Read by QxMD icon Read


shared collection
44 papers 0 to 25 followers
By Nico Kolokythas PhD Researcher in Strength & Conditioning
Christopher M Jones, Peter C Griffiths, Stephen D Mellalieu
BACKGROUND: Coaches, sport scientists, clinicians and medical personnel face a constant challenge to prescribe sufficient training load to produce training adaption while minimising fatigue, performance inhibition and risk of injury/illness. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to investigate the relationship between injury and illness and longitudinal training load and fatigue markers in sporting populations. METHODS: Systematic searches of the Web of Science and PubMed online databases to August 2015 were conducted for articles reporting relationships between training load/fatigue measures and injury/illness in athlete populations...
September 28, 2016: Sports Medicine
Damien McKay, Carolyn Broderick, Katharine Steinbeck
With the advent of long term athlete development programs and early sport specialisation, the training of elite athletes now spans the period of adolescence. Adolescence represents a period of physical, psychosocial and cognitive development, but also a time of physical and psychological vulnerability. Changes in skeletal and physiological attributes coincide with an increased risk of sport related injury. A window of vulnerability is shaped by the properties of the musculoskeletal system, the influence of pubertal hormones and the lag time between physical and cognitive development...
October 5, 2016: Pediatric Exercise Science
Masafumi Terada, Kyle B Kosik, Ryan S McCann, Phillip A Gribble
INTRODUCTION/PURPOSE: Previous investigations have identified impaired trunk and postural stability in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). The diaphragm muscle contributes to trunk and postural stability by modulating the intra-abdominal pressure. A potential mechanism that could help to explain trunk and postural stability deficits may be related to altered diaphragm function due to supraspinal sensorimotor changes with CAI. The purpose of this study was to examine the diaphragm contractility in individuals with CAI and healthy controls...
October 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Breann K Tisano, A Reed Estes
In the hypercompetitive environment of year round youth baseball, arm pain is commonplace. Although much research has been done about injuries in the overhead throwing athlete, the emphasis has been on the more elite levels, where athletes have reached full development. The anatomy of the skeletally immature athlete, including open physeal plates and increased tissue laxity, raises unique issues in the presentation and treatment of repetitive throwing injuries of the elbow and shoulder. With a focus on "little leaguers," this discussion evaluates five of the most common elbow and shoulder injuries-Little Leaguer's elbow, ulnar collateral ligament sprain or tear, osteochondritis dissecans/Panner's disease, Little Leaguer's shoulder, and multidirectional instability...
October 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
David R Bell, Stephanie M Trigsted, Eric G Post, Courtney E Walden
PURPOSE: Quadriceps strength deficits persist for years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and patients with these deficits often shift torque demands away from the knee extensors to the hip during functional tasks. However, it is not clear how quadriceps strength deficits may affect hip strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate differences in lower extremity strength in individuals with ACL reconstruction with differing levels of quadriceps strength asymmetry...
October 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Polyvios Kyritsis, Roald Bahr, Philippe Landreau, Riadh Miladi, Erik Witvrouw
BACKGROUND: The decision as to whether or not an athlete is ready to return to sport (RTS) after ACL reconstruction is difficult as the commonly used RTS criteria have not been validated. PURPOSE: To evaluate whether a set of objective discharge criteria, including muscle strength and functional tests, are associated with risk of ACL graft rupture after RTS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 158 male professional athletes who underwent an ACL reconstruction and returned to their previous professional level of sport were included...
August 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Michael K Drew, Jill Cook, Caroline F Finch
Training loads contribute to sports injury risk but their mitigation has rarely been considered in a sports injury prevention framework. A key concept behind monitoring training loads for injury prevention is to screen for those at increased risk of injury so that workloads can be adjusted to minimise these risks. This review describes how advances in management of workload can be applied as a preventive measure. Primary prevention involves screening for preparticipation load risk factors, such as low training loads, prior to a training period or competition...
May 10, 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Hege Grindem, Lynn Snyder-Mackler, Håvard Moksnes, Lars Engebretsen, May Arna Risberg
BACKGROUND: Knee reinjury after ACL reconstruction is common and increases the risk of osteoarthritis. There is sparse evidence to guide return to sport (RTS) decisions in this population. OBJECTIVES: To assess the relationship between knee reinjury after ACL reconstruction and (1) return to level I sports, (2) timing of RTS and (3) knee function prior to return. METHODS: 106 patients who participated in pivoting sports participated in this prospective 2-year cohort study...
July 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Catherine Y Wild, Bridget J Munro, Julie R Steele
Despite an increase in anterior knee laxity (AKL) during the adolescent growth spurt in girls, it is unknown whether landing biomechanics are affected by this change. This study investigated whether pubescent girls with higher AKL displayed differences in their lower limb strength or landing biomechanics when performing a horizontal leap movement compared to girls with lower AKL. Forty-six pubescent girls (10-13 years) were tested at the time of their peak height velocity (PHV). Passive AKL was quantified and used to classify participants into higher (HAKL; peak displacement > 4 mm) and lower (LAKL; peak displacement < 3 mm) AKL groups (n = 15/group)...
March 28, 2016: Journal of Sports Sciences
Dustin Nabhan, Taylor Walden, Jenna Street, Heather Linden, Bill Moreau
BACKGROUND: To describe injury and illness incidence from the US Youth Olympic Team during the 2014 Youth Olympic Games (YOG). METHODS: Electronic health records of Team USA athletes registered for the YOG were reviewed for patient encounters during the 2014 YOG. Medical encounters were defined as all medical services provided by a healthcare provider including evaluation, treatment and prophylactic services. All medical conditions were categorised by IOC Injury and Illness reporting criteria...
June 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Roald Bahr
This paper addresses if and how a periodic health examination to screen for risk factors for injury can be used to mitigate injury risk. The key question asked is whether it is possible to use screening tests to identify who is at risk for a sports injury-in order to address the deficit through a targeted intervention programme. The paper demonstrates that to validate a screening test to predict and prevent sports injuries, at least 3 steps are needed. First, a strong relationship needs to be demonstrated in prospective studies between a marker from a screening test and injury risk (step 1)...
July 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Craig L Jacobs, J David Cassidy, Pierre Côté, Eleanor Boyle, Eva Ramel, Carlo Ammendolia, Jan Hartvigsen, Isabella Schwartz
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with injury in professional ballet and modern dancers, and assess if dancers are reporting their injuries and explore reasons for not reporting injuries. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Participants were recruited from nine professional ballet and modern dance companies in Canada, Denmark, Israel, and Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Professional ballet and modern dancers...
February 17, 2016: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
Marie-Lyne Nault, Mininder S Kocher, Lyle J Micheli
Os trigonum syndrome is the result of an overuse injury of the posterior ankle caused by repetitive plantar flexion stress. It is predominantly seen in ballet dancers and soccer players and is primarily a clinical diagnosis of exacerbated posterior ankle pain while dancing on pointe or demi-pointe or while doing push-off maneuvers. Symptoms may improve with rest or activity modification. Imaging studies, including a lateral radiographic view of the ankle in maximal plantar flexion, will typically reveal the os trigonum between the posterior tibial lip and calcaneus...
September 2014: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Chantal Simons, Elizabeth J Bradshaw
Overuse injuries, resulting from repetitive subacute impact loading, are a problem in high-performance sports. Monitoring of impact loading may aid in the prevention of these injuries. The current study aimed to establish the intra-day and inter-day reliability of a tri-axial accelerometer to assess impact loading during jumping and landing tasks. Twelve participants wore an accelerometer on their upper and lower back. They performed a continuous hopping task as well as drop landings and rebound jumps from three drop heights (37...
2016: Sports Biomechanics
Jeppe Bo Lauersen, Ditte Marie Bertelsen, Lars Bo Andersen
BACKGROUND: Physical activity is important in both prevention and treatment of many common diseases, but sports injuries can pose serious problems. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether physical activity exercises can reduce sports injuries and perform stratified analyses of strength training, stretching, proprioception and combinations of these, and provide separate acute and overuse injury estimates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and SPORTDiscus were searched and yielded 3462 results...
June 2014: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Anna E Saw, Luana C Main, Paul B Gastin
BACKGROUND: Monitoring athlete well-being is essential to guide training and to detect any progression towards negative health outcomes and associated poor performance. Objective (performance, physiological, biochemical) and subjective measures are all options for athlete monitoring. OBJECTIVE: We systematically reviewed objective and subjective measures of athlete well-being. Objective measures, including those taken at rest (eg, blood markers, heart rate) and during exercise (eg, oxygen consumption, heart rate response), were compared against subjective measures (eg, mood, perceived stress)...
March 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Sarah J Kenny, Jackie L Whittaker, Carolyn A Emery
BACKGROUND: Preprofessional dancers partake in rigorous training and have high injury prevalence. Attempts to identify risk factors for dance injuries have focused on a diversity of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. OBJECTIVE: To identify and evaluate the evidence examining risk factors for musculoskeletal injury in preprofessional ballet and modern dancers. METHODS: Fifteen electronic databases were systematically searched to October 2015...
August 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Peter Blanch, Tim J Gabbett
The return to sport from injury is a difficult multifactorial decision, and risk of reinjury is an important component. Most protocols for ascertaining the return to play status involve assessment of the healing status of the original injury and functional tests which have little proven predictive ability. Little attention has been paid to ascertaining whether an athlete has completed sufficient training to be prepared for competition. Recently, we have completed a series of studies in cricket, rugby league and Australian rules football that have shown that when an athlete's training and playing load for a given week (acute load) spikes above what they have been doing on average over the past 4 weeks (chronic load), they are more likely to be injured...
April 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Eric J Hegedus, Suzanne McDonough, Chris Bleakley, G David Baxter, J Tyler DePew, Ian Bradbury, Chad Cook
BACKGROUND: The ability to predict injury is difficult. Prior injury is the only risk factor that has been reported consistently in multiple research studies. Convenient and easy to perform, physical performance tests (PPTs) have great allure as prognostic factors. METHODS: 11 PPTs were issued to 359 participants over the course of three seasons of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic competition. Injuries were monitored and reported in a centralised university tracking system...
January 8, 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Tina Junge, Lisbeth Runge, Birgit Juul-Kristensen, Niels Wedderkopp
INTRODUCTION: Knee injuries are frequent in children, with most studies reporting traumatic knee injuries. Evidence of risk factors for knee injuries in children is sparse. The purpose of this study was to report the extent of traumatic and overuse knee injuries in children and to evaluate intrinsic and extrinsic factors for risk of these injuries. METHODS: Weekly musculoskeletal pain, sport participation, and sports type were reported by 1326 school children (8-15 yr)...
April 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
2016-01-14 10:50:31
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"