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EM Critical care

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By Terren Trott terren.trott@gmail.com
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701178/the-future-of-mechanical-ventilation-lessons-from-the-present-and-the-past
#1
REVIEW
Luciano Gattinoni, John J Marini, Francesca Collino, Giorgia Maiolo, Francesca Rapetti, Tommaso Tonetti, Francesco Vasques, Michael Quintel
The adverse effects of mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) arise from two main causes: unphysiological increases of transpulmonary pressure and unphysiological increases/decreases of pleural pressure during positive or negative pressure ventilation. The transpulmonary pressure-related side effects primarily account for ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) while the pleural pressure-related side effects primarily account for hemodynamic alterations. The changes of transpulmonary pressure and pleural pressure resulting from a given applied driving pressure depend on the relative elastances of the lung and chest wall...
July 12, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792873/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#2
REVIEW
B Taylor Thompson, Rachel C Chambers, Kathleen D Liu
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 377, Issue 6, Page 562-572, August 2017.
August 10, 2017: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28754527/ultrasound-use-during-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-is-associated-with-delays-in-chest-compressions
#3
Maite A Huis In 't Veld, Michael G Allison, David S Bostick, Kiondra R Fisher, Olga G Goloubeva, Michael D Witting, Michael E Winters
AIM: High-quality chest compressions are a critical component of the resuscitation of patients in cardiopulmonary arrest. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is used frequently during emergency department (ED) resuscitations, but there has been limited research assessing its benefits and harms during the delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We hypothesized that use of POCUS during cardiac arrest resuscitation adversely affects high-quality CPR by lengthening the duration of pulse checks beyond the current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines recommendation of 10s...
July 25, 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811122/acute-kidney-injury-after-computed-tomography-a-meta-analysis
#4
REVIEW
Ryan D Aycock, Lauren M Westafer, Jennifer L Boxen, Nima Majlesi, Elizabeth M Schoenfeld, Raveendhara R Bannuru
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Computed tomography (CT) is an important imaging modality used in the diagnosis of a variety of disorders. Imaging quality may be improved if intravenous contrast is added, but there is a concern for potential renal injury. Our goal is to perform a meta-analysis to compare the risk of acute kidney injury, need for renal replacement, and total mortality after contrast-enhanced CT versus noncontrast CT. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE (PubMed), the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, ProQuest, and Academic Search Premier for relevant articles...
August 12, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21890890/arterial-waveform-analysis-for-the-anesthesiologist-past-present-and-future-concepts
#5
REVIEW
Robert H Thiele, Marcel E Durieux
Qualitative arterial waveform analysis has been in existence for millennia; quantitative arterial waveform analysis techniques, which can be traced back to Euler's work in the 18th century, have not been widely used by anesthesiologists and other clinicians. This is likely attributable, in part, to the widespread use of the sphygmomanometer, which allows the practitioner to assess arterial blood pressure without having to develop a sense for the higher-order characteristics of the arterial waveform. The 20-year delay in the development of devices that measure these traits is a testament to the primitiveness of our appreciation for this information...
October 2011: Anesthesia and Analgesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28624593/double-sequential-defibrillation-therapy-for-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrests-the-london-experience
#6
Amber C Emmerson, Mark Whitbread, Rachael T Fothergill
BACKGROUND: Despite advances in treatment for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), a subgroup of patients remain in refractory ventricular fibrillation (RVF) during resuscitation. Recent evidence suggests that double sequential defibrillation (DSD), where two shocks are delivered to the patient in quick succession, may provide an effective therapy for RVF. This study describes the characteristics and survival outcomes of OHCA patients treated by ambulance clinicians using a local DSD protocol in an attempt to resolve RVF...
August 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/7497049/colorimetric-end-tidal-co2-detector-for-verification-of-endotracheal-tube-placement-in-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest
#7
S R Hayden, J Sciammarella, P Viccellio, H Thode, R Delagi
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of a disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector to verify proper endotracheal (ET) tube placement in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and to correlate semiquantitative CO2 measurements with the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). METHODS: Prospective, observational study using a convenience sample of intubated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. A disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector was attached to the ET tube after intubation...
June 1995: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/2115315/end-tidal-co2-measurement-in-the-detection-of-esophageal-intubation-during-cardiac-arrest
#8
COMPARATIVE STUDY
A J Sayah, W F Peacock, D T Overton
Measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) has been used to detect accidental esophageal tube placement in noncardiac arrest situations. The purpose of our study was to determine whether ETCO2 measurement could distinguish tracheal from esophageal tube placement during closed-chest massage (CCM). Twelve large dogs were anesthetized, and endotracheal tubes were placed in both the trachea and the esophagus. Placement was verified by fiberoptic endoscopy. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by a 60-Hz discharge through a right ventricular pacemaker...
August 1990: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509668/norepinephrine-in-septic-shock-when-and-how-much
#9
Olfa Hamzaoui, Thomas W L Scheeren, Jean-Louis Teboul
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Norepinephrine is the first-line agent recommended during resuscitation of septic shock to correct hypotension due to depressed vascular tone. Important clinical issues are the best timing to start norepinephrine, the optimal blood pressure target, and the best therapeutic options to face refractory hypotension when high doses of norepinephrine are required to reach the target. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent literature has reported benefits of early administration of norepinephrine because of the following reasons: profound and durable hypotension is an independent factor of increased mortality, early administration of norepinephrine increases cardiac output, improves microcirculation and avoids fluid overload...
August 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499516/improving-cpr-performance
#10
REVIEW
Boulos S Nassar, Richard Kerber
Cardiac arrest continues to represent a public health burden with most patients having dismal outcomes. CPR is a complex set of interventions requiring leadership, coordination, and best practices. Despite the widespread adoption of new evidence in various guidelines, the provision of CPR remains variable with poor adherence to published recommendations. Key steps health-care systems can take to enhance the quality of CPR and, potentially, to improve outcomes, include optimizing chest compressions, avoiding hyperventilation, encouraging intraosseous access, and monitoring capnography...
May 10, 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27618681/early-identification-of-patients-with-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-with-no-chance-of-survival-and-consideration-for-organ-donation
#11
Patricia Jabre, Wulfran Bougouin, Florence Dumas, Pierre Carli, Corinne Antoine, Laurent Jacob, Benjamin Dahan, Frankie Beganton, Jean-Philippe Empana, Eloi Marijon, Nicole Karam, Alexandre Loupy, Carmen Lefaucheur, Daniel Jost, Alain Cariou, Frédéric Adnet, Thomas D Rea, Xavier Jouven
Background: In patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), care requirements can conflict with the need to promptly focus efforts on organ donation in patients who are pronounced dead. Objective: To evaluate objective criteria for identifying patients with OHCA with no chance of survival during the first minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation to enable prompt orientation toward organ donation. Design: Retrospective assessment using OHCA data from 2 registries and 1 trial...
December 6, 2016: Annals of Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27666168/association-between-chest-compression-rates-and-clinical-outcomes-following-in-hospital-cardiac-arrest-at-an-academic-tertiary-hospital
#12
J Hope Kilgannon, Michael Kirchhoff, Lisa Pierce, Nicholas Aunchman, Stephen Trzeciak, Brian W Roberts
AIMS: Recent guidelines for management of cardiac arrest recommend chest compression rates of 100-120 compressions/min. However, animal studies have found cardiac output to increase with rates up to 150 compressions/min. The objective of this study was to test the association between chest compression rates during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and outcome. METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study at a single academic medical center...
January 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28232056/prophylactic-corticosteroids-for-prevention-of-postextubation-stridor-and-reintubation-in-adults-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#13
REVIEW
Akira Kuriyama, Noriyuki Umakoshi, Rao Sun
BACKGROUND: Corticosteroid administration before elective extubation has been used to prevent postextubation stridor and reintubation. We updated a systematic review to identify which patients would benefit from prophylactic corticosteroid administration before elective extubation. METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Wanfang Database, the China Academic Journal Network Publishing Database, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for eligible trials from inception through February 29, 2016...
May 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174032/emergency-medicine-myths-epinephrine-in-cardiac-arrest
#14
Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
BACKGROUND: Sudden cardiac arrest accounts for approximately 15% of deaths in developed nations, with poor survival rate. The American Heart Association states that epinephrine is reasonable for patients with cardiac arrest, though the literature behind its use is not strong. OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence behind epinephrine for cardiac arrest. DISCUSSION: Sudden cardiac arrest causes over 450,000 deaths annually in the United States. The American Heart Association recommends epinephrine may be reasonable in patients with cardiac arrest, as part of Advanced Cardiac Life Support...
February 4, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22370007/factors-complicating-interpretation-of-capnography-during-advanced-life-support-in-cardiac-arrest-a-clinical-retrospective-study-in-575-patients
#15
Bård E Heradstveit, Kjetil Sunde, Geir-Arne Sunde, Tore Wentzel-Larsen, Jon-Kenneth Heltne
BACKGROUND: End tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO(2)) monitoring during advanced life support (ALS) using capnography, is recommended in the latest international guidelines. However, several factors might complicate capnography interpretation during ALS. How the cause of cardiac arrest, initial rhythm, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and time impact on the ETCO(2) values are not completely clear. Thus, we wanted to explore this in out-of-hospital cardiac arrested (OHCA) patients...
July 2012: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28117180/the-role-of-resuscitative-endovascular-balloon-occlusion-of-the-aorta-reboa-as-an-adjunct-to-acls-in-non-traumatic-cardiac-arrest
#16
REVIEW
James Daley, Jonathan James Morrison, John Sather, Lisa Hile
Non-traumatic cardiac arrest is a major public health problem that carries an extremely high mortality rate. If we hope to increase the survivability of this condition, it is imperative that alternative methods of treatment are given due consideration. Balloon occlusion of the aorta can be used as a method of circulatory support in the critically ill patient. Intra-aortic balloon pumps have been used to temporize patients in cardiogenic shock for decades. More recently, resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has been utilized in the patient in hemorrhagic shock or cardiac arrest secondary to trauma...
May 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28098591/surviving-sepsis-campaign-international-guidelines-for-management-of-sepsis-and-septic-shock-2016
#17
Andrew Rhodes, Laura E Evans, Waleed Alhazzani, Mitchell M Levy, Massimo Antonelli, Ricard Ferrer, Anand Kumar, Jonathan E Sevransky, Charles L Sprung, Mark E Nunnally, Bram Rochwerg, Gordon D Rubenfeld, Derek C Angus, Djillali Annane, Richard J Beale, Geoffrey J Bellinghan, Gordon R Bernard, Jean-Daniel Chiche, Craig Coopersmith, Daniel P De Backer, Craig J French, Seitaro Fujishima, Herwig Gerlach, Jorge Luis Hidalgo, Steven M Hollenberg, Alan E Jones, Dilip R Karnad, Ruth M Kleinpell, Younsuck Koh, Thiago Costa Lisboa, Flavia R Machado, John J Marini, John C Marshall, John E Mazuski, Lauralyn A McIntyre, Anthony S McLean, Sangeeta Mehta, Rui P Moreno, John Myburgh, Paolo Navalesi, Osamu Nishida, Tiffany M Osborn, Anders Perner, Colleen M Plunkett, Marco Ranieri, Christa A Schorr, Maureen A Seckel, Christopher W Seymour, Lisa Shieh, Khalid A Shukri, Steven Q Simpson, Mervyn Singer, B Taylor Thompson, Sean R Townsend, Thomas Van der Poll, Jean-Louis Vincent, W Joost Wiersinga, Janice L Zimmerman, R Phillip Dellinger
OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012." DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings (for those committee members attending the conference). A formal conflict-of-interest (COI) policy was developed at the onset of the process and enforced throughout. A stand-alone meeting was held for all panel members in December 2015...
March 2017: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073314/safety-of-the-peripheral-administration-of-vasopressor-agents
#18
Tyler Lewis, Cristian Merchan, Diana Altshuler, John Papadopoulos
Vasopressors are an integral component of the management of septic shock and are traditionally given via a central venous catheter (CVC) due to the risk of tissue injury and necrosis if extravasated. However, the need for a CVC for the management of septic shock has been questioned, and the risk of extravasation and incidence of severe injury when vasopressors are given via a peripheral venous line (PVL) remains poorly defined. We performed a retrospective chart review of 202 patients who received vasopressors through a PVL...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27522622/lactic-acidosis-an-update
#19
REVIEW
Jansen Seheult, Gerard Fitzpatrick, Gerard Boran
Lactate is one of the most crucial intermediates in carbohydrate and nonessential amino acid metabolism. The complexity of cellular interactions and metabolism means that lactate can be considered a waste product for one cell but a useful substrate for another. The presence of elevated lactate levels in critically ill patients has important implications for morbidity and mortality. In this review, we provide a brief outline of the metabolism of lactate, the pathophysiology of lactic acidosis, the clinical significance of D-lactate, the role of lactate measurement in acutely ill patients, the methods used to measure lactate in blood or plasma and some of the methodological issues related to interferences in these assays, especially in the case of ethylene glycol poisoning...
March 1, 2017: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: CCLM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012882/out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-without-return-of-spontaneous-circulation-in-the-field-who-are-the-survivors
#20
Yan Xiong, Hong Zhan, Yuanzheng Lu, Kaipan Guan, Ngozi Okoro, Denise Mitchell, Megan Dwyer, Auna Leatham, Gilberto Salazar, Xiaoxing Liao, Ahamed Idris
BACKGROUND: Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in the field is a vital determinant contributing to survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, nearly one third of survivors at the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) site did not obtain ROSC in the field. METHODS: A retrospective, observational analysis was performed on all adult patients with non-traumatic OHCA treated on scene and transported to hospital, who did not gain ROSC in the field at DFW ROC site between 2006 through 2011...
March 2017: Resuscitation
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