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Sports medicine

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10 papers 25 to 100 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26781131/operative-treatment-of-fifth-metatarsal-jones-fractures-zones-ii-and-iii-in-the-nba
#1
Martin O'Malley, Bridget DeSandis, Answorth Allen, Matthew Levitsky, Quinn O'Malley, Riley Williams
BACKGROUND: Proximal fractures of the fifth metatarsal (zone II and III) are common in the elite athlete and can be difficult to treat because of a tendency toward delayed union, nonunion, or refracture. The purpose of this case series was to report our experience in treating 10 NBA players, determine the healing rate, return to play, refracture rate, and role of foot type in these athletes. METHODS: The records of 10 professional basketball players were retrospectively reviewed...
May 2016: Foot & Ankle International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26786903/concussion-increases-odds-of-sustaining-a-lower-extremity-musculoskeletal-injury-after-return-to-play-among-collegiate-athletes
#2
M Alison Brooks, Kaitlin Peterson, Kevin Biese, Jennifer Sanfilippo, Bryan C Heiderscheit, David R Bell
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have identified abnormalities in brain and motor functioning after concussion that persist well beyond observed clinical recovery. Recent work suggests subtle deficits in neurocognition may impair neuromuscular control and thus potentially increase risk of lower extremity musculoskeletal injury after concussion. PURPOSE: To determine the odds of sustaining an acute lower extremity musculoskeletal injury during the 90-day period after return to play from concussion in a cohort of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I collegiate athletes...
March 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26296816/locomotive-biomechanics-in-persons-with-chronic-ankle-instability-and-lateral-ankle-sprain-copers
#3
Cailbhe Doherty, Chris Bleakley, Jay Hertel, Brian Caulfield, John Ryan, Eamonn Delahunt
OBJECTIVES: To compare the locomotive biomechanics of participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI) to those of lateral ankle sprain (LAS) copers. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Twenty-eight participants with CAI and 42 LAS copers each performed 5 self-selected paced gait trials. 3-D lower extremity temporal kinematic and kinetic data were collected for these participants from 200ms pre- to 200ms post-heel strike (period 1) and from 200ms pre- to 200ms post-toe off (period 2)...
July 2016: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26311978/effects-of-using-an-unstable-inclined-board-on-active-and-passive-ankle-range-of-motion-in-patients-with-ankle-stiffness
#4
Won-Gyu Yoo
[Purpose] The present study assessed the effects of using an unstable inclined board on the active and passive ankle range of motion in patients with ankle stiffness. [Subjects] The study included 10 young female patients with ankle stiffness. [Methods] The patients were divided into the following two groups: a group that performed ankle dorsiflexion stretching exercises using a wooden inclined board and a group that performed stretching exercises using an air-cushioned inclined board (unstable inclined board)...
July 2015: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25825379/when-is-it-too-early-for-single-sport-specialization
#5
REVIEW
Brian T Feeley, Julie Agel, Robert F LaPrade
Over the past 15 years, there has been an increase in youth sports participation with a concomitant increase in early year-round training in a single sport. Many factors contribute to the desire of parents and coaches to encourage early single sport specialization, including the desire to give the young athlete an edge in competition, pursuit of scholarships, and potential professional status, and the ability to label a young athlete as elite at an early age. Despite these perceived advantages, some data suggest that early sport specialization does not lead to a competitive advantage over athletes who participate in multiple sports...
January 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25761852/jump-landing-biomechanics-during-a-laboratory-recorded-recurrent-ankle-sprain
#6
Masafumi Terada, Phillip A Gribble
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2015: Foot & Ankle International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25605413/evaluating-a-standardised-tool-to-explore-the-nature-and-extent-of-foot-and-ankle-injuries-in-amateur-and-semi-professional-footballers
#7
S Evans, K Walker-Bone, S Otter
BACKGROUND: Most studies of football injuries include professional players and data have been collected in without a single validated, standardised tool. We aimed to develop a new standardised questionnaire for assessing injuries among non-professional footballers and pilot its use. METHOD: A questionnaire was developed using input from footballers, healthcare professionals and triangulation from the literature. The new tool was piloted among players representing amateurs and semi-professionals...
March 2015: Foot
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22895873/anatomy-and-physiology-of-hamstring-injury
#8
T Kumazaki, Y Ehara, T Sakai
The hamstring muscles were analyzed anatomically and physiologically to clarify the specific reasons for the incidence of muscle strain of the hamstrings. For the anatomical study, hamstring muscles of 13 embalmed cadavers were dissected. For the physiological study, the knee flexor torque and surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were measured during isometric contraction of hamstring muscles in 10 healthy adults. The biceps femoris muscle long head (BF-L) and semimembranosus muscle (SM) had hemi-pennate architecture and their fiber length per total muscle length (FL/TML) was smaller than that of semtendinosus muscle (ST) and biceps femoris muscle short head (BF-S) with other architecture...
December 2012: International Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22661695/why-hamstring-eccentrics-are-hamstring-essentials
#9
EDITORIAL
Kristian Thorborg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2012: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17263214/management-of-patellofemoral-pain-syndrome
#10
REVIEW
Sameer Dixit, John P DiFiori, Monique Burton, Brandon Mines
Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the most common cause of knee pain in the outpatient setting. It is caused by imbalances in the forces controlling patellar tracking during knee flexion and extension, particularly with overloading of the joint. Risk factors include overuse, trauma, muscle dysfunction, tight lateral restraints, patellar hypermobility, and poor quadriceps flexibility. Typical symptoms include pain behind or around the patella that is increased with running and activities that involve knee flexion...
January 15, 2007: American Family Physician
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