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Dermatitis atópica

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45 papers 0 to 25 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025775/systemic-treatment-of-adult-atopic-dermatitis-a-review
#1
REVIEW
Matteo Megna, Maddalena Napolitano, Cataldo Patruno, Alessia Villani, Anna Balato, Giuseppe Monfrecola, Fabio Ayala, Nicola Balato
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease that predominantly affects children. However, it can persist in adulthood and/or start at older ages. Due to its chronic nature and frequently occurring relapses, AD has a substantial effect on patients' quality of life, often requiring long-term systemic treatment, especially in adult patients, who are more frequently refractory to adequate topical treatment with mid- to high-potent corticosteroids and/or calcineurin inhibitors. Therefore, treatment with systemic therapies is often needed to take control of the disease, prevent exacerbations and improve quality of life...
December 26, 2016: Dermatology and Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886901/itch-in-atopic-dermatitis
#2
REVIEW
Makiko Kido-Nakahara, Masutaka Furue, Dugarmaa Ulzii, Takeshi Nakahara
Chronic itch in inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, markedly diminishes the quality of life of affected individuals. Comprehensive progress has been made in understanding itch signaling and associated mediators in the skin, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, and central nervous system, which may amplify or suppress atopic itch. Conventional therapies for atopic dermatitis are capable of reducing atopic itch; however, most patients are not satisfied with the antipruritic capacity of conventional treatments...
February 2017: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886912/infectious-complications-in-atopic-dermatitis
#3
REVIEW
Di Sun, Peck Y Ong
Atopic dermatitis is characterized by the interplay of skin barrier defects with the immune system and skin microbiome that causes patients to be at risk for infectious complications. This article reviews the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and the mechanisms through which patients are at risk for infection from bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens. Although these complications may be managed acutely, prevention of secondary infections depends on a multipronged approach in the maintenance of skin integrity, control of flares, and microbial pathogens...
February 2017: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913962/bathing-and-associated-treatments-in-atopic-dermatitis
#4
REVIEW
Julia K Gittler, Jason F Wang, Seth J Orlow
Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common complaints presenting to dermatologists, and patients typically inquire as to appropriate bathing recommendations. Although many dermatologists, allergists, and primary-care practitioners provide explicit bathing instructions, recommendations regarding frequency of bathing, duration of bathing, and timing related to emollient and medication application relative to bathing vary widely. Conflicting and vague guidelines stem from knowledge related to the disparate effects of water on skin, as well as a dearth of studies, especially randomized controlled trials, evaluating the effects of water and bathing on the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis...
December 3, 2016: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918470/vitamin-d-status-and-efficacy-of-vitamin-d-supplementation-in-atopic-dermatitis-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#5
Min Jung Kim, Soo-Nyung Kim, Yang Won Lee, Yong Beom Choe, Kyu Joong Ahn
Recent literature has highlighted the possible role of vitamin D in atopic dermatitis (AD), and that vitamin D supplementation might help to treat AD. This study determined the relationship between vitamin D level and AD, and assessed the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases up to May 2015. Observational studies and randomized controlled trials were included based on the available data on the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level and quantified data available for severity assessed using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index or Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) score...
December 3, 2016: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918774/cost-effectiveness-of-prophylactic-moisturization-for-atopic-dermatitis
#6
Shuai Xu, Supriya Immaneni, Gordon B Hazen, Jonathan I Silverberg, Amy S Paller, Peter A Lio
Importance: Emerging evidence suggests that the use of moisturizers on newborns and infants (ie, from birth to 6 months of age) is potentially helpful in preventing the development of atopic dermatitis. Objective: To investigate the cost-effectiveness of using a daily moisturizer as prevention against atopic dermatitis among high-risk newborns. Design, Setting, and Participants: In a cost-effectiveness analysis, the average cost of total-body moisturization using 7 common moisturizers from birth to 6 months of age was determined for male and female infants...
December 5, 2016: JAMA Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27931536/advances-in-atopic-dermatitis-in-2015
#7
REVIEW
Takashi Nomura, Kenji Kabashima
This review aims to highlight recently published articles on atopic dermatitis (AD). Updated are the insights into epidemiology, pathology, diagnostics, and therapy. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a positive correlation between AD and systemic conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and neonatal adiposity. Pathologic findings highlight the involvement of novel barrier factors (desmoplakin and claudin), novel immune cell subsets (pathogenic effector TH2 cells and group 2 innate lymphoid cells), and differential skewing of helper T cells (eg, TH17 dominance in Asians with AD)...
December 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27735066/anti-inflammatory-therapies-in-atopic-dermatitis
#8
REVIEW
A Heratizadeh, T Werfel
The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) is multifactorial and complex. Consequently, clinical signs and symptoms vary strongly depending on individually relevant trigger factors and the stage of the disease. So far, treatment of AD was commonly limited to topical treatment or, in more severe cases, to systemic drugs mostly approved for other indications than AD. However, emerging data on new anti-inflammatory agents have been published in the recent years. As these new substances specifically focus on immune responses in AD, these are partially considered as possible 'breakthrough' in the treatment of AD...
December 2016: Allergy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27741157/the-role-of-vitamin-d-in-allergic-diseases-in-children
#9
Michele Miraglia Del Giudice, Annalisa Allegorico
The role of vitamin D in calcium and phosphate homeostasis is well known; however, in addition to traditional functions, vitamin D modulates a variety of processes, and evidence shows that it has an important role in different allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy. Vitamin D acts by binding to the vitamin D receptor, which is present in a variety of tissues; for this reason it is considered a hormone. One of the most important functions is to modulate the immune system response, both innate and adaptive, by suppressing Th2-type response and increasing natural killer cells...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26788792/how-the-innate-immune-system-trains-immunity-lessons-from-studying-atopic-dermatitis-and-cutaneous-bacteria
#10
REVIEW
Yuliya Skabytska, Susanne Kaesler, Thomas Volz, Tilo Biedermann
The skin is the largest organ at the interface between environment and host. It plays a major protective role against pathogens as physical barrier, as site of first recognition, and as orchestrator of consecutive immune responses. In this process, immunological crosstalk between skin-resident and immune cells is required, and fixed innate immune responses were previously believed to orchestrate adaptive immunity of B and T lymphocytes. Today, we understand that diverse qualities of immune responses to different microbes need to be regulated by also varying responses at the level of first microbe recognition through receptors of the innate immune system...
February 2016: Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft, Journal of the German Society of Dermatology: JDDG
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27667308/filaggrin-failure-from-ichthyosis-vulgaris-to-atopic-eczema-and-beyond
#11
REVIEW
W H I McLean
The main proteinaceous component of the keratohyalin granules within the granular layer keratinocytes of the epidermis is the giant, repetitive polyprotein profilaggrin. When granular layer cells commit to terminal differentiation to form the flattened squames of the stratum corneum, profilaggrin is rapidly cleaved into multiple copies of the 37 kDa filaggrin monomer, which binds to and condenses the keratin cytoskeleton, thereby facilitating cellular compression. Within the stratum corneum, filaggrin is broken down to form natural moisturising factor, a pool of amino acids and derivatives thereof that exerts multiple effects...
October 2016: British Journal of Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27579743/skin-barrier-in-atopic-dermatitis-beyond-filaggrin
#12
Mariana Colombini Zaniboni, Luciana Paula Samorano, Raquel Leão Orfali, Valéria Aoki
Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex pathogenesis, where changes in skin barrier and imbalance of the immune system are relevant factors. The skin forms a mechanic and immune barrier, regulating water loss from the internal to the external environment, and protecting the individual from external aggressions, such as microorganisms, ultraviolet radiation and physical trauma. Main components of the skin barrier are located in the outer layers of the epidermis (such as filaggrin), the proteins that form the tight junction (TJ) and components of the innate immune system...
July 2016: Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27483258/molecular-mechanisms-of-cutaneous-inflammatory-disorder-atopic-dermatitis
#13
REVIEW
Jung Eun Kim, Jong Sic Kim, Dae Ho Cho, Hyun Jeong Park
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease resulting from interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. The pathogenesis of AD is poorly understood, and the treatment of recalcitrant AD is still challenging. There is accumulating evidence for new gene polymorphisms related to the epidermal barrier function and innate and adaptive immunity in patients with AD. Newly-found T cells and dendritic cell subsets, cytokines, chemokines and signaling pathways have extended our understanding of the molecular pathomechanism underlying AD...
July 30, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27474122/the-skin-microbiome-is-different-in%C3%A2-pediatric-versus-adult-atopic-dermatitis
#14
Baochen Shi, Nathanael J Bangayan, Emily Curd, Patricia A Taylor, Richard L Gallo, Donald Y M Leung, Huiying Li
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27239428/s2k-guideline-on-diagnosis-and-treatment-of-atopic-dermatitis-short-version
#15
Thomas Werfel, Annice Heratizadeh, Werner Aberer, Frank Ahrens, Matthias Augustin, Tilo Biedermann, Thomas Diepgen, Regina Fölster-Holst, Uwe Gieler, Julia Kahle, Alexander Kapp, Alexander Nast, Katja Nemat, Hagen Ott, Bernhard Przybilla, Martin Roecken, Martin Schlaeger, Peter Schmid-Grendelmeier, Jochen Schmitt, Thomas Schwennesen, Doris Staab, Margitta Worm
Atopic dermatitis (AD) represents a pruritic, non-contagious, chronic or chronically relapsing, inflammatory skin disease. The course of the disease may be complicated by bacterial or viral superinfections. The first manifestation of the disease and further flare-ups are due to genetic predisposition and also to a variety of further trigger factors. The therapy regimen should be adapted to disease symptoms that are actually present and consider individual features of the disease as reported by the patients or their parents...
2016: Allergo Journal International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27283509/crisaborole-and-its-potential-role-in-treating-atopic-dermatitis-overview-of-early-clinical-studies
#16
L T Zane, S Chanda, K Jarnagin, D B Nelson, L Spelman, Lf Stein Gold
Atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory skin disease that is characterized by intense pruritus and eczematous lesions with up to 90% of patients presenting with mild to moderate disease. Current topical treatments for AD have not changed in over 15 years and are associated with safety concerns. In AD, overactivity of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), leads to inflammation and disease exacerbation. Crisaborole Topical Ointment, 2%, is a novel, nonsteroidal, topical anti-inflammatory PDE4 inhibitor currently being investigated for the treatment of mild to moderate AD...
July 2016: Immunotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27267134/systematic-review-of-published-trials-long-term-safety-of-topical-corticosteroids-and-topical-calcineurin-inhibitors-in-pediatric-patients-with-atopic-dermatitis
#17
Elaine C Siegfried, Jennifer C Jaworski, Jennifer D Kaiser, Adelaide A Hebert
BACKGROUND: Many clinicians have concerns about the safety of atopic dermatitis (AD) treatments, particularly in children requiring long-term daily maintenance therapy. Topical corticosteroids (TCS) have been widely used for >5 decades. Long-term TCS monotherapy has been associated with adverse cutaneous effects including atrophy, rebound flares, and increased percutaneous absorption with potential for adverse systemic effects. Topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs), tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, available for 1-2 decades, are not associated with atrophy or increased percutaneous absorption after prolonged use and have much lower potential for systemic effects...
June 7, 2016: BMC Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27165566/addressing-treatment-challenges-in-atopic-dermatitis-with-novel-topical-therapies
#18
Jonathan I Silverberg, Diane B Nelson, Gil Yosipovitch
Atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting children and adults, presents as mild-to-moderate disease in the majority of patients. Pruritus, one of the key diagnostic criteria for AD, is associated with reduced quality of life and disease aggravation. Current treatments include emollients and topical pharmaceutical agents. Topical corticosteroids (TCSs) are commonly used, but are associated with safety concerns with cutaneous and systemic side effects. Topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs) inhibit T-lymphocyte activation, but their use is limited because of application-site infections and a boxed warning for potential malignancy risk...
November 2016: Journal of Dermatological Treatment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27134696/debates-in-allergy-medicine-specific-immunotherapy-efficiency-in-children-with-atopic-dermatitis
#19
Tatiana A Slavyanakaya, Vladislava V Derkach, Revaz I Sepiashvili
Allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been the only pathogenetically relevant treatment of IgE-mediated allergic diseases (ADs) for many years. The use of AIT for atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment is dubious and has both followers and opponents. The improvement of subcutaneous AIT (SCIT) and introduction of Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) gives prospects of their application both for adults and children suffering from AD. This review presents results of scientific research, system and meta-analyses that confirm the clinical efficacy of AIT for children with AD who has the sensitization to allergens of house dust mite, grass and plant pollen suffering from co-occurring respiratory ADs and with moderate and severe course of allergic AD...
2016: World Allergy Organization Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27134697/debates-in-allergy-medicine-specific-immunotherapy-in-children-with-atopic-dermatitis-the-con-view
#20
David N Ginsberg, Lawrence F Eichenfield
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic skin condition in children that has a proven association with other atopic conditions and allergies. These associations, like the general pathophysiology of AD, are complex and not fully understood. While there is evidence for the efficacy of specific immunotherapy (SIT) in pediatric asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR), there is a lack of strong data to support its use in AD. IgE has been shown to be elevated in many patients with AD, but it is an unreliable biomarker due to variability and great fluctuation over time, poor positive predictive value for clinically relevant allergy, and poor correlation with disease state...
2016: World Allergy Organization Journal
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