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162 papers 25 to 100 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27848094/aminoglycoside-induced-nephrotoxicity-in-children
#1
REVIEW
Stephen J McWilliam, Daniel J Antoine, Rosalind L Smyth, Munir Pirmohamed
Aminoglycoside antibiotics, in particular gentamicin and tobramycin, are still commonly used in paediatric clinical practice. These drugs cause nephrotoxicity, which particularly affects the proximal tubule epithelial cells due to selective endocytosis and accumulation of aminoglycosides via the multi-ligand receptor megalin. Recent epidemiological studies, using more widely accepted definitions of acute kidney injury (AKI), have suggested that AKI may occur in between 20 and 33 % of children exposed to aminoglycosides...
November 15, 2016: Pediatric Nephrology: Journal of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27789117/acute-ataxia-in-children-a-review-of-the-differential-diagnosis-and-evaluation-in-the-emergency-department
#2
REVIEW
Mauro Caffarelli, Amir A Kimia, Alcy R Torres
Acute ataxia in a pediatric patient poses a diagnostic dilemma for any physician. While the most common etiologies are benign, occasional individuals require urgent intervention. Children with stroke, toxic ingestion, infection, and neuro-inflammatory disorders frequently exhibit ataxia as an essential-if not the only-presenting feature. The available retrospective research utilize inconsistent definitions of acute ataxia, precluding the ability to pool data from these studies. No prospective data exist that report on patients presenting to the emergency department with ataxia...
December 2016: Pediatric Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27803143/stroke-in-neonates-and-children
#3
Miya E Bernson-Leung, Michael J Rivkin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Pediatrics in Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27832304/the-challenging-sonographic-inguinal-canal-evaluation-in-neonates-and-children-an-update-of-differential-diagnoses
#4
Yoshino T Sameshima, Maurício G I Yamanari, Mariana A Silva, Miguel J Francisco Neto, Marcelo B G Funari
Bulging of the inguinal region is a frequent complaint in the pediatric population and sonographic findings can be challenging for radiologists. In this review we update the sonographic findings of the most common disorders that affect the inguinal canal in neonates and children, with a focus on the processus vaginalis abnormalities such as congenital hydroceles, indirect inguinal hernias and cryptorchidism, illustrated with cases collected at a quaternary hospital during a 7-year period. We emphasize the importance of correctly classifying different types of congenital hydrocele and inguinal hernia to allow for early surgical intervention when necessary...
November 10, 2016: Pediatric Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27816145/infection-prevention-and-control-in-healthcare-part-ii-epidemiology-and-prevention-of-infections
#5
EDITORIAL
Keith S Kaye, Sorabh Dhar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27462838/acute-rheumatic-fever-an-evidence-based-approach-to-diagnosis-and-initial-management
#6
Kajal Khanna, Deborah R Liu
Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory reaction involving the joints, heart, and nervous system that occurs after a group A streptococcal infection. It typically presents as a febrile illness with clinical manifestations that could include arthritis, carditis, skin lesions, or abnormal movements. Of these, the cardiac manifestations of acute rheumatic fever are most concerning, as children may present in acute heart failure and may go on to develop valvular insufficiency or stenosis. Because this is a rare presentation to emergency departments in developed countries, it is crucial for clinicians to keep a broad differential when presented with clinical presentations suspicious for acute rheumatic fever...
August 2016: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27056781/kawasaki-disease
#7
REVIEW
Jane W Newburger, Masato Takahashi, Jane C Burns
Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown etiology that occurs predominantly in infants and children. If not treated early with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, 1 in 5 children develop coronary artery aneurysms; this risk is reduced 5-fold if intravenous immunoglobulin is administered within 10 days of fever onset. Coronary artery aneurysms evolve dynamically over time, usually reaching a peak dimension by 6 weeks after illness onset. Almost all the morbidity and mortality occur in patients with giant aneurysms...
April 12, 2016: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27670788/acute-kidney-injury-2016-diagnosis-and-diagnostic-workup
#8
Marlies Ostermann, Michael Joannidis
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with serious short- and long-term complications. Early diagnosis and identification of the underlying aetiology are essential to guide management. In this review, we outline the current definition of AKI and the potential pitfalls, and summarise the existing and future tools to investigate AKI in critically ill patients.
September 27, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27647841/when-should-i-suspect-childhood-leukaemia
#9
EDITORIAL
Philip Connor
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27618882/the-hypoxia-response-pathways-hats-off
#10
M Celeste Simon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 13, 2016: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27572861/pediatric-transverse-myelitis
#11
Michael Absoud, Benjamin M Greenberg, Ming Lim, Tim Lotze, Terrence Thomas, Kumaran Deiva
Pediatric acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is an immune-mediated CNS disorder and contributes to 20% of children experiencing a first acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS). ATM must be differentiated from other presentations of myelopathy and may be the first presentation of relapsing ADS such as neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or multiple sclerosis (MS). The tenets of the diagnostic criteria for ATM established by the Transverse Myelitis Consortium Working Group can generally be applied in children; however, a clear sensory level may not be evident in some...
August 30, 2016: Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27647842/clinical-presentation-of-childhood-leukaemia-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#12
Rachel T Clarke, Ann Van den Bruel, Clare Bankhead, Christopher D Mitchell, Bob Phillips, Matthew J Thompson
OBJECTIVE: Leukaemia is the most common cancer of childhood, accounting for a third of cases. In order to assist clinicians in its early detection, we systematically reviewed all existing data on its clinical presentation and estimated the frequency of signs and symptoms presenting at or prior to diagnosis. DESIGN: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for all studies describing presenting features of leukaemia in children (0-18 years) without date or language restriction, and, when appropriate, meta-analysed data from the included studies...
October 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27567896/severe-community-acquired-pneumonia-timely-management-measures-in-the-first-24-hours
#13
REVIEW
Jason Phua, Nathan C Dean, Qi Guo, Win Sen Kuan, Hui Fang Lim, Tow Keang Lim
Mortality rates for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) range from 17 to 48 % in published studies.In this review, we searched PubMed for relevant papers published between 1981 and June 2016 and relevant files. We explored how early and aggressive management measures, implemented within 24 hours of recognition of severe CAP and carried out both in the emergency department and in the ICU, decrease mortality in severe CAP.These measures begin with the use of severity assessment tools and the application of care bundles via clinical decision support tools...
August 28, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27609020/pneumatosis-intestinalis
#14
Tianyou Yang, Jiliang Yang, Tianbao Tan, Jing Pan, Chao Hu, Yan Zou
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 8, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27601403/cutaneous-manifestations-of-mucopolysaccharidoses
#15
Mimi C Tran, Joseph M Lam
Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) are a group of inherited lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficiencies in specific enzymes involved in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). These deficiencies cause excessive metabolites to accumulate in multiple organs. There are eight different MPS disorders, contributing to the wide variation in clinical presentation. Depending on the severity and subtype of the disease, some children live normal life spans, while others have a more grim prognosis. Children with MPS can present with neurologic, behavioral, skeletal, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or respiratory abnormalities...
September 7, 2016: Pediatric Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27606958/ethical-issues-in-pediatric-genetic-testing-and-screening
#16
Jeffrey R Botkin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Developments in genetic test technologies enable a detailed analysis of the genomes of individuals across the range of human development from embryos to adults with increased precision and lower cost. These powerful technologies raise a number of ethical issues in pediatrics, primarily because of the frequent lack of clinical utility of genetic information, the generation of secondary results and questions over the proper scope of parental authority for testing. RECENT FINDINGS: Several professional organizations in the fields of genetics and pediatrics have published new guidance on the ethical, legal, and policy issues relevant to genetic testing in children...
December 2016: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27321363/antibiotic-duration-and-timing-of-the-switch-from-intravenous-to-oral-route-for-bacterial-infections-in-children-systematic-review-and-guidelines
#17
REVIEW
Brendan J McMullan, David Andresen, Christopher C Blyth, Minyon L Avent, Asha C Bowen, Philip N Britton, Julia E Clark, Celia M Cooper, Nigel Curtis, Emma Goeman, Briony Hazelton, Gabrielle M Haeusler, Ameneh Khatami, James P Newcombe, Joshua Osowicki, Pamela Palasanthiran, Mike Starr, Tony Lai, Clare Nourse, Joshua R Francis, David Isaacs, Penelope A Bryant
Few studies are available to inform duration of intravenous antibiotics for children and when it is safe and appropriate to switch to oral antibiotics. We have systematically reviewed antibiotic duration and timing of intravenous to oral switch for 36 paediatric infectious diseases and developed evidence-graded recommendations on the basis of the review, guidelines, and expert consensus. We searched databases and obtained information from references identified and relevant guidelines. All eligible studies were assessed for quality...
August 2016: Lancet Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27587638/acid-base-disorders
#18
Benson S Hsu, Saquib A Lakhani, Michael Wilhelm
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Pediatrics in Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26799351/management-of-sleep-disorders-in-children-with-neurodevelopmental-disorders-a-review
#19
REVIEW
Allison Beck Blackmer, James A Feinstein
Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are defined as a group of disorders caused by changes in early brain development, resulting in behavioral and cognitive alterations in sensory and motor systems, speech, and language. NDDs affect approximately 1-2% of the general population. Up to 80% of children with NDDs are reported to have disrupted sleep; subsequent deleterious effects on daytime behaviors, cognition, growth, and overall development of the child are commonly reported. Examples of NDDs discussed in this review include autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, Rett syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Smith-Magenis syndrome...
January 2016: Pharmacotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27303658/history-of-nephrotic-syndrome-and-evolution-of-its-treatment
#20
REVIEW
Abhijeet Pal, Frederick Kaskel
The recognition, evaluation, and early treatment of nephrotic syndrome in infants and children originate from physicians dating back to Hippocrates. It took nearly another 1000 years before the condition was described for its massive edema requiring treatment with herbs and other remedies. A rich history of observations and interpretations followed over the course of centuries until the recognition of the combination of clinical findings of foamy urine and swelling of the body, and measurements of urinary protein and blood analyses showed the phenotypic characteristics of the syndrome that were eventually linked to the early anatomic descriptions from first kidney autopsies and then renal biopsy analyses...
2016: Frontiers in Pediatrics
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