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EM Critical care

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96 papers 100 to 500 followers
By Terren Trott terren.trott@gmail.com
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29641969/diagnostic-use-of-base-excess-in-acid-base-disorders
#1
REVIEW
Kenrick Berend
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 378, Issue 15, Page 1419-1428, April 2018.
April 12, 2018: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650544/evaluation-and-management-of-right-sided-heart-failure-a-scientific-statement-from-the-american-heart-association
#2
REVIEW
Marvin A Konstam, Michael S Kiernan, Daniel Bernstein, Biykem Bozkurt, Miriam Jacob, Navin K Kapur, Robb D Kociol, Eldrin F Lewis, Mandeep R Mehra, Francis D Pagani, Amish N Raval, Carey Ward
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The diverse causes of right-sided heart failure (RHF) include, among others, primary cardiomyopathies with right ventricular (RV) involvement, RV ischemia and infarction, volume loading caused by cardiac lesions associated with congenital heart disease and valvular pathologies, and pressure loading resulting from pulmonic stenosis or pulmonary hypertension from a variety of causes, including left-sided heart disease. Progressive RV dysfunction in these disease states is associated with increased morbidity and mortality...
May 15, 2018: Circulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29634494/assessment-of-fluid-responsiveness-recent-advances
#3
Xavier Monnet, Jean-Louis Teboul
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In the field of prediction of fluid responsiveness, the most recent studies have focused on validating new tests, on clarifying the limitations of older ones, and better defining their modalities. RECENT FINDINGS: The limitations of pulse pressure/stroke volume variations are numerous, but recent efforts have been made to overcome these limitations, like in case of low tidal volume ventilation. Following pulse pressure/stroke volume variations, new tests have emerged which assess preload responsiveness by challenging cardiac preload through heart-lung interactions, like during recruitment manoeuvres and end-expiratory/inspiratory occlusions...
June 2018: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29471884/should-we-measure-the-central-venous-pressure-to-guide-fluid-management-ten-answers-to-10-questions
#4
Daniel De Backer, Jean-Louis Vincent
The central venous pressure (CVP) is the most frequently used variable to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients, although its use has been challenged. In this viewpoint, we use a question and answer format to highlight the potential advantages and limitations of using CVP measurements to guide fluid resuscitation.
February 23, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29534919/the-association-of-emergency-department-administration-of-sodium-bicarbonate-after-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-with-outcomes
#5
Yi-Chuan Chen, Ming-Szu Hung, Chia-Yen Liu, Cheng-Ting Hsiao, Yao-Hsu Yang
BACKGROUND: Sodium bicarbonate administration is mostly restricted to in-hospital use in Taiwan. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of sodium bicarbonate on outcomes among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: This population-based study used a 16-year database to analyze the association between sodium bicarbonate administration for resuscitation in the emergency department (ED) and outcomes. All adult patients with OHCA were identified through diagnostic and procedure codes...
March 5, 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29461885/physiologic-basis-of-mechanical-ventilation
#6
Martin J Tobin
The primary purpose of mechanical ventilation is to decrease work of breathing. Achieving this goal requires that cycling of the ventilator be carefully aligned with the intrinsic rhythm of a patient's respiratory center output. Problems arise at the point of ventilator triggering, post-trigger inflation, and inspiration-expiration switchover. Careful, iterative adjustments of ventilator settings are required to minimize work of breathing. Use of protocols for the selection of ventilator settings can lead to complications (including alveolar overdistention) and risk of death...
February 2018: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28302179/balanced-crystalloids-versus-saline-in-the-intensive-care-unit-study-protocol-for-a-cluster-randomized-multiple-crossover-trial
#7
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Matthew W Semler, Wesley H Self, Li Wang, Daniel W Byrne, Jonathan P Wanderer, Jesse M Ehrenfeld, Joanna L Stollings, Avinash B Kumar, Antonio Hernandez, Oscar D Guillamondegui, Addison K May, Edward D Siew, Andrew D Shaw, Gordon R Bernard, Todd W Rice
BACKGROUND: Saline, the intravenous fluid most commonly administered to critically ill adults, contains a high chloride content, which may be associated with acute kidney injury and death. Whether using balanced crystalloids rather than saline decreases the risk of acute kidney injury and death among critically ill adults remains unknown. METHODS: The Isotonic Solutions and Major Adverse Renal Events Trial (SMART) is a pragmatic, cluster-level allocation, cluster-level crossover trial being conducted between 1 June 2015 and 30 April 2017 in five intensive care units at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN, USA...
March 16, 2017: Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28407811/saline-versus-balanced-crystalloids-for-intravenous-fluid-therapy-in-the-emergency-department-study-protocol-for-a-cluster-randomized-multiple-crossover-trial
#8
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Wesley H Self, Matthew W Semler, Jonathan P Wanderer, Jesse M Ehrenfeld, Daniel W Byrne, Li Wang, Leanne Atchison, Matthew Felbinger, Ian D Jones, Stephan Russ, Andrew D Shaw, Gordon R Bernard, Todd W Rice
BACKGROUND: Prior studies in critically ill patients suggest the supra-physiologic chloride concentration of 0.9% ("normal") saline may be associated with higher risk of renal failure and death compared to physiologically balanced crystalloids. However, the comparative effects of 0.9% saline and balanced fluids are largely unexamined among patients outside the intensive care unit, who represent the vast majority of patients treated with intravenous fluids. METHODS/DESIGN: This study, entitled Saline Against Lactated Ringer's or Plasma-Lyte in the Emergency Department (SALT-ED), is a pragmatic, cluster, multiple-crossover trial at a single institution evaluating clinical outcomes of adults treated with 0...
April 13, 2017: Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29347874/adjunctive-glucocorticoid-therapy-in-patients-with-septic-shock
#9
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Balasubramanian Venkatesh, Simon Finfer, Jeremy Cohen, Dorrilyn Rajbhandari, Yaseen Arabi, Rinaldo Bellomo, Laurent Billot, Maryam Correa, Parisa Glass, Meg Harward, Christopher Joyce, Qiang Li, Colin McArthur, Anders Perner, Andrew Rhodes, Kelly Thompson, Steve Webb, John Myburgh
BACKGROUND: Whether hydrocortisone reduces mortality among patients with septic shock is unclear. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients with septic shock who were undergoing mechanical ventilation to receive hydrocortisone (at a dose of 200 mg per day) or placebo for 7 days or until death or discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU), whichever came first. The primary outcome was death from any cause at 90 days. RESULTS: From March 2013 through April 2017, a total of 3800 patients underwent randomization...
March 1, 2018: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29217394/the-use-of-end-tidal-carbon-dioxide-etco-2-measurement-to-guide-management-of-cardiac-arrest-a-systematic-review
#10
REVIEW
Edison F Paiva, James H Paxton, Brian J O'Neil
AIMS: To identify whether any level of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2 ) measured during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) correlates with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or survival in adults experiencing cardiac arrest in any setting. METHODS: Systematic review. We included randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies of adult cardiac arrest in any setting that reported specific (rather than pooled) ETCO2 values and attempted to correlate those values with prognosis...
February 2018: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21606393/relationship-between-supranormal-oxygen-tension-and-outcome-after-resuscitation-from-cardiac-arrest
#11
J Hope Kilgannon, Alan E Jones, Joseph E Parrillo, R Phillip Dellinger, Barry Milcarek, Krystal Hunter, Nathan I Shapiro, Stephen Trzeciak
BACKGROUND: Laboratory and recent clinical data suggest that hyperoxemia after resuscitation from cardiac arrest is harmful; however, it remains unclear if the risk of adverse outcome is a threshold effect at a specific supranormal oxygen tension, or is a dose-dependent association. We aimed to define the relationship between supranormal oxygen tension and outcome in postresuscitation patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a multicenter cohort study using the Project IMPACT database (intensive care units at 120 US hospitals)...
June 14, 2011: Circulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29175085/ventilator-management-and-respiratory-care-after-cardiac-arrest-oxygenation-ventilation-infection-and-injury
#12
REVIEW
Nicholas J Johnson, David J Carlbom, David F Gaieski
Return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest results in a systemic inflammatory state called the post-cardiac arrest syndrome, which is characterized by oxidative stress, coagulopathy, neuronal injury, and organ dysfunction. Perturbations in oxygenation and ventilation may exacerbate secondary injury after cardiac arrest and have been shown to be associated with poor outcome. Further, patients who experience cardiac arrest are at risk for a number of other pulmonary complications. Up to 70% of patients experience early infection after cardiac arrest, and the respiratory tract is the most common source...
November 22, 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27784613/ventricular-fibrillation-waveform-measures-and-the-etiology-of-cardiac-arrest
#13
Danelle Hidano, Jason Coult, Jennifer Blackwood, Carol Fahrenbruch, Heemun Kwok, Peter Kudenchuk, Thomas Rea
BACKGROUND: Early determination of the acute etiology of cardiac arrest could help guide resuscitation or post-resuscitation care. In experimental studies, quantitative measures of the ventricular fibrillation waveform distinguish ischemic from non-ischemic etiology. METHODS: We investigated whether waveform measures distinguished arrest etiology among adults treated by EMS for out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation between January 1, 2006-December 31, 2014. Etiology was classified using hospital information into three exclusive groups: acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), ACS without ST elevation (non-STEMI), or non-ischemic arrest...
December 2016: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28111195/endotracheal-tube-placement-confirmation-100-sensitivity-and-specificity-with-sustained-four-phase-capnographic-waveforms-in-a-cadaveric-experimental-model
#14
Salvatore Silvestri, Jay G Ladde, James F Brown, Jesus V Roa, Christopher Hunter, George A Ralls, Linda Papa
BACKGROUND: Waveform capnography is considered the gold standard for verification of proper endotracheal tube placement, but current guidelines caution that it is unreliable in low-perfusion states such as cardiac arrest. Recent case reports found that long-deceased cadavers can produce capnographic waveforms. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive value of waveform capnography for endotracheal tube placement verification and detection of misplacement using a cadaveric experimental model...
June 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916478/a-retrospective-study-of-pulseless-electrical-activity-bedside-ultrasound-identifies-interventions-during-resuscitation-associated-with-improved-survival-to-hospital-admission-a-reason-study
#15
Romolo Gaspari, Anthony Weekes, Srikar Adhikari, Vicki Noble, Jason T Nomura, Daniel Theodoro, Michael Woo, Paul Atkinson, David Blehar, Samuel Brown, Terrell Caffery, Emily Douglass, Jacqueline Fraser, Christine Haines, Samuel Lam, Michael Lanspa, Margaret Lewis, Otto Liebmann, Alexander Limkakeng, Fernando Lopez, Elke Platz, Michelle Mendoza, Hal Minnigan, Christopher Moore, Joseph Novik, Louise Rang, Will Scruggs, Christopher Raio
OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine whether organized or disorganized cardiac activity is associated with increased survival in patients who present in pulseless electrical activity (PEA) treated with either 1) standard advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) medications or 2) other interventions. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a prospective, multi-center observational study utilizing ultrasound in out-of-hospital or inemergency department PEA arrest...
November 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923988/contemporary-management-of-cardiogenic-shock-a-scientific-statement-from-the-american-heart-association
#16
REVIEW
Sean van Diepen, Jason N Katz, Nancy M Albert, Timothy D Henry, Alice K Jacobs, Navin K Kapur, Ahmet Kilic, Venu Menon, E Magnus Ohman, Nancy K Sweitzer, Holger Thiele, Jeffrey B Washam, Mauricio G Cohen
Cardiogenic shock is a high-acuity, potentially complex, and hemodynamically diverse state of end-organ hypoperfusion that is frequently associated with multisystem organ failure. Despite improving survival in recent years, patient morbidity and mortality remain high, and there are few evidence-based therapeutic interventions known to clearly improve patient outcomes. This scientific statement on cardiogenic shock summarizes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, causes, and outcomes of cardiogenic shock; reviews contemporary best medical, surgical, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care practices; advocates for the development of regionalized systems of care; and outlines future research priorities...
October 17, 2017: Circulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701178/the-future-of-mechanical-ventilation-lessons-from-the-present-and-the-past
#17
REVIEW
Luciano Gattinoni, John J Marini, Francesca Collino, Giorgia Maiolo, Francesca Rapetti, Tommaso Tonetti, Francesco Vasques, Michael Quintel
The adverse effects of mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) arise from two main causes: unphysiological increases of transpulmonary pressure and unphysiological increases/decreases of pleural pressure during positive or negative pressure ventilation. The transpulmonary pressure-related side effects primarily account for ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) while the pleural pressure-related side effects primarily account for hemodynamic alterations. The changes of transpulmonary pressure and pleural pressure resulting from a given applied driving pressure depend on the relative elastances of the lung and chest wall...
July 12, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792873/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#18
REVIEW
B Taylor Thompson, Rachel C Chambers, Kathleen D Liu
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 377, Issue 6, Page 562-572, August 2017.
August 10, 2017: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28754527/ultrasound-use-during-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-is-associated-with-delays-in-chest-compressions
#19
Maite A Huis In 't Veld, Michael G Allison, David S Bostick, Kiondra R Fisher, Olga G Goloubeva, Michael D Witting, Michael E Winters
AIM: High-quality chest compressions are a critical component of the resuscitation of patients in cardiopulmonary arrest. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is used frequently during emergency department (ED) resuscitations, but there has been limited research assessing its benefits and harms during the delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We hypothesized that use of POCUS during cardiac arrest resuscitation adversely affects high-quality CPR by lengthening the duration of pulse checks beyond the current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines recommendation of 10s...
October 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811122/acute-kidney-injury-after-computed-tomography-a-meta-analysis
#20
REVIEW
Ryan D Aycock, Lauren M Westafer, Jennifer L Boxen, Nima Majlesi, Elizabeth M Schoenfeld, Raveendhara R Bannuru
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Computed tomography (CT) is an important imaging modality used in the diagnosis of a variety of disorders. Imaging quality may be improved if intravenous contrast is added, but there is a concern for potential renal injury. Our goal is to perform a meta-analysis to compare the risk of acute kidney injury, need for renal replacement, and total mortality after contrast-enhanced CT versus noncontrast CT. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE (PubMed), the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, ProQuest, and Academic Search Premier for relevant articles...
January 2018: Annals of Emergency Medicine
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