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71 papers 25 to 100 followers
Pablo Blanco, Giovanni Volpicelli
BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) is a widely used tool in emergency and critical care settings, useful in the decision-making process as well as in interventional guidance. While having an impressive diagnostic accuracy in the hands of highly skilled operators, inexperienced practitioners must be aware of some common misinterpretations that may lead to wrong decisions at the bedside. OBJECTIVES: This article provides a revision list of common POCUS misdiagnoses usually found in practice and offers useful tips to recognize and avoid them...
December 2016: Critical Ultrasound Journal
Aditya Lyall, Supradip Ghosh, Kirtee Mishra
Training in echocardiography is essential for an intensivist. We present a rapidly fatal case of obstructive shock where a vigilant intensivist could diagnose left atrial mass obstructing the mitral inflow as the etiology of shock.
September 2016: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Zhihua Lu, Qiuping Xu, Yuehua Yuan, Ge Zhang, Feng Guo, Huiqing Ge
BACKGROUND: Diaphragmatic dysfunction is often underdiagnosed and is among the risk factors for failed weaning. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of diaphragmatic dysfunction diagnosed by B-mode ultrasonography and to determine whether prolonged weaning subjects with diaphragmatic dysfunction have increased duration of mechanical ventilation compared with those without diaphragmatic dysfunction. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study in mechanically ventilated subjects who failed ≥3 spontaneous breathing trials or required >7 d of weaning after the first spontaneous breathing trial...
October 2016: Respiratory Care
Massimo Zambon, Massimiliano Greco, Speranza Bocchino, Luca Cabrini, Paolo Federico Beccaria, Alberto Zangrillo
PURPOSE: Diaphragmatic dysfunction (DD) has a high incidence in critically ill patients and is an under-recognized cause of respiratory failure and prolonged weaning from mechanical ventilation. Among different methods to assess diaphragmatic function, diaphragm ultrasonography (DU) is noninvasive, rapid, and easy to perform at the bedside. We systematically reviewed the current literature assessing the usefulness and accuracy of DU in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. METHODS: Pubmed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar Databases were searched for pertinent studies...
September 12, 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
Yonatan Y Greenstein, Ross Littauer, Mangala Narasimhan, Paul H Mayo, Seth J Koenig
BACKGROUND: Widespread use of critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) for the management of patients in the intensive care unit requires an effective training program. The effectiveness of national and regional CCUS training courses is not known. This study describes a national level, simulation-based, three day CCUS training program and evaluates its effectiveness. METHODS: Five consecutive CCUS courses, with a total of 363 people, were studied. The three day CCUS training program consisted of didactic lectures, ultrasonography interpretation sessions, and hands-on modules with live models...
September 16, 2016: Chest
Mark Hew, Tunn Ren Tay
For many respiratory physicians, point-of-care chest ultrasound is now an integral part of clinical practice. The diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound to detect abnormalities of the pleura, the lung parenchyma and the thoracic musculoskeletal system is well described. However, the efficacy of a test extends beyond just diagnostic accuracy. The true value of a test depends on the degree to which diagnostic accuracy efficacy influences decision-making efficacy, and the subsequent extent to which this impacts health outcome efficacy...
September 2016: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
Mangala Narasimhan, Seth J Koenig, Paul H Mayo
Ultrasonography is an essential imaging modality in the ICU used to diagnose and guide the treatment of cardiopulmonary failure. Critical care ultrasonography requires that all image acquisition, image interpretation, and clinical applications of ultrasonography are personally performed by the critical care clinician at the point of care and that the information obtained is combined with the history, physical, and laboratory information. Point-of-care ultrasonography is often compartmentalized such that the clinician will focus on one body system while performing the critical care ultrasonography examination...
October 2016: Chest
Anthony S McLean
Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available...
August 20, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Micah R Whitson, Paul H Mayo
Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) is a useful imaging technique for the emergency medicine (EM) physician. Because of its growing use in EM, this article will summarize the historical development, the scope of practice, and some evidence supporting the current applications of POCUS in the adult emergency department. Bedside ultrasonography in the emergency department shares clinical applications with critical care ultrasonography, including goal-directed echocardiography, echocardiography during cardiac arrest, thoracic ultrasonography, evaluation for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, screening abdominal ultrasonography, ultrasonography in trauma, and guidance of procedures with ultrasonography...
August 15, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Philippe Vignon, Xavier Repessé, Antoine Vieillard-Baron, Eric Maury
Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome...
August 15, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Francesca Cortellaro, Elisa Ceriani, Monica Spinelli, Carlo Campanella, Ilaria Bossi, Daniele Coen, Giovanni Casazza, Chiara Cogliati
Several studies address the accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) in the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) evaluating the interstitial syndrome, which is characterized by multiple and diffuse vertical artifacts (B-lines), and correlates with extravascular lung water. We studied the potential role of LUS in monitoring CPE response to therapy, by evaluating the clearance of interstitial syndrome within the first 24 h after Emergency Department (ED) admission. LUS was performed at arrival (T0), after 3 (T3) and 24 (T24) hours...
July 29, 2016: Internal and Emergency Medicine
Justin K Lui, Gisela I Banauch
Bedside goal-directed ultrasound is a powerful tool for rapid differential diagnosis and monitoring of cardiopulmonary disease in the critically ill patient population. The bedside intensivist is in a unique position to integrate ultrasound findings with the overall clinical situation. Medically critically ill patients who require urgent bedside diagnostic assessment fall into 2 categories: (1) acute respiratory failure and (2) hemodynamic derangements. The first portion of this review outlines the diagnostic role of bedside ultrasound in the medically critically ill patient population for the diagnosis and treatment of acute respiratory failure, acute respiratory distress, and severe hypoxemia...
July 8, 2016: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
Astha Chichra, Mina Makaryus, Parag Chaudhri, Mangala Narasimhan
Bedside ultrasonographic assessment of the lung and pleura provides rapid, noninvasive, and essential information in diagnosis and management of various pulmonary conditions. Ultrasonography helps in diagnosing common conditions, including consolidation, interstitial syndrome, pleural effusions and masses, pneumothorax, and diaphragmatic dysfunction. It provides procedural guidance for various pulmonary procedures, including thoracentesis, chest tube insertion, transthoracic aspiration, and biopsies. This article describes major applications of ultrasonography for the pulmonary consultant along with illustrative figures and videos...
2016: Clinical Medicine Insights. Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine
Christoph F Dietrich, Gebhard Mathis, Michael Blaivas, Giovanni Volpicelli, Armin Seibel, Daniel Wastl, Nathan S S Atkinson, Xin-Wu Cui, Mei Fan, Dong Yi
BACKGROUND: The analysis of lung artefacts has gained increasing importance as markers of lung pathology. B-line artefact (BLA), caused by a reverberation phenomenon, is the most important lung artefact. In this review, we discuss the current role of BLA in pneumology and explore open questions of the published consensus. METHODS: We summarized current literature about BLA. Also, we presented observations on healthy subjects and patients with interstitial syndrome (pulmonary fibrosis and edema), to investigate technical factors influencing BLA visualization...
June 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
Francesca Cortellaro, Laura Ferrari, Francesco Molteni, Paolo Aseni, Marta Velati, Linda Guarnieri, Katia Barbara Cazzola, Silvia Colombo, Daniele Coen
Sepsis is a rapidly evolving disease with a high mortality rate. The early identification of sepsis and the implementation of early evidence-based therapies have been recognized to improve outcome and decrease sepsis-related mortality. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the standard diagnostic work-up of septic patients with an integrated approach using early point of care ultrasound (POCUS) to identify the source of infection and to speed up the time to diagnosis. We enrolled a consecutive sample of adult patients admitted to the ED who met the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) criteria for sepsis...
May 28, 2016: Internal and Emergency Medicine
Sachita P Shah, Sachin P Shah, Reginald Fils-Aime, Walkens Desir, Joanel Joasil, David M Venesy, Krithika Meera Muruganandan
BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and management of acutely dyspneic patients in resource-limited developing world settings poses a particular challenge. Focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound (CPUS) may assist in the emergency diagnosis and management of patients with acute dyspnea by identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction, pericardial effusion, interstitial pulmonary edema, and pleural effusion. We sought to assess the accuracy of emergency providers performing CPUS after a training intervention in a limited-resource setting; a secondary objective was to assess the ability of CPUS to affect change of clinician diagnostic assessment and acute management in patients presenting with undifferentiated dyspnea...
December 2016: Critical Ultrasound Journal
Laurent Guérin, Antoine Vieillard-Baron
Echocardiography is a noninvasive and accurate tool used in the intensive care unit to assess cardiac function and monitor hemodynamics in shocked patients. During severe sepsis or septic shock, several mechanisms can lead to hemodynamic failure and have to be quickly and precisely diagnosed to propose adequate, personalized, and timely hemodynamic therapy. Echocardiography truly provides intensivists with this diagnostic possibility, whether or not there is fluid responsiveness, cardiac dysfunction, or persistent vasoplegia...
June 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
K Haji, A Royse, C Green, J Botha, D Canty, C Royse
The diaphragm is the most important muscle of respiration. At equilibrium, the load imposed on the diaphragmatic muscles from transdiaphragmatic pressure balances the force generated by diaphragmatic muscles. However, procedural and nonprocedural thoracic and abdominal conditions may disrupt this equilibrium and impair diaphragmatic function. Diaphragmatic dysfunction is associated with respiratory insufficiency and poor outcome. Therefore, rapid diagnosis and early intervention may be useful. Ultrasound imaging provides quick and accurate bedside assessment of the diaphragm...
August 2016: Journal of Critical Care
Giuseppe Francesco Sferrazza Papa, Giulia Michela Pellegrino, Fabiano Di Marco, Gianluca Imeri, Laurent Brochard, Ewan Goligher, Stefano Centanni
Ultrasonography is the only non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging technique widely available to directly assess diaphragmatic function. Two different sonographic approaches permit the assessment of muscle thickening in the zone of apposition and excursion of the dome of the diaphragm. Thanks to the new hand-held ultrasound instruments, the morphology and function of the diaphragm can be assessed in different settings, such as outpatient clinic, pulmonary function test laboratory, hospital department and intensive care unit, and under different conditions...
2016: Respiration; International Review of Thoracic Diseases
Alexander Levitov, Heidi L Frankel, Michael Blaivas, Andrew W Kirkpatrick, Erik Su, David Evans, Douglas T Summerfield, Anthony Slonim, Raoul Breitkreutz, Susanna Price, Matthew McLaughlin, Paul E Marik, Mahmoud Elbarbary
OBJECTIVE: To establish evidence-based guidelines for the use of bedside cardiac ultrasound, echocardiography, in the ICU and equivalent care sites. METHODS: Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system was used to rank the "levels" of quality of evidence into high (A), moderate (B), or low (C) and to determine the "strength" of recommendations as either strong (strength class 1) or conditional/weak (strength class 2), thus generating six "grades" of recommendations (1A-1B-1C-2A-2B-2C)...
June 2016: Critical Care Medicine
2016-05-19 21:12:45
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