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Critical Care Review articles

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149 papers 500 to 1000 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28448952/sepsis-and-septic-shock-pathogenesis-and-treatment-perspectives
#1
REVIEW
Hayk Minasyan
The majority of bacteremias do not develop to sepsis: bacteria are cleared from the bloodstream. Oxygen released from erythrocytes and humoral immunity kill bacteria in the bloodstream. Sepsis develops if bacteria are resistant to oxidation and proliferate in erythrocytes. Bacteria provoke oxygen release from erythrocytes to arterial blood. Abundant release of oxygen to the plasma triggers a cascade of events that cause: 1. oxygen delivery failure to cells; 2. oxidation of plasma components that impairs humoral regulation and inactivates immune complexes; 3...
August 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207600/advancements-in-the-critical-care-management-of-status-epilepticus
#2
Andrew Bauerschmidt, Andrew Martin, Jan Claassen
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Status epilepticus has a high morbidity and mortality. There are little definitive data to guide management; however, new recent data continue to improve understanding of management options of status epilepticus. This review examines recent advancements regarding the critical care management of status epilepticus. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies support the initial treatment of status epilepticus with early and aggressive benzodiazepine dosing...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157821/blood-pressure-control-for-acute-severe-ischemic-and-hemorrhagic-stroke
#3
Julian Bösel
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Severe ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke is a devastating cerebrovascular disease often demanding critical care. Optimal management of blood pressure (BP) in the acute phase is controversial. The purpose of this review is to display insights from recent studies on BP control in both conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: BP control in acute ischemic stroke has recently been investigated with regard to endovascular recanalizing therapies. Decreases from baseline BP and hypotension during the intervention have been found detrimental...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27858374/prediction-of-fluid-responsiveness-an-update
#4
REVIEW
Xavier Monnet, Paul E Marik, Jean-Louis Teboul
In patients with acute circulatory failure, the decision to give fluids or not should not be taken lightly. The risk of overzealous fluid administration has been clearly established. Moreover, volume expansion does not always increase cardiac output as one expects. Thus, after the very initial phase and/or if fluid losses are not obvious, predicting fluid responsiveness should be the first step of fluid strategy. For this purpose, the central venous pressure as well as other "static" markers of preload has been used for decades, but they are not reliable...
December 2016: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898438/rescue-therapies-for-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-what-to-try-first
#5
Onnen Moerer, Tommaso Tonetti, Michael Quintel
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Severe respiratory failure due to the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) might require rescue therapy measures beyond even extended standard care to ensure adequate oxygenation and survival. This review provides a summary and assessment of treatment options that can be beneficial when the standard approach fails. RECENT FINDINGS: 'Life-threatening' conditions or refractory hypoxemia during mechanical ventilation are more a matter of personal rating than an objective diagnosis based on defined and/or unanimously agreed thresholds that would mandate the use of rescue therapies...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898439/limiting-sedation-for-patients-with-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-time-to-wake-up
#6
Faraaz Ali Shah, Timothy D Girard, Sachin Yende
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may require sedation in their clinical care. The goals of sedation in ARDS patients are to improve patient comfort and tolerance of supportive and therapeutic measures without contributing to adverse outcomes. This review discusses the current evidence for sedation management in patients with ARDS. RECENT FINDINGS: Deep sedation strategies should be avoided in the care of patients with ARDS because deep sedation has been associated with increased time on mechanical ventilation, longer ICU and hospital length of stay, and higher mortality in critically ill patients...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25692805/diarrhoea-in-the-critically-ill
#7
REVIEW
Annika Reintam Blaser, Adam M Deane, Sonja Fruhwald
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize existing evidence on definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors, consequences, outcome and management of diarrhoea in the critically ill. RECENT FINDINGS: In health, diarrhoea is defined as the passage of three or more loose or liquid stools per day. In the critically ill, the diagnosis is yet to be formalized and reported prevalence of diarrhoea varies according to the definition used. Recent studies estimate the prevalence between 14 and 21% and describe risk factors for diarrhoea in critically ill patients...
April 2015: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27661757/sepsis-induced-acute-kidney-injury
#8
Hernando Gómez, John A Kellum
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sepsis is a common and frequently fatal condition in which mortality has been consistently linked to increasing organ dysfunction. For example, acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 40-50% of septic patients and increases mortality six to eight-fold. However, the mechanisms by which sepsis causes organ dysfunction are not well understood and hence current therapy remains reactive and nonspecific. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have challenged the previous notion that organ dysfunction is solely secondary to hypoperfusion, by showing, for example, that AKI occurs in the setting of normal or increased renal blood flow; and that it is characterized not by acute tubular necrosis or apoptosis, but rather by heterogeneous areas of colocalized sluggish peritubular blood flow and tubular epithelial cell oxidative stress...
December 2016: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27670788/acute-kidney-injury-2016-diagnosis-and-diagnostic-workup
#9
REVIEW
Marlies Ostermann, Michael Joannidis
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with serious short- and long-term complications. Early diagnosis and identification of the underlying aetiology are essential to guide management. In this review, we outline the current definition of AKI and the potential pitfalls, and summarise the existing and future tools to investigate AKI in critically ill patients.
September 27, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27640182/the-critical-care-management-of-spontaneous-intracranial-hemorrhage-a-contemporary-review
#10
REVIEW
Airton Leonardo de Oliveira Manoel, Alberto Goffi, Fernando Godinho Zampieri, David Turkel-Parrella, Abhijit Duggal, Thomas R Marotta, R Loch Macdonald, Simon Abrahamson
Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), defined as nontraumatic bleeding into the brain parenchyma, is the second most common subtype of stroke, with 5.3 million cases and over 3 million deaths reported worldwide in 2010. Case fatality is extremely high (reaching approximately 60 % at 1 year post event). Only 20 % of patients who survive are independent within 6 months. Factors such as chronic hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and anticoagulation are commonly associated with ICH. Chronic arterial hypertension represents the major risk factor for bleeding...
September 18, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26118922/delirium-in-critically-ill-patients
#11
REVIEW
Peter Jackson, Akram Khan
Delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) is a common diagnosis, with an incidence ranging between 45% and 87%. Delirium represents a significant burden both to the patient and to the health care system, with a 3.2-fold increase in 6-month mortality and annual US health care costs up to $16 billion. In this review, the diagnosis, epidemiology, and risk factors for delirium in the ICU are discussed. The pathophysiology of delirium and evolving prevention and treatment modalities are outlined.
July 2015: Critical Care Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27016163/abdominal-compartment-hypertension-and-abdominal-compartment-syndrome
#12
REVIEW
Patrick Maluso, Jody Olson, Babak Sarani
Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare but potentially morbid diagnoses. Clinical index of suspicion for these disorders should be raised following massive resuscitation, abdominal wall reconstruction/injury, and in those with space-occupying disorders in the abdomen. Gold standard for diagnosis involves measurement of bladder pressure, with a pressure greater than 12 mm Hg being consistent with IAH and greater than 25 mm Hg being consistent with ACS. Decompressive laparotomy is definitive therapy but paracentesis can be equally therapeutic in properly selected patients...
April 2016: Critical Care Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27016168/severe-acute-pancreatitis-and-necrotizing-pancreatitis
#13
REVIEW
Rahul Maheshwari, Ram M Subramanian
Acute pancreatitis results in nearly 250,000 admissions annually. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Pancreatic necrosis accounts for substantial additional morbidity, with mortality rates remaining as high as 10% to 20% despite advances in critical care. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, multiorgan failure, need for pancreatic debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach involving both medical and surgical critical care...
April 2016: Critical Care Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27600123/colloids-in-acute-burn-resuscitation
#14
REVIEW
Robert Cartotto, David Greenhalgh
Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27600129/complicated-burn-resuscitation
#15
REVIEW
David T Harrington
More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27600130/fluid-creep-and-over-resuscitation
#16
REVIEW
Jeffrey R Saffle
Fluid creep is the term applied to a burn resuscitation, which requires more fluid than predicted by standard formulas. Fluid creep is common today and is linked to several serious edema-related complications. Increased fluid requirements may accompany the appropriate resuscitation of massive injuries but dangerous fluid creep is also caused by overly permissive fluid infusion and the lack of colloid supplementation. Several strategies for recognizing and treating fluid creep are presented.
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27536694/fluid-management-for-critically-ill-patients-a-review-of-the-current-state-of-fluid-therapy-in-the-intensive-care-unit
#17
REVIEW
Erin Frazee, Kianoush Kashani
BACKGROUND: Intravenous fluids (IVF) are frequently utilized to restore intravascular volume in patients with distributive and hypovolemic shock. Although the benefits of the appropriate use of fluids in intensive care units (ICUs) and hospitals are well described, there is growing knowledge regarding the potential risks of volume overload and its impact on organ failure and mortality. To avoid volume overload and its associated complications, strategies to identify fluid responsiveness are developed and utilized more often among ICU patients...
June 2016: Kidney Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27524204/critical-care-ultrasonography-in-acute-respiratory-failure
#18
REVIEW
Philippe Vignon, Xavier Repessé, Antoine Vieillard-Baron, Eric Maury
Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome...
August 15, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27543137/echocardiography-in-shock-management
#19
REVIEW
Anthony S McLean
Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available...
August 20, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27521441/executive-summary-management-of-adults-with-hospital-acquired-and-ventilator-associated-pneumonia-2016-clinical-practice-guidelines-by-the-infectious-diseases-society-of-america-and-the-american-thoracic-society
#20
Andre C Kalil, Mark L Metersky, Michael Klompas, John Muscedere, Daniel A Sweeney, Lucy B Palmer, Lena M Napolitano, Naomi P O'Grady, John G Bartlett, Jordi Carratalà, Ali A El Solh, Santiago Ewig, Paul D Fey, Thomas M File, Marcos I Restrepo, Jason A Roberts, Grant W Waterer, Peggy Cruse, Shandra L Knight, Jan L Brozek
It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia...
September 1, 2016: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
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