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Mechanical Ventilation

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139 papers 100 to 500 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28061910/use-of-noninvasive-ventilation-in-immunocompromised-patients-with-acute-respiratory-failure-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#1
Hui-Bin Huang, Biao Xu, Guang-Yun Liu, Jian-Dong Lin, Bin Du
BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory failure (ARF) remains a common hazardous complication in immunocompromised patients and is associated with increased mortality rates when endotracheal intubation is needed. We aimed to evaluate the effect of early noninvasive ventilation (NIV) compared with oxygen therapy alone in this patient population. METHODS: We searched for relevant studies in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane database up to 25 July 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they reported data on any of the predefined outcomes in immunocompromised patients managed with NIV or oxygen therapy alone...
January 7, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27973930/comorbidities-and-subgroups-of-patients-surviving-severe-acute-hypercapnic-respiratory-failure-in-the-icu
#2
Dan Adler, Jean-Louis Pépin, Elise Dupuis-Lozeron, Katerina Espa-Cervena, Roselyne Merlet-Violet, Hajo Muller, Jean-Paul Janssens, Laurent Brochard
RATIONALE: No methodical assessment of the lung, cardiac and sleep function of patients surviving an acute hypercapnic respiratory failure episode requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) has been reported in the literature. OBJECTIVES: To prospectively investigate the prevalence and impact of comorbidities in patients treated by mechanical ventilator support (invasive or non-invasive) for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in the ICU. METHODS: Seventy-eight consecutive patients admitted for an episode of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure underwent an assessment of lung, cardiac and sleep function by pulmonary function tests, transthoracic echocardiography and polysomnography 3 months after ICU discharge...
December 14, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28007622/control-of-ventilation-in-health-and-disease
#3
REVIEW
Susmita Chowdhuri, M Safwan Badr
Control of ventilation occurs at different levels of the respiratory system via a negative feedback system that allows for precise regulation of levels of arterial carbon dioxide and oxygen. Mechanisms for ventilatory instability leading to sleep disordered breathing include changes in respiratory rhythm genesis and chemoresponsiveness to hypoxia and hypercapnia, cerebrovascular reactivity, abnormal chest wall and airway reflexes, and sleep state oscillations. One can potentially stabilize breathing during sleep-related breathing disorders by identifying one or more of these pathophysiological mechanisms...
December 19, 2016: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891061/noninvasive-positive-pressure-ventilation-in-chronic-heart-failure
#4
REVIEW
Hao Jiang, Yi Han, Chenqi Xu, Jun Pu, Ben He
Instruction and Objectives. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) alleviates sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and it may improve cardiac function in SDB patients. Because large randomized controlled trials directly evaluating the impact of NPPV on cardiac function are lacking, we conducted a meta-analysis of published data on effectiveness of NPPV in improving cardiac function in patients with chronic heart failure regardless of SDB presence. Methods. Controlled trials were identified in PubMed, OVID, and EMBASE databases...
2016: Canadian Respiratory Journal: Journal of the Canadian Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886577/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-vs-conventional-oxygen-therapy-in-cardiac-surgical-patients-a-meta-analysis
#5
Youfeng Zhu, Haiyan Yin, Rui Zhang, Jianrui Wei
INTRODUCTION: The use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) for the treatment of many diseases has gained increasing popularity. In the present meta-analysis, we aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of HFNCs compared with conventional oxygen therapy (COT) in adult postextubation cardiac surgical patients. METHOD: We reviewed the Embase, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Wanfang databases, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Two investigators independently collected the data and assessed the quality of each study...
November 9, 2016: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903667/experiences-of-noninvasive-ventilation-in-adults-with-hypercapnic-respiratory-failure-a-review-of-evidence
#6
REVIEW
Hamadziripi Ngandu, Nichola Gale, Jane B Hopkinson
Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has been shown to be beneficial for patients with respiratory failure; however, many patients fail to tolerate it and require other interventions. The objective of this thematic synthesis was to describe the nature of NIV experiences in adults with hypercapnic respiratory failure. A systematic, computerised literature search of English-language databases was undertaken with no restriction on date of publication. A total of 99 papers was identified and screened for eligibility from databases including CINAHL, Medline and PsycINFO, and some were hand searched...
December 2016: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898437/how-best-to-set-the-ventilator-on-extracorporeal-membrane-lung-oxygenation
#7
Luciano Gattinoni, Tommaso Tonetti, Michael Quintel
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Extracorporeal respiratory support in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome is applied either as rescue maneuver for life-threatening hypoxemia or as a tool to reduce the harm of mechanical ventilation. Depending on the blood and gas flow, extracorporeal support may completely substitute the natural lung as a gas exchanger (high-flow venovenous bypass) or reduce the need for mechanical ventilation, enabling the removal of a fraction of the metabolically produced CO2...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898438/rescue-therapies-for-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-what-to-try-first
#8
Onnen Moerer, Tommaso Tonetti, Michael Quintel
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Severe respiratory failure due to the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) might require rescue therapy measures beyond even extended standard care to ensure adequate oxygenation and survival. This review provides a summary and assessment of treatment options that can be beneficial when the standard approach fails. RECENT FINDINGS: 'Life-threatening' conditions or refractory hypoxemia during mechanical ventilation are more a matter of personal rating than an objective diagnosis based on defined and/or unanimously agreed thresholds that would mandate the use of rescue therapies...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27879383/high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-critically-ill-subjects-with-or-at-risk-for-respiratory-failure-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#9
REVIEW
Wagner Luis Nedel, Caroline Deutschendorf, Edison Moraes Rodrigues Filho
High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen delivery has been gaining attention as an alternative means of respiratory support for critically ill patients, with recent studies suggesting equivalent outcomes when compared with other forms of oxygen therapy delivery. The main objective of this review was to extract current data about the efficacy of HFNC in critically ill subjects with or at risk for respiratory failure. We performed a systematic review of publications (from database inception to October 2015) that evaluated HFNC in critically ill subjects with or at risk for acute respiratory failure and performed a meta-analysis comparing HFNC with noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and with standard oxygen therapy regarding major outcomes: incidence of invasive mechanical ventilation and ICU mortality...
January 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875410/should-we-use-driving-pressure-to-set-tidal-volume
#10
Domenico L Grieco, Lu Chen, Martin Dres, Laurent Brochard
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) can occur despite use of tidal volume (VT) limited to 6 ml/kg of predicted body weight, especially in patients with a smaller aerated compartment (i.e. the baby lung) in which, indeed, tidal ventilation takes place. Because respiratory system static compliance (CRS) is mostly affected by the volume of the baby lung, the ratio VT/CRS (i.e. the driving pressure, ΔP) may potentially help tailoring interventions on VT setting. RECENT FINDINGS: Driving pressure is the ventilatory variable most strongly associated with changes in survival and has been shown to be the key mediator of the effects of mechanical ventilation on outcome in the acute respiratory distress syndrome...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870576/airway-management-strategies-for-brain-injured-patients-meeting-standard-criteria-to-consider-extubation-a-prospective-cohort-study
#11
Victoria A McCredie, Niall D Ferguson, Ruxandra L Pinto, Neill K J Adhikari, Robert A Fowler, Martin G Chapman, Althea Burrell, Andrew J Baker, Deborah J Cook, Maureen O Meade, Damon C Scales
RATIONALE: Patients with acute brain injury are frequently capable of breathing spontaneously with minimal ventilatory support despite persistent neurological impairment. OBJECTIVES: We sought to describe factors associated with extubation timing, success, and primary tracheostomy in these patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective multicenter observational cohort study in three academic hospitals in Toronto, Canada. Consecutive brain-injured adults receiving mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours in three intensive care units were screened by study personnel daily for extubation consideration criteria...
January 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852952/a-randomised-controlled-trial-of-cpap-versus-non-invasive-ventilation-for-initial-treatment-of-obesity-hypoventilation-syndrome
#12
Mark E Howard, Amanda J Piper, Bronwyn Stevens, Anne E Holland, Brendon J Yee, Eli Dabscheck, Duncan Mortimer, Angela T Burge, Daniel Flunt, Catherine Buchan, Linda Rautela, Nicole Sheers, David Hillman, David J Berlowitz
BACKGROUND: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is the most common indication for home ventilation, although the optimal therapy remains unclear, particularly for severe disease. We compared Bi-level and continuous positive airways pressure (Bi-level positive airway pressure (PAP); CPAP) for treatment of severe OHS. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre, parallel, double-blind trial for initial treatment of OHS, with participants randomised to nocturnal Bi-level PAP or CPAP for 3 months...
November 15, 2016: Thorax
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27846872/challenges-on-non-invasive-ventilation-to-treat-acute-respiratory-failure-in-the-elderly
#13
REVIEW
Raffaele Scala
Acute respiratory failure is a frequent complication in elderly patients especially if suffering from chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation constitutes a successful therapeutic tool in the elderly as, like in younger patients, it is able to prevent endotracheal intubation in a wide range of acute conditions; moreover, this ventilator technique is largely applied in the elderly in whom invasive mechanical ventilation is considered not appropriated. Furthermore, the integration of new technological devices, ethical issues and environment of treatment are still largely debated in the treatment of acute respiratory failure in the elderly...
November 15, 2016: BMC Pulmonary Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842742/design-features-of-modern-mechanical-ventilators
#14
REVIEW
Neil MacIntyre
A positive-pressure breath ideally should provide a VT that is adequate for gas exchange and appropriate muscle unloading while minimizing any risk for injury or discomfort. The latest generation of ventilators uses sophisticated feedback systems to sculpt positive-pressure breaths according to patient effort and respiratory system mechanics. Currently, however, these new control strategies are not totally closed-loop systems. This is because the automatic input variables remain limited, some clinician settings are still required, and the specific features of the perfect breath design still are not entirely clear...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842743/assessing-respiratory-system-mechanical-function
#15
REVIEW
Ruben D Restrepo, Diana M Serrato, Rodrigo Adasme
The main goals of assessing respiratory system mechanical function are to evaluate the lung function through a variety of methods and to detect early signs of abnormalities that could affect the patient's outcomes. In ventilated patients, it has become increasingly important to recognize whether respiratory function has improved or deteriorated, whether the ventilator settings match the patient's demand, and whether the selection of ventilator parameters follows a lung-protective strategy. Ventilator graphics, esophageal pressure, intra-abdominal pressure, and electric impedance tomography are some of the best-known monitoring tools to obtain measurements and adequately evaluate the respiratory system mechanical function...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842744/ventilator-induced-lung-injury
#16
REVIEW
Jeremy R Beitler, Atul Malhotra, B Taylor Thompson
Prevention of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) can attenuate multiorgan failure and improve survival in at-risk patients. Clinically significant VILI occurs from volutrauma, barotrauma, atelectrauma, biotrauma, and shear strain. Differences in regional mechanics are important in VILI pathogenesis. Several interventions are available to protect against VILI. However, most patients at risk of lung injury do not develop VILI. VILI occurs most readily in patients with concomitant physiologic insults. VILI prevention strategies must balance risk of lung injury with untoward side effects from the preventive effort, and may be most effective when targeted to subsets of patients at increased risk...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842745/managing-acute-lung-injury
#17
REVIEW
Gregory A Schmidt
The foundation of mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome involves limiting lung overdistention by using small tidal volumes or transpulmonary pressures. Potential for additional lung recruitment with higher positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) should be assessed. When stress index indicates tidal recruitment-derecruitment, PEEP is increased to higher values. Alternatively, a high PEEP table is used in all patients. When these conventional approaches are insufficient to sustain acceptable gas exchange, rescue is attempted using extracorporeal therapies, airway pressure-release ventilation, inhaled vasodilators, or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842746/managing-respiratory-failure-in-obstructive-lung-disease
#18
REVIEW
Stephen P Bergin, Craig R Rackley
Exacerbations of obstructive lung disease are common causes of acute respiratory failure. Short-acting bronchodilators and systemic glucocorticoids are the foundation of pharmacologic management. For patients requiring ventilator support, use of noninvasive ventilation reduces the risk of mortality and progression to invasive mechanical ventilation. Challenges associated with invasive ventilation include ventilator dyssynchrony, air trapping, and dynamic hyperinflation. Careful monitoring and adjustment of ventilatory support parameters helps to optimize the patient-ventilator interaction and minimizes the risk of associated morbidity...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842747/patient-ventilator-interactions
#19
REVIEW
Daniel Gilstrap, John Davies
Ventilatory muscle fatigue is a reversible loss of the ability to generate force or velocity of contraction in response to increased elastic and resistive loads. Mechanical ventilation should provide support without imposing additional loads from the ventilator (dys-synchrony). Interactive breaths optimize this relationship but require that patient effort and the ventilator response be synchronous during breath initiation, flow delivery, and termination. Proper delivery considers all 3 phases and uses clinical data, ventilator graphics, and sometimes a trial-and-error approach to optimize patient-ventilator interactions...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842749/mechanical-ventilator-discontinuation-process
#20
REVIEW
Lingye Chen, Daniel Gilstrap, Christopher E Cox
The goal of this article is to discuss approaches to discontinuing invasive mechanical ventilation in a general intensive care unit (ICU) population. It considers approaches in which the clinician expects patient survival, as well as those that do not. Additionally, approaches to acute and chronic critical illness are included.
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
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