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295 papers 25 to 100 followers
By Luis Trujillo Nefrologo
Lilia Cervantes, Monica Grafals, Rudolph A Rodriguez
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Enver Akalin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 15, 2018: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Deirdre Sawinski, Jayme E Locke
Nearly 100,000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant, yet each year only 11,000 undergo transplantation with a deceased donor kidney. Annual death rates among waitlist registrants range from 5% to 15%; many die before receiving a transplant. Not surprisingly, registrants turn to family and friends to become living kidney donors on their behalf. Living kidney donor selection practices aim to quantify lifetime risk for kidney failure based on a candidate's predonation demographic and health characteristics...
January 11, 2018: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
David M Clive, Vijay K Vanguri
The syndrome of tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU) is a multisystemic autoimmune disorder that may occur in response to various environmental triggers, including drugs and microbial pathogens. Evidence exists of HLA antigen-related genetic predisposition to developing TINU. The resulting inflammation affects chiefly the ocular uvea and renal tubules, although other organs may be involved. TINU is uncommon; only about 200 cases are on record since its original description 40 years ago, although it is possible that new ones are no longer being reported...
February 8, 2018: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
David Y Gaitonde, David L Cook, Ian M Rivera
Chronic kidney disease affects 47 million people in the United States and is associated with significant health care costs, morbidity, and mortality. Because this disease can silently progress to advanced stages, early detection is critical for initiating timely interventions. Multiple guidelines recommend at least annual screening with serum creatinine, urine albumin/creatinine ratio, and urinalysis for patients with risk factors, particularly diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and a history of cardiovascular disease...
December 15, 2017: American Family Physician
C Boer, S M Bossers, N J Koning
The consensus that i.v. resuscitation fluids should be considered as drugs with specific dose recommendations, contraindications, and side-effects has led to an increased attention for the choice of fluid during perioperative care. In particular, the debate concerning possible adverse effects of unbalanced fluids and hydroxyethyl starches resulted in a re-evaluation of the roles of different fluid types in the perioperative setting. This review provides a concise overview of the current knowledge regarding the efficacy and safety of distinct fluid types for perioperative use...
February 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
Avinash K Nehra, Jeffrey A Alexander, Conor G Loftus, Vandana Nehra
First introduced in 1989, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most widely utilized medications worldwide, both in the ambulatory and inpatient clinical settings. The PPIs are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the management of a variety of gastrointestinal disorders including symptomatic peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and nonulcer dyspepsia as well as for prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy. PPIs inhibit gastric acid secretion, and the most commonly associated adverse effects include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and headache...
February 2018: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Kausik Umanath, Julia B Lewis
Diabetic kidney disease and diabetic nephropathy are the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease in the United States and most developed countries. Diabetes accounts for 30% to 50% of the incident cases of end-stage kidney disease in the United States. Although this represents a significant public health concern, it is important to note that only 30% to 40% of patients with diabetes develop diabetic nephropathy. Specific treatment of patients with diabetic nephropathy can be divided into 4 major arenas: cardiovascular risk reduction, glycemic control, blood pressure control, and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS)...
February 2, 2018: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Jonathan Stone, Patrick Hangge, Hassan Albadawi, Alex Wallace, Fadi Shamoun, M Grace Knuttien, Sailendra Naidu, Rahmi Oklu
Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major preventable cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE), affects an estimated 1 per 1,000 people and contributes to 60,000-100,000 deaths annually. Normal blood physiology hinges on a delicate balance between pro- and anti-coagulant factors. Virchow's Triad distills the multitude of risk factors for DVT into three basic elements favoring thrombus formation: venous stasis, vascular injury, and hypercoagulability...
December 2017: Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Therapy
Diego Fornasari
Neuropathic pain, comprising a range of heterogeneous conditions, is often severe and difficult to manage, and this may result in a chronic condition that negatively affects the overall functioning and quality of life in patients. The pharmacotherapy of neuropathic pain is challenging and for many patients effective treatment is lacking; therefore, evidence-based recommendations are essential. Currently, there is general agreement on which drugs are appropriate for the first-line treatment of neuropathic pain, whereas debate continues regarding second- and third-line treatments...
December 2017: Pain and Therapy
Olivier Devuyst, Cristian Pattaro
The identification of genetic factors associated with kidney disease has the potential to provide critical insights into disease mechanisms. Genome-wide association studies have uncovered genomic regions associated with renal function metrics and risk of CKD. UMOD is among the most outstanding loci associated with CKD in the general population, because it has a large effect on eGFR and CKD risk that is consistent across different ethnic groups. The relevance of UMOD for CKD is clear, because the encoded protein, uromodulin (Tamm-Horsfall protein), is exclusively produced by the kidney tubule and has specific biochemical properties that mediate important functions in the kidney and urine...
March 2018: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: JASN
Nishant Gupta, Stephen M Kralovic, Dennis McGraw
Lemierre syndrome is a rare and life-threatening illness. Often referred to as "the forgotten disease," its incidence is reported to be as low as 1 in a million. The microorganism responsible for Lemierre syndrome is typically Fusobacterium necrophorum. The bacterium starts in the pharynx and peritonsillar tissue, then disseminates through lymphatic vessels. Severe sepsis rapidly develops, as does the hallmark of this syndrome: septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. This report describes a case of Lemierre syndrome in a previously healthy 26-year-old man with life-threatening internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis following 2 weeks of an indolent course of pharyngitis...
March 2014: American Journal of Critical Care: An Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Guohui Ren, Nicholas J Tardi, Fumihiko Matsuda, Kwi Hye Koh, Phillip Ruiz, Changli Wei, Mehmet Mete Altintas, Hidde Ploegh, Jochen Reiser
Podocytes are terminally differentiated cells of the kidney filtration barrier with a limited proliferative capacity, and are the primary glomerular target for various sources of cellular stress. Accordingly, it is particularly important for podocytes to cope with stress efficiently to circumvent cell death and avoid compromising renal function. Improperly folded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are associated with increased cellular injury and cell death. To relieve ER stress, protein quality control mechanisms like ER-associated degradation (ERAD) are initiated...
November 22, 2017: American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology
Letiția Adela Maria Streba, Cristin Constantin Vere, Costin Teodor Streba, Marius Eugen Ciurea
Abusive alcohol intake currently ranks as a major cause of liver disease, and is associated with significant mortality worldwide. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) generically defines liver abnormalities ranging from liver steatosis to the end-stages of disease such as liver cirrhosis. Information regarding the precise incidence and prevalence of ALD is still limited by a lack of large population-based studies and by the absence of large systematic reviews of all epidemiological data available. However, existing collected data show an overall increase in the number of alcohol abusers and alcohol-related liver disease...
July 7, 2014: World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG
E Brogi, L Gargani, E Bignami, F Barbariol, A Marra, F Forfori, L Vetrugno
Pleural effusion (PLEFF), mostly caused by volume overload, congestive heart failure, and pleuropulmonary infection, is a common condition in critical care patients. Thoracic ultrasound (TUS) helps clinicians not only to visualize pleural effusion, but also to distinguish between the different types. Furthermore, TUS is essential during thoracentesis and chest tube drainage as it increases safety and decreases life-threatening complications. It is crucial not only during needle or tube drainage insertion, but also to monitor the volume of the drained PLEFF...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Anastasia Slobodnick, Binita Shah, Svetlana Krasnokutsky, Michael H Pillinger
Colchicine is an ancient medication that is currently approved for the treatment of gout and FMF. However, colchicine has a wide range of anti-inflammatory activities, and studies indicate that it may be beneficial in a variety of other conditions. This paper reviews the evidence for the well-established use of colchicine in gout, as well as several other rheumatic diseases. In addition, we highlight the potential benefit of colchicine in cardiac disease, including coronary artery disease in patients both with and without gout...
January 1, 2018: Rheumatology
Yiming Zhou, Philip Castonguay, Eriene-Heidi Sidhom, Abbe R Clark, Moran Dvela-Levitt, Sookyung Kim, Jonas Sieber, Nicolas Wieder, Ji Yong Jung, Svetlana Andreeva, Jana Reichardt, Frank Dubois, Sigrid C Hoffmann, John M Basgen, Mónica S Montesinos, Astrid Weins, Ashley C Johnson, Eric S Lander, Michael R Garrett, Corey R Hopkins, Anna Greka
Progressive kidney diseases are often associated with scarring of the kidney's filtration unit, a condition called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). This scarring is due to loss of podocytes, cells critical for glomerular filtration, and leads to proteinuria and kidney failure. Inherited forms of FSGS are caused by Rac1-activating mutations, and Rac1 induces TRPC5 ion channel activity and cytoskeletal remodeling in podocytes. Whether TRPC5 activity mediates FSGS onset and progression is unknown. We identified a small molecule, AC1903, that specifically blocks TRPC5 channel activity in glomeruli of proteinuric rats...
December 8, 2017: Science
Piero Ruggenenti, Fernando C Fervenza, Giuseppe Remuzzi
In patients with membranous nephropathy, alkylating agents (cyclophosphamide or chlorambucil) alone or in combination with steroids achieve remission of nephrotic syndrome more effectively than conservative treatment or steroids alone, but can cause myelotoxicity, infections, and cancer. Calcineurin inhibitors can improve proteinuria, but are nephrotoxic. Most patients relapse after treatment withdrawal and can become treatment dependent, which increases the risk of nephrotoxicity. The discovery of nephritogenic autoantibodies against podocyte M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2 R) and thrombospondin type-1 domain- containing protein 7A (THSD7A) antigens provides a clear pathophysiological rationale for interventions that specifically target B-cell lineages to prevent antibody production and subepithelial deposition...
September 2017: Nature Reviews. Nephrology
Paola Romagnani, Giuseppe Remuzzi, Richard Glassock, Adeera Levin, Kitty J Jager, Marcello Tonelli, Ziad Massy, Christoph Wanner, Hans-Joachim Anders
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by persistent urine abnormalities, structural abnormalities or impaired excretory renal function suggestive of a loss of functional nephrons. The majority of patients with CKD are at risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease and death. For those who progress to end-stage renal disease, the limited accessibility to renal replacement therapy is a problem in many parts of the world. Risk factors for the development and progression of CKD include low nephron number at birth, nephron loss due to increasing age and acute or chronic kidney injuries caused by toxic exposures or diseases (for example, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus)...
November 23, 2017: Nature Reviews. Disease Primers
Rebecca S B Fischer, Chandan Vangala, Luan Truong, Sreedhar Mandayam, Denis Chavarria, Orlando M Granera Llanes, Marcos U Fonseca Laguna, Alvaro Guerra Baez, Felix Garcia, Ramón García-Trabanino, Kristy O Murray
Mesoamerican nephropathy is a devastating disease of unknown etiology that affects mostly young agricultural workers in Central America. An understanding of the mechanism of injury and the early disease process is urgently needed and will aid in identification of the underlying cause and direct treatment and prevention efforts. We sought to describe the renal pathology in Mesoamerican nephropathy at its earliest clinical appearance in prospectively identified acute case patients in Nicaragua. We considered those with elevated (or increased at least 0...
November 18, 2017: Kidney International
2017-11-30 19:30:13
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