders. If acute stroke is suspected, EMS providers should be called for rapid assessment. EMS providers will utilize prehospital stroke tools to diagnose and determine potential stroke severity. Once at the hospital, the stroke team works rapidly to solidify the patient history, perform a focused neurologic examination and obtain necessary laboratory tests and brain imaging to accurately diagnose acute ischemic stroke and properly treat the patient...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Matthew S Siket
Although stroke declined from the third to fifth most common cause of death in the United States, the annual incidence and overall prevalence continue to increase. Since the available US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment options are time dependent, improving early stroke care may have more of a public health impact than any other phase of care. Timely and efficient stroke treatment should be a priority for emergency department and prehospital providers. This article discusses currently available and emerging treatment options in acute ischemic stroke focusing on the preservation of salvageable brain tissue, minimizing complications, and secondary prevention...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Andrea Morotti, Joshua N Goldstein
Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the deadliest type of stroke and up to half of patients die in hospital. Blood pressure management, coagulopathy reversal, and intracranial pressure control are the mainstays of acute ICH treatment. Prevention of hematoma expansion and minimally invasive hematoma evacuation are promising therapeutic strategies under investigation. This article provides an updated review on ICH diagnosis and management in the emergency department.
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Michael K Abraham, Wan-Tsu Wendy Chang
Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a neurological emergency with high risk of neurological decline and death. Although the presentation of a thunderclap headache or the worst headache of a patient's life easily triggers the evaluation for SAH, subtle presentations are still missed. The gold standard for diagnostic evaluation of SAH remains noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) followed by lumbar puncture if the CT is negative for SAH. Management of patients with SAH follows standard resuscitation of critically ill patients with the emphasis on reducing risks of rebleeding and avoiding secondary brain injuries...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Maia Dorsett, Stephen Y Liang
Central nervous system (CNS) infections, including meningitis, encephalitis, and brain abscess, are rare but time-sensitive emergency department (ED) diagnoses. Patients with CNS infection can present to the ED with nonspecific signs and symptoms, including headache, fever, altered mental status, and behavioral changes. Neuroimaging and CSF fluid analysis can appear benign early in the course of disease. Delaying therapy negatively impacts outcomes, particularly with bacterial meningitis and herpes simplex virus encephalitis...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Andrea G Edlow, Brian L Edlow, Jonathan A Edlow
Acute neurologic symptoms in pregnant and postpartum women may be caused by exacerbation of a preexisting neurologic condition, the initial presentation of a non-pregnancy-related problem, or a new neurologic problem. Pregnant and postpartum patients with headache and neurologic symptoms are often diagnosed with preeclampsia or eclampsia; however, other etiologies must also be considered. A team approach with close communication between emergency physicians, neurologists, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, and radiologists is the key to obtaining best outcomes...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Charles L Francoeur, Stephan A Mayer
For patients who survive the initial bleeding event of a ruptured brain aneurysm, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important causes of mortality and poor neurological outcome. New insights in the last decade have led to an important paradigm shift in the understanding of DCI pathogenesis. Large-vessel cerebral vasospasm has been challenged as the sole causal mechanism; new hypotheses now focus on the early brain injury, microcirculatory dysfunction, impaired autoregulation, and spreading depolarization...
October 14, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Samira Saadoun, Marios C Papadopoulos
This paper challenges the current management of acute traumatic spinal cord injury based on our experience with monitoring from the injury site in the neurointensive care unit. We argue that the concept of bony decompression is inadequate. The concept of optimum spinal cord perfusion pressure, which differs between patients, is introduced. Such variability suggests individualized patient treatment. Failing to optimize spinal cord perfusion limits the entry of systemically administered drugs into the injured cord...
October 5, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Paul S Chan, Robert A Berg, Yuanyuan Tang, Lesley H Curtis, John A Spertus
Importance: Therapeutic hypothermia is used for patients following both out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest. However, randomized trials on its efficacy for the in-hospital setting do not exist, and comparative effectiveness data are limited. Objective: To evaluate the association between therapeutic hypothermia and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Design, Setting, and Patients: In this cohort study, within the national Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, 26 183 patients successfully resuscitated from an in-hospital cardiac arrest between March 1, 2002, and December 31, 2014, and either treated or not treated with hypothermia at 355 US hospitals were identified...
October 4, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Deanna Saylor, Arun Venkatesan
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by the human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV). The disease occurs virtually exclusively in immunocompromised individuals, and, prior to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, was seen most commonly in the setting of HIV/AIDS. More recently, however, the incidence of PML in HIV-uninfected persons has increased with broader use of immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory medications utilized in a variety of systemic and neurologic autoimmune disorders...
November 2016: Current Infectious Disease Reports
Rodrigo Hasbun
Nosocomial meningitis can occur in association with central nervous system (CNS) devices such as cerebrospinal shunts or drains, intrathecal pumps, and deep brain stimulators and carry substantial morbidity and mortality. Diagnosing and treating these infections may be challenging to physicians as cerebrospinal fluid cultures may be negative due to previous antibiotic therapy and cerebrospinal abnormalities may be secondary to the primary neurosurgical issue that prompted the placement of the CNS device (e...
November 2016: Current Infectious Disease Reports
Taojun He, Samuel Kaplan, Mini Kamboj, Yi-Wei Tang
Central nervous system (CNS) infections are potentially life threatening if not diagnosed and treated early. The initial clinical presentations of many CNS infections are non-specific, making a definitive etiologic diagnosis challenging. Nucleic acid in vitro amplification-based molecular methods are increasingly being applied for routine microbial detection. These methods are a vast improvement over conventional techniques with the advantage of rapid turnaround and higher sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, molecular methods performed on cerebrospinal fluid samples are considered the new gold standard for diagnosis of CNS infection caused by pathogens, which are otherwise difficult to detect...
November 2016: Current Infectious Disease Reports
Beatrice Borsellino, Marcus J Schultz, Marcelo Gama de Abreu, Chiara Robba, Federico Bilotta
INTRODUCTION: Neurocritical care (NCC) patients often require prolonged mechanical ventilation, and they are at high risk of respiratory complications. Therefore, the potential benefit role of protective lung ventilation (PLV), which demonstrated to reduce postoperative complications in patients with acute distress respiratory syndrome, has been suggested even on NCC patients. However, PLV can increase intracranial pressure as result of permissive hypercapnia and of high airway pressures during recruitment maneuvers...
October 2016: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine
Victoria A McCredie, Aziz S Alali, Damon C Scales, Neill K J Adhikari, Gordon D Rubenfeld, Brian H Cuthbertson, Avery B Nathens
BACKGROUND: The optimal timing of tracheostomy placement in acutely brain-injured patients, who generally require endotracheal intubation for airway protection rather than respiratory failure, remains uncertain. We systematically reviewed trials comparing early tracheostomy to late tracheostomy or prolonged intubation in these patients. METHODS: We searched 5 databases (from inception to April 2015) to identify randomized controlled trials comparing early tracheostomy (≤10 days of intubation) with late tracheostomy (>10 days) or prolonged intubation in acutely brain-injured patients...
September 6, 2016: Neurocritical Care
Airton Leonardo de Oliveira Manoel, Alberto Goffi, Fernando Godinho Zampieri, David Turkel-Parrella, Abhijit Duggal, Thomas R Marotta, R Loch Macdonald, Simon Abrahamson
Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), defined as nontraumatic bleeding into the brain parenchyma, is the second most common subtype of stroke, with 5.3 million cases and over 3 million deaths reported worldwide in 2010. Case fatality is extremely high (reaching approximately 60 % at 1 year post event). Only 20 % of patients who survive are independent within 6 months. Factors such as chronic hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and anticoagulation are commonly associated with ICH. Chronic arterial hypertension represents the major risk factor for bleeding...
2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Bedros Taslakian, Houssein Darwish
Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world, particularly in the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, South America and central and south Europe. Intracranial hydatid disease is considered a rare disease and may be sometimes very difficult to diagnose based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the condition and the imaging findings even in the non-endemic parts of the world...
2016: BMJ Case Reports
2016-09-22 21:41:05
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"