collection
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

ARDS

shared collection
74 papers 25 to 100 followers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28500585/systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-complications-and-mortality-of-veno-venous-extracorporeal-membrane-oxygenation-for-refractory-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#1
REVIEW
Sergi Vaquer, Candelaria de Haro, Paula Peruga, Joan Carles Oliva, Antonio Artigas
Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for refractory acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a rapidly expanding technique. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the most recent literature to analyse complications and hospital mortality associated with this technique. Using the PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analysis, MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for studies reporting complications and hospital mortality of adult patients receiving veno-venous ECMO for severe and refractory ARDS...
December 2017: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28642106/extracorporeal-membrane-oxygenation-for%C3%A2-adult-respiratory-failure-2017-update
#2
REVIEW
Darryl Abrams, Daniel Brodie
The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for respiratory failure in adults is growing rapidly, driven in large part by advances in technology, which have made ECMO devices easier to implement and safer and more efficient. Accompanying this increase in use is a nearly exponential increase in ECMO-related literature. However, the great majority of the literature is composed of retrospective observational data, often in the form of single-center studies with relatively small numbers of subjects. The overall lack of high-quality data, including prospective randomized trials, makes it difficult to justify the rate at which ECMO use is increasing and calls attention to the need for more rigorously designed studies...
September 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28684287/high-frequency-oscillatory-ventilation-in-adults-with-ards-past-present-and-future
#3
REVIEW
Michael C Sklar, Eddy Fan, Ewan C Goligher
High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is a unique mode of mechanical ventilation that uses nonconventional gas exchange mechanisms to deliver ventilation at very low tidal volumes and high frequencies. The properties of HFOV make it a potentially ideal mode to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury in patients with ARDS. Despite a compelling physiological basis and promising experimental data, large randomized controlled trials have not detected an improvement in survival with the use of HFOV, and its use as an early lung-protective strategy in patients with ARDS may be harmful...
July 3, 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28823812/oxygenation-saturation-index-predicts-clinical-outcomes-in-ards
#4
Katherine DesPrez, J Brennan McNeil, Chunxue Wang, Julie A Bastarache, Ciara M Shaver, Lorraine B Ware
BACKGROUND: Traditional measures of ARDS severity such as Pao2/Fio2 may not reliably predict clinical outcomes. The oxygenation index (OI [Fio2 × mean airway pressure × 100)/Pao2]) may more accurately reflect ARDS severity but requires arterial blood gas measurement. We hypothesized that the oxygenation saturation index (OSI [Fio2 × mean airway pressure × 100)/oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (Spo2)]) is a reliable noninvasive surrogate for the OI that is associated with hospital mortality and ventilator-free days (VFDs) in patients with ARDS...
August 16, 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815092/zinc-chloride-smoke-inhalation-induced-severe-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-first-survival-in-the-united-states-with-extended-duration-five-weeks-therapy-with-high-dose-corticosteroids-in-combination-with-lung-protective-ventilation
#5
Hafiz Mahboob, Robert Richeson Iii, Robert McCain
Zinc chloride smoke bomb exposure is frequently seen in military drills, combat exercises, metal industry works, and disaster simulations. Smoke exposure presents with variety of pulmonary damage based on the intensity of the exposure. Smoke induced severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is often fatal and there are no standard treatment guidelines. We report the first survival of smoke induced severe ARDS in the United States (US) with prolonged use of high dose steroids (five weeks) and lung protective ventilation alone...
2017: Case Reports in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28306327/fifty-years-of-research-in-ards-respiratory-mechanics-in-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#6
REVIEW
William R Henderson, Lu Chen, Marcelo B P Amato, Laurent J Brochard
Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a multifactorial lung injury that continues to be associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Mechanical ventilation, although lifesaving, is associated with new iatrogenic injury. Current best practice involves the use of small Vt, low plateau and driving pressures, and high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure. Collectively, these interventions are termed "lung-protective ventilation." Recent investigations suggest that individualized measurements of pulmonary mechanical variables rather than population-based ventilation prescriptions may be used to set the ventilator with the potential to improve outcomes beyond those achieved with standard lung protective ventilation...
October 1, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459322/fifty-years-of-research-in-ards-is-extracorporeal-circulation-the-future-of-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-management
#7
REVIEW
Alain Combes, Antonio Pesenti, V Marco Ranieri
Mechanical ventilation (MV) remains the cornerstone of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) management. It guarantees sufficient alveolar ventilation, high FiO2 concentration, and high positive end-expiratory pressure levels. However, experimental and clinical studies have accumulated, demonstrating that MV also contributes to the high mortality observed in patients with ARDS by creating ventilator-induced lung injury. Under these circumstances, extracorporeal lung support (ECLS) may be beneficial in two distinct clinical settings: to rescue patients from the high risk for death associated with severe hypoxemia, hypercapnia, or both not responding to maximized conventional MV, and to replace MV and minimize/abolish the harmful effects of ventilator-induced lung injury...
May 1, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459336/an-official-american-thoracic-society-european-society-of-intensive-care-medicine-society-of-critical-care-medicine-clinical-practice-guideline-mechanical-ventilation-in-adult-patients-with-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#8
Eddy Fan, Lorenzo Del Sorbo, Ewan C Goligher, Carol L Hodgson, Laveena Munshi, Allan J Walkey, Neill K J Adhikari, Marcelo B P Amato, Richard Branson, Roy G Brower, Niall D Ferguson, Ognjen Gajic, Luciano Gattinoni, Dean Hess, Jordi Mancebo, Maureen O Meade, Daniel F McAuley, Antonio Pesenti, V Marco Ranieri, Gordon D Rubenfeld, Eileen Rubin, Maureen Seckel, Arthur S Slutsky, Daniel Talmor, B Taylor Thompson, Hannah Wunsch, Elizabeth Uleryk, Jan Brozek, Laurent J Brochard
BACKGROUND: This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the use of mechanical ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: A multidisciplinary panel conducted systematic reviews and metaanalyses of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations. RESULTS: For all patients with ARDS, the recommendation is strong for mechanical ventilation using lower tidal volumes (4-8 ml/kg predicted body weight) and lower inspiratory pressures (plateau pressure < 30 cm H2O) (moderate confidence in effect estimates)...
May 1, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446599/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#9
REVIEW
Marco Confalonieri, Francesco Salton, Francesco Fabiano
Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data...
June 30, 2017: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284294/optimal-strategies-for-severe-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#10
REVIEW
Jeremy W Cannon, Jacob T Gutsche, Daniel Brodie
Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) occurs in more than 10% of intensive care unit admissions and in nearly 25% of ventilated patients. Mortality remains high at 40%, and, for patients who survive, recovery continues for months or even years. Early recognition and minimizing further lung injury remain essential to successful management of severe ARDS. Advanced treatment strategies, which complement lung protective ventilation, include short-term neuromuscular blockade, prone positioning, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation...
April 2017: Critical Care Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28236174/prone-positioning-in-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-after-abdominal-surgery-a-multicenter-retrospective-study-sapronadonf-study-of-ards-and-prone-position-after-abdominal-surgery-in-france
#11
Stéphane Gaudry, Samuel Tuffet, Anne-Claire Lukaszewicz, Christian Laplace, Noémie Zucman, Marc Pocard, Bruno Costaglioli, Simon Msika, Jacques Duranteau, Didier Payen, Didier Dreyfuss, David Hajage, Jean-Damien Ricard
BACKGROUND: The recent demonstration of prone position's strong benefit on patient survival has rendered proning a major therapeutic intervention in severe ARDS. Uncertainties remain as to whether or not ARDS patients in the postoperative period of abdominal surgery should be turned prone because of the risk of abdominal complications. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of surgical complications between patients with and without prone position after abdominal surgery. METHODS: This study was a multicenter retrospective cohort of patients with ARDS in a context of recent abdominal surgery...
December 2017: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28245137/severity-of-hypoxemia-and-effect-of-high-frequency-oscillatory-ventilation-in-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#12
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Maureen O Meade, Duncan Young, Steven Hanna, Qi Zhou, Thomas E Bachman, Casper Bollen, Arthur S Slutsky, Sarah E Lamb, Neill K J Adhikari, Spyros D Mentzelopoulos, Deborah J Cook, Sachin Sud, Roy G Brower, B Taylor Thompson, Sanjoy Shah, Alex Stenzler, Gordon Guyatt, Niall D Ferguson
RATIONALE: High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is theoretically beneficial for lung protection, but the results of clinical trials are inconsistent, with study-level meta-analyses suggesting no significant effect on mortality. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this individual patient data meta-analysis was to identify acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patient subgroups with differential outcomes from HFOV. METHODS: After a comprehensive search for trials, two reviewers independently identified randomized trials comparing HFOV with conventional ventilation for adults with ARDS...
September 15, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28146637/fifty-years-of-research-in-ards-insight-into-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-from-models-to-patients
#13
REVIEW
John G Laffey, Brian P Kavanagh
Clinicians who treat patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) use information and guidance from a wide array of sources, ranging from laboratory experiments, clinical data, health services research, intuition, to personal experience. Each of these sources of information brings unique methodology and information, but each is inherently limited. Because ARDS is a syndrome (and not a disease), the clinician or scientist must take additional care when applying knowledge to individual patients among a group, because patients often do not have identical lung pathophysiology...
July 1, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28146639/fifty-years-of-research-in-ards-setting-positive-end-expiratory-pressure-in-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#14
REVIEW
Sarina K Sahetya, Ewan C Goligher, Roy G Brower
Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been used during mechanical ventilation since the first description of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the subsequent decades, many different strategies for optimally titrating PEEP have been proposed. Higher PEEP can improve arterial oxygenation, reduce tidal lung stress and strain, and promote more homogenous ventilation by preventing alveolar collapse at end expiration. However, PEEP may also cause circulatory depression and contribute to ventilator-induced lung injury through alveolar overdistention...
June 1, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157386/fifty-years-of-research-in-ards-the-epidemiology-of-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-50th-birthday-review
#15
Tài Pham, Gordon D Rubenfeld
Since its first description 50 years ago, no other intensive care syndrome has been as extensively studied as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite this extensive body of research, many basic epidemiologic questions remain unsolved. The lack of gold standard tests jeopardizes accurate diagnosis and translational research. Wide variation in the population incidence has been reported, making even simple estimates of the burden of disease problematic. Despite these limitations, there has been an increase in the understanding of pathophysiology and important risk factors both for the development of ARDS and for important patient-centered outcomes like mortality...
April 1, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28127231/mechanical-ventilation-during-extracorporeal-membrane-oxygenation-in-patients-with-acute-severe-respiratory-failure
#16
REVIEW
Zhongheng Zhang, Wan-Jie Gu, Kun Chen, Hongying Ni
Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed...
2017: Canadian Respiratory Journal: Journal of the Canadian Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28000204/early-severe-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-what-s-going-on-part-i-pathophysiology
#17
REVIEW
Fabrice Petitjeans, Cyrille Pichot, Marco Ghignone, Luc Quintin
Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, PaO₂/FiO₂ < 100 on PEEP ≥ 5 cm H₂O) is treated using controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV), recently combined with muscle relaxation for 48 h and prone positioning. While the amplitude of tidal volume appears set < 6 mL kg⁻¹, the level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) remains controversial. This overview summarizes several salient points, namely: a) ARDS is an oxygenation defect: consolidation/ difuse alveolar damage is reversed by PEEP and/or prone positioning, at least during the early phase of ARDS b) ARDS is a dynamic disease and partially iatrogenic...
2016: Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28000205/early-severe-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-what-s-going-on-part-ii-controlled-vs-spontaneous-ventilation
#18
REVIEW
Fabrice Petitjeans, Cyrille Pichot, Marco Ghignone, Luc Quintin
The second part of this overview on early severe ARDS delineates the pros and cons of the following: a) controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV: lowered oxygen consumption and perfect patient-to-ventilator synchrony), to be used during acute cardio-ventilatory distress in order to "buy time" and correct circulatory insufficiency and metabolic defects (acidosis, etc.); b) spontaneous ventilation (SV: improved venous return, lowered intrathoracic pressure, absence of muscle atrophy). Given a stabilized early severe ARDS, as soon as the overall clinical situation improves, spontaneous ventilation will be used with the following stringent conditionalities: upfront circulatory optimization, upright positioning, lowered VO2, lowered acidotic and hypercapnic drives, sedation without ventilatory depression and without lowered muscular tone, as well as high PEEP (titrated on transpulmonary pressure, or as a second best: "trial"-PEEP) with spontaneous ventilation + pressure support (or newer modes of ventilation)...
2016: Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28040987/fifty-years-of-research-in-ards-is-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-preventable-disease
#19
REVIEW
Hemang Yadav, B Taylor Thompson, Ognjen Gajic
Despite significant advances in our understanding and management of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the morbidity and mortality from ARDS remains high. Given the limited number of effective treatments for established ARDS, the strategic focus of ARDS research has shifted toward identifying patients with or at high risk of ARDS early in the course of the underlying illness, when strategies to reduce the development and progression of ARDS and associated organ failures can be systematically evaluated...
March 15, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898436/golden-anniversary-of-the-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-still-much-work-to-do
#20
Jesús Villar, Arthur S Slutsky
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Over the past 50 years, we have developed a conceptual model of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and have witnessed significant advances in the care of patients with ARDS. In this commentary, we will discuss recent published articles reporting or suggesting new conceptual models for diagnosis, classification, stratification, prevention, ventilatory management, pharmacologic treatment, and outcome prediction of ARDS. RECENT FINDINGS: This review is a tribute to all clinicians and investigators that have contributed to a better understanding of ARDS...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
label_collection
label_collection
5025
1
2
2016-12-07 22:27:23
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"