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ARDS

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58 papers 25 to 100 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28000204/early-severe-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-what-s-going-on-part-i-pathophysiology
#1
Fabrice Petitjeans, Cyrille Pichot, Marco Ghignone, Luc Quintin
Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, PaO₂/FiO₂ < 100 on PEEP ≥ 5 cm H₂O) is treated using controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV), recently combined with muscle relaxation for 48 h and prone positioning. While the amplitude of tidal volume appears set < 6 mL kg⁻¹, the level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) remains controversial. This overview summarizes several salient points, namely: a) ARDS is an oxygenation defect: consolidation/ difuse alveolar damage is reversed by PEEP and/or prone positioning, at least during the early phase of ARDS b) ARDS is a dynamic disease and partially iatrogenic...
2016: Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28000205/early-severe-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-what-s-going-on-part-ii-controlled-vs-spontaneous-ventilation
#2
Fabrice Petitjeans, Cyrille Pichot, Marco Ghignone, Luc Quintin
The second part of this overview on early severe ARDS delineates the pros and cons of the following: a) controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV: lowered oxygen consumption and perfect patient-to-ventilator synchrony), to be used during acute cardio-ventilatory distress in order to "buy time" and correct circulatory insufficiency and metabolic defects (acidosis, etc.); b) spontaneous ventilation (SV: improved venous return, lowered intrathoracic pressure, absence of muscle atrophy). Given a stabilized early severe ARDS, as soon as the overall clinical situation improves, spontaneous ventilation will be used with the following stringent conditionalities: upfront circulatory optimization, upright positioning, lowered VO2, lowered acidotic and hypercapnic drives, sedation without ventilatory depression and without lowered muscular tone, as well as high PEEP (titrated on transpulmonary pressure, or as a second best: "trial"-PEEP) with spontaneous ventilation + pressure support (or newer modes of ventilation)...
2016: Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28040987/fifty-years-of-research-in-ards-is-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-preventable-disease
#3
Hemang Yadav, B Taylor Thompson, Ognjen Gajic
Despite significant advances in our understanding and management of patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), the morbidity and mortality from ARDS remains unacceptably high. Given the consistent failure to find effective treatments for established ARDS, the strategic focus of ARDS research has shifted towards identifying patients with or at high risk of ARDS early in the course of the underlying illness where strategies to reduce the development and progression of ARDS and associated organ failures can be systematically evaluated...
December 31, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898436/golden-anniversary-of-the-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-still-much-work-to-do
#4
Jesús Villar, Arthur S Slutsky
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Over the past 50 years, we have developed a conceptual model of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and have witnessed significant advances in the care of patients with ARDS. In this commentary, we will discuss recent published articles reporting or suggesting new conceptual models for diagnosis, classification, stratification, prevention, ventilatory management, pharmacologic treatment, and outcome prediction of ARDS. RECENT FINDINGS: This review is a tribute to all clinicians and investigators that have contributed to a better understanding of ARDS...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898438/rescue-therapies-for-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-what-to-try-first
#5
Onnen Moerer, Tommaso Tonetti, Michael Quintel
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Severe respiratory failure due to the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) might require rescue therapy measures beyond even extended standard care to ensure adequate oxygenation and survival. This review provides a summary and assessment of treatment options that can be beneficial when the standard approach fails. RECENT FINDINGS: 'Life-threatening' conditions or refractory hypoxemia during mechanical ventilation are more a matter of personal rating than an objective diagnosis based on defined and/or unanimously agreed thresholds that would mandate the use of rescue therapies...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898439/limiting-sedation-for-patients-with-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-time-to-wake-up
#6
Faraaz Ali Shah, Timothy D Girard, Sachin Yende
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may require sedation in their clinical care. The goals of sedation in ARDS patients are to improve patient comfort and tolerance of supportive and therapeutic measures without contributing to adverse outcomes. This review discusses the current evidence for sedation management in patients with ARDS. RECENT FINDINGS: Deep sedation strategies should be avoided in the care of patients with ARDS because deep sedation has been associated with increased time on mechanical ventilation, longer ICU and hospital length of stay, and higher mortality in critically ill patients...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906708/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-mimics-the-role-of-lung-biopsy
#7
Mylène Aublanc, Sophie Perinel, Claude Guérin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mimics is a condition looking like ARDS but that does not fulfill every criterion according to the recent Berlin definition. The purpose of this review is to better delineate ARDS mimics, to discuss why the complete diagnosis of ARDS is important, and to make a brief overview on the role of open lung biopsy in this setting. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent autopsy and lung biopsy data from ARDS patients compared lung histologic findings with the new Berlin definition of ARDS...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906709/looking-closer-at-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-the-role-of-advanced-imaging-techniques
#8
Giacomo Bellani, Jean-Jaques Rouby, Jean-Michel Constantin, Antonio Pesenti
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Advanced imaging techniques have provided invaluable insights in understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the effect of therapeutic strategies, thanks to the possibility of gaining regional information and moving from simple 'anatomical' information to in-vivo functional imaging. RECENT FINDINGS: Computed tomography (CT) led to the understanding of several ARDS mechanisms and interaction with mechanical ventilation. It is nowadays frequently part of routine diagnostic workup, often leading to treatment changes...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875409/extracorporeal-membrane-oxygenation-beyond-rescue-therapy-for-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#9
Alain Combes, Nicolas Bréchot, Charles-Edouard Luyt, Matthieu Schmidt
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article summarizes the results of past and more recent series on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) and discusses its potential indications beyond the rescue of patients with lung failure refractory to conventional mechanical ventilation. RECENT FINDINGS: Successful VV-ECMO treatment in patients with extremely severe influenza A(H1N1)-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and positive results of the CESAR trial have led to an exponential use of the technology in recent years...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27867583/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-after-cardiac-surgery
#10
REVIEW
Lisa Q Rong, Antonino Di Franco, Mario Gaudino
Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a leading cause of postoperative respiratory failure, with a mortality rate approaching 40% in the general population and 80% in the subset of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The increased risk of ARDS in these patients has traditionally been associated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the need for blood product transfusions, large volume shifts, mechanical ventilation and direct surgical insult. Indeed, the impact of ARDS in the cardiac population is substantial, affecting not only survival but also in-hospital length of stay and long-term physical and psychological morbidity...
October 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842745/managing-acute-lung-injury
#11
REVIEW
Gregory A Schmidt
The foundation of mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome involves limiting lung overdistention by using small tidal volumes or transpulmonary pressures. Potential for additional lung recruitment with higher positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) should be assessed. When stress index indicates tidal recruitment-derecruitment, PEEP is increased to higher values. Alternatively, a high PEEP table is used in all patients. When these conventional approaches are insufficient to sustain acceptable gas exchange, rescue is attempted using extracorporeal therapies, airway pressure-release ventilation, inhaled vasodilators, or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27790273/clinical-practice-guideline-of-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#12
REVIEW
Young-Jae Cho, Jae Young Moon, Ein-Soon Shin, Je Hyeong Kim, Hoon Jung, So Young Park, Ho Cheol Kim, Yun Su Sim, Chin Kook Rhee, Jaemin Lim, Seok Jeong Lee, Won-Yeon Lee, Hyun Jeong Lee, Sang Hyun Kwak, Eun Kyeong Kang, Kyung Soo Chung, Won-Il Choi
There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment...
October 2016: Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27757516/potentially-modifiable-factors-contributing-to-outcome-from-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-the-lung-safe-study
#13
John G Laffey, Giacomo Bellani, Tài Pham, Eddy Fan, Fabiana Madotto, Ednan K Bajwa, Laurent Brochard, Kevin Clarkson, Andres Esteban, Luciano Gattinoni, Frank van Haren, Leo M Heunks, Kiyoyasu Kurahashi, Jon Henrik Laake, Anders Larsson, Daniel F McAuley, Lia McNamee, Nicolas Nin, Haibo Qiu, Marco Ranieri, Gordon D Rubenfeld, B Taylor Thompson, Hermann Wrigge, Arthur S Slutsky, Antonio Pesenti
PURPOSE: To improve the outcome of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), one needs to identify potentially modifiable factors associated with mortality. METHODS: The large observational study to understand the global impact of severe acute respiratory failure (LUNG SAFE) was an international, multicenter, prospective cohort study of patients with severe respiratory failure, conducted in the winter of 2014 in a convenience sample of 459 ICUs from 50 countries across five continents...
October 18, 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27741949/hydrocortisone-treatment-in-early-sepsis-associated-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-results-of-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#14
Surat Tongyoo, Chairat Permpikul, Wasineenart Mongkolpun, Veerapong Vattanavanit, Suthipol Udompanturak, Mehmet Kocak, G Umberto Meduri
BACKGROUND: Authors of recent meta-analyses have reported that prolonged glucocorticoid treatment is associated with significant improvements in patients with severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) of multifactorial etiology. A prospective randomized trial limited to patients with sepsis-associated ARDS is lacking. The objective of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of hydrocortisone treatment in sepsis-associated ARDS. METHODS: In this double-blind, single-center (Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok), randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we recruited adult patients with severe sepsis within 12 h of their meeting ARDS criteria...
October 15, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27558174/end-inspiratory-pause-prolongation-in-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-patients-effects-on-gas-exchange-and-mechanics
#15
Hernan Aguirre-Bermeo, Indalecio Morán, Maurizio Bottiroli, Stefano Italiano, Francisco José Parrilla, Eugenia Plazolles, Ferran Roche-Campo, Jordi Mancebo
BACKGROUND: End-inspiratory pause (EIP) prolongation decreases dead space-to-tidal volume ratio (Vd/Vt) and PaCO2. We do not know the physiological benefits of this approach to improve respiratory system mechanics in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients when mild hypercapnia is of no concern. METHODS: The investigation was conducted in an intensive care unit of a university hospital, and 13 ARDS patients were included. The study was designed in three phases...
December 2016: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27445567/the-role-of-open-lung-biopsy-in-critically-ill-patients-with-hypoxic-respiratory-failure-a-retrospective-cohort-study
#16
Abdullah Almotairi, Sharmistha Biswas, Jason Shahin
Background. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of open lung biopsy in patients with hypoxic respiratory failure of unknown etiology admitted to an ICU and to examine the use of steroid therapy in this patient population. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was performed of all consecutive patients admitted to three tertiary care, university-affiliated, ICUs during the period from January 2000 to January 2012 with the principal diagnosis of hypoxic respiratory failure and who underwent an open lung biopsy...
2016: Canadian Respiratory Journal: Journal of the Canadian Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27400909/treatment-of-ards-with-prone-positioning
#17
REVIEW
Eric L Scholten, Jeremy R Beitler, G Kim Prisk, Atul Malhotra
Prone positioning was first proposed in the 1970s as a method to improve gas exchange in ARDS. Subsequent observations of dramatic improvement in oxygenation with simple patient rotation motivated the next several decades of research. This work elucidated the physiological mechanisms underlying changes in gas exchange and respiratory mechanics with prone ventilation. However, translating physiological improvements into a clinical benefit has proved challenging; several contemporary trials showed no major clinical benefits with prone positioning...
January 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27255913/severe-hypoxemia-which-strategy-to-choose
#18
REVIEW
Davide Chiumello, Matteo Brioni
BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by a noncardiogenic pulmonary edema with bilateral chest X-ray opacities and reduction in lung compliance, and the hallmark of the syndrome is hypoxemia refractory to oxygen therapy. Severe hypoxemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100 mmHg), which defines severe ARDS, can be found in 20-30 % of the patients and is associated with the highest mortality rate. Although the standard supportive treatment remains mechanical ventilation (noninvasive and invasive), possible adjuvant therapies can be considered...
June 3, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27235312/should-airway-pressure-release-ventilation-be-the-primary-mode-in-ards
#19
Eduardo Mireles-Cabodevila, Robert M Kacmarek
Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) was originally described as a mode to treat lung-injured patients with the goal to maintain a level of airway pressure that would not depress the cardiac function, deliver mechanical breaths without excessive airway pressure, and to allow unrestricted spontaneous ventilation. Indeed, based on its design, APRV has technological features that serve the goals of safety and comfort. Animal studies suggest that APRV leads to alveolar stability and recruitment which result in less lung injury...
June 2016: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27235314/should-high-frequency-ventilation-in-the-adult-be-abandoned
#20
Albert P Nguyen, Ulrich H Schmidt, Neil R MacIntyre
High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) can improve ventilation-perfusion matching without excessive alveolar tidal stretching or collapse-reopening phenomenon. This is an attractive feature in the ventilation of patients with ARDS. However, two recent large multi-center trials of HFOV failed to show benefits in this patient population. The following review addresses whether, in view of these trails, HFOV should be abandoned in the adult population?
June 2016: Respiratory Care
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