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Mechanical Ventilation

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100 papers 25 to 100 followers
Thomas Godet, Russell Chabanne, Julien Marin, Sophie Kauffmann, Emmanuel Futier, Bruno Pereira, Jean-Michel Constantin
BACKGROUND: The decision to extubate brain-injured patients with residual impaired consciousness holds a high degree of uncertainty of success. The authors developed a pragmatic clinical score predictive of extubation failure in brain-injured patients. METHODS: One hundred and forty brain-injured patients were prospectively included after the first spontaneous breathing trial success. Assessment of multiparametric hemodynamic, respiratory, and neurologic functions was performed just before extubation...
October 3, 2016: Anesthesiology
Philippe Jolliet, Lamia Ouanes-Besbes, Fekri Abroug, Jalila Ben Khelil, Mohamed Besbes, Aude Garnero, Jean-Michel Arnal, Fabrice Daviaud, Jean-Daniel Chiche, Benoît Lortat-Jacob, Jean-Luc Diehl, Nicolas Lerolle, Alain Mercat, Keyvan Razazi, Christian Brun-Buisson, Isabelle Durand-Zaleski, Joëlle Texereau, Laurent Brochard
RATIONALE: During non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for COPD exacerbations, Helium/Oxygen (He/O2) reduces work of breathing and hypercapnia more than Air/O2 but impact on clinical outcome remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether continuous administration of He/O2 for 72 hours, during and in-between NIV sessions, is superior to Air/O2 in reducing NIV failure (25% to 15%) in severe hypercapnic COPD exacerbations. METHODS: Prospective, randomized, open-label trial (16 intensive care units, 6 countries)...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Jun Duan, Xiaoli Han, Shicong Huang, Linfu Bai
BACKGROUND: Reintubation is associated with high mortality. Identification of methods to avoid reintubation is needed. The aim of this study was to assess whether prophylactic noninvasive ventilation (NIV) would benefit patients with various cough strengths. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 356 patients who successfully passed a spontaneous breathing trial in a respiratory intensive care unit. Before extubation, cough peak flow was measured. After extubation, attending physicians determined whether the patients would receive prophylactic NIV or conventional oxygen treatment (control group)...
October 7, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Gonzalo Hernández, Concepción Vaquero, Laura Colinas, Rafael Cuena, Paloma González, Alfonso Canabal, Susana Sanchez, Maria Luisa Rodriguez, Ana Villasclaras, Rafael Fernández
Importance: High-flow conditioned oxygen therapy delivered through nasal cannulae and noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) may reduce the need for reintubation. Among the advantages of high-flow oxygen therapy are comfort, availability, lower costs, and additional physiopathological mechanisms. Objective: To test if high-flow conditioned oxygen therapy is noninferior to NIV for preventing postextubation respiratory failure and reintubation in patients at high risk of reintubation...
October 5, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Massimo Girardis, Stefano Busani, Elisa Damiani, Abele Donati, Laura Rinaldi, Andrea Marudi, Andrea Morelli, Massimo Antonelli, Mervyn Singer
Importance: Despite suggestions of potential harm from unnecessary oxygen therapy, critically ill patients spend substantial periods in a hyperoxemic state. A strategy of controlled arterial oxygenation is thus rational but has not been validated in clinical practice. Objective: To assess whether a conservative protocol for oxygen supplementation could improve outcomes in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Design, Setting, and Patients: Oxygen-ICU was a single-center, open-label, randomized clinical trial conducted from March 2010 to October 2012 that included all adults admitted with an expected length of stay of 72 hours or longer to the medical-surgical ICU of Modena University Hospital, Italy...
October 5, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
A Demoule, M Clavel, C Rolland-Debord, S Perbet, N Terzi, A Kouatchet, F Wallet, H Roze, F Vargas, C Guerin, J Dellamonica, S Jaber, L Brochard, T Similowski
PURPOSE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a ventilatory mode that tailors the level of assistance delivered by the ventilator to the electromyographic activity of the diaphragm. The objective of this study was to compare NAVA and pressure support ventilation (PSV) in the early phase of weaning from mechanical ventilation. METHODS: A multicentre randomized controlled trial of 128 intubated adults recovering from acute respiratory failure was conducted in 11 intensive care units...
September 30, 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
Savino Spadaro, Salvatore Grasso, Tommaso Mauri, Francesca Dalla Corte, Valentina Alvisi, Riccardo Ragazzi, Valentina Cricca, Giulia Biondi, Rossella Di Mussi, Elisabetta Marangoni, Carlo Alberto Volta
BACKGROUND: The rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI), which is the ratio between respiratory rate (RR) and tidal volume (VT), is one of the most widely used indices to predict weaning outcome. Whereas the diaphragm plays a fundamental role in generating VT, in the case of diaphragmatic dysfunction the inspiratory accessory muscles may contribute. If this occurs during a weaning trial, delayed weaning failure is likely since the accessory muscles are more fatigable than the diaphragm. Hence, we hypothesised that the traditional RSBI could be implemented by substituting VT with the ultrasonographic evaluation of diaphragmatic displacement (DD)...
September 28, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Beatrice Borsellino, Marcus J Schultz, Marcelo Gama de Abreu, Chiara Robba, Federico Bilotta
INTRODUCTION: Neurocritical care (NCC) patients often require prolonged mechanical ventilation, and they are at high risk of respiratory complications. Therefore, the potential benefit role of protective lung ventilation (PLV), which demonstrated to reduce postoperative complications in patients with acute distress respiratory syndrome, has been suggested even on NCC patients. However, PLV can increase intracranial pressure as result of permissive hypercapnia and of high airway pressures during recruitment maneuvers...
October 2016: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine
Laurent Brochard, Arthur Slutsky, Antonio Pesenti
Mechanical Ventilation (MV) is used to sustain life in patients with acute respiratory failure. A major concern in mechanically ventilated patients is the risk of Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI), which is partially prevented by lung protective ventilation. Spontaneously breathing, non-intubated, patients with acute respiratory failure may have a high respiratory drive and breathe with large tidal volumes and potentially injurious transpulmonary pressure swings. In patients with existing lung injury, regional forces generated by the respiratory muscles may lead to injurious effects on a regional level...
September 14, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Tao Wang, Lixi Zhang, Kai Luo, Jianqiang He, Yong Ma, Zongru Li, Na Zhao, Qun Xu, Yi Li, Xuezhong Yu
BACKGROUND: To determine the effects of noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) compared with invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) as the initial mechanical ventilation on clinical outcomes when used for treatment of acute respiratory failure (ARF) in immunocompromised patients. METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) and other databases. Subgroup analyses by disease severity and causes of immunodeficiency were also conducted...
2016: BMC Pulmonary Medicine
Anita K Simonds
Prevalence studies have shown heterogeneous use of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in different conditions, but a marked increase in uptake especially in users of non-invasive ventilation (NIV). While there have been randomised controlled trials of NIV in acute exacerbations of COPD, for weaning from invasive ventilation and post-extubation respiratory failure, the evidence base for long term NIV and comparisons with invasive ventilation are less well-developed. The combination of NIV and cough assist devices has reduced the indications for tracheotomy ventilation in some situations eg...
August 25, 2016: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
Telma C A Sequeira, Ahmed S BaHammam, Antonio M Esquinas
Obesity is a global epidemic that adversely affects respiratory physiology. Sleep-disordered breathing and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) are among the most common pulmonary complications related to obesity class III. Patients with OHS may present with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF) that necessitates immediate noninvasive ventilation (NIV) or invasive ventilation and intensive care unit (ICU) monitoring. The OHS is underrecognized as a cause of AHRF. The management of mechanical ventilation in obese ICU patients is one of the most challenging problems facing respirologists, intensivists, and anesthesiologists...
August 15, 2016: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
Manjush Karthika, Farhan A Al Enezi, Lalitha V Pillai, Yaseen M Arabi
Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value...
July 2016: Annals of Thoracic Medicine
John M Trahanas, William R Lynch, Robert H Bartlett
In the past the only option for the treatment of respiratory failure due to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (aeCOPD) was invasive mechanical ventilation. In recent decades, the potential for extracorporeal carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been realized. We review the various types of extracorporeal CO2 removal, outline the optimal use of these therapies for aeCOPD, and make suggestions for future controlled trials. We also describe the advantages and requirements for an ideal long-term ambulatory CO2 removal system for palliation of COPD...
August 10, 2016: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
Alicia Jeanette Fischer, Sven Kaese, Pia Lebiedz
In the general population, prevalence of obesity is increasing continuously. Concomitantly, a growing number of obese patients with severe illnesses presents at intensive care units (ICU). Particularly respiratory management of this patient group poses a challenge to intensive care physicians because of differences in respiratory anatomy and physiology in obese compared to non-obese individuals. Aim of this review is to present treatment options for critically ill obese patients requiring mechanical ventilation based on current studies concerning patient positioning, ventilatory regimen as well as extended therapy with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)...
August 2016: Respiratory Medicine
Fernando G Zampieri, Bruno Mazza
Sepsis is the main cause of close to 70% of all cases of acute respiratory distress syndromes (ARDS). In addition, sepsis increases susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury. Therefore, the development of a ventilatory strategy that can achieve adequate oxygenation without injuring the lungs is highly sought after for patients with acute infection and represents an important therapeutic window to improve patient care. Suboptimal ventilatory settings can not only harm the lung, but may also contribute to the cascade of organ failure in sepsis due to organ crosstalk...
July 21, 2016: Shock
Souvik Maitra, Anirban Som, Sulagna Bhattacharjee, Mahesh K Arora, Dalim K Baidya
PURPOSE: The role of high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) therapy in adult patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure is controversial. METHODS: This meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been designed to compare HFNO with noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and conventional oxygen therapy in such patients. RESULTS: Initial database searching revealed 336 RCTs, of which 7 were included in this meta-analysis. Five RCTs compared HFNO with standard oxygen therapy, one compared HFNO with NIV, and one compared all three...
October 2016: Journal of Critical Care
Oriol Roca, Jonathan Messika, Berta Caralt, Marina García-de-Acilu, Benjamin Sztrymf, Jean-Damien Ricard, Joan R Masclans
PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to describe early predictors and to develop a prediction tool that accurately identifies the need for mechanical ventilation (MV) in pneumonia patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (ARF) treated with high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a 4-year prospective observational 2-center cohort study including patients with severe pneumonia treated with HFNC. High-flow nasal cannula failure was defined as need for MV...
October 2016: Journal of Critical Care
G F Curley, J G Laffey, H Zhang, A S Slutsky
The pathophysiological mechanisms by which mechanical ventilation can contribute to lung injury - termed ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) - is increasingly well understood. "Biotrauma" describes release of mediators by injurious ventilatory strategies, which can lead to lung and distal organ injury. Insights from preclinical models demonstrating that traditional high tidal volumes drove the inflammatory response helped lead to clinical trials demonstrating lower mortality in patients ventilated with a lower tidal volume strategy...
July 28, 2016: Chest
Juan F Masa, Isabel Utrabo, Javier Gomez de Terreros, Myriam Aburto, Cristóbal Esteban, Enric Prats, Belén Núñez, Ángel Ortega-González, Luis Jara-Palomares, M Jesus Martin-Vicente, Eva Farrero, Alicia Binimelis, Ernest Sala, José C Serrano-Rebollo, Emilia Barrot, Raquel Sánchez-Oro-Gomez, Ramón Fernández-Álvarez, Francisco Rodríguez-Jerez, Javier Sayas, Pedro Benavides, Raquel Català, Francisco J Rivas, Carlos J Egea, Antonio Antón, Patricia Peñacoba, Ana Santiago-Recuerda, M A Gómez-Mendieta, Lidia Méndez, José J Cebrian, Juan A Piña, Enrique Zamora, Gonzalo Segrelles
BACKGROUND: Severe acidosis can cause noninvasive ventilation (NIV) failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF). NIV is therefore contraindicated outside of intensive care units (ICUs) in these patients. Less is known about NIV failure in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). Therefore, the objective of the present study was to compare NIV failure rates between patients with severe and non-severe acidosis admitted to a respiratory intermediate care unit (RICU) with AHRF resulting from ACPE, COPD or OHS...
2016: BMC Pulmonary Medicine
2016-07-10 22:14:03
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