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Congenital Heart Dis, nice reviews!!

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3 papers 0 to 25 followers
By Javier Castro Heart Failure And Heart Transplantation
Michael Grattan, Luc Mertens
Despite improved surgical techniques, preoperative and postoperative care, patients with functionally univentricular hearts (UVH) continue to have high morbidity and mortality and a decreased lifespan. Ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction is a major contributing factor to Fontan patient outcome. The evaluation of ventricular function in patients with UVH is particularly challenging. At a cellular and ultrastructural level, there are inherent differences between single and biventricular right and left ventricles...
August 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Jeffrey A Feinstein, D Woodrow Benson, Anne M Dubin, Meryl S Cohen, Dawn M Maxey, William T Mahle, Elfriede Pahl, Juan VillafaƱe, Ami B Bhatt, Lynn F Peng, Beth Ann Johnson, Alison L Marsden, Curt J Daniels, Nancy A Rudd, Christopher A Caldarone, Kathleen A Mussatto, David L Morales, D Dunbar Ivy, J William Gaynor, James S Tweddell, Barbara J Deal, Anke K Furck, Geoffrey L Rosenthal, Richard G Ohye, Nancy S Ghanayem, John P Cheatham, Wayne Tworetzky, Gerard R Martin
In the recent era, no congenital heart defect has undergone a more dramatic change in diagnostic approach, management, and outcomes than hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). During this time, survival to the age of 5 years (including Fontan) has ranged from 50% to 69%, but current expectations are that 70% of newborns born today with HLHS may reach adulthood. Although the 3-stage treatment approach to HLHS is now well founded, there is significant variation among centers. In this white paper, we present the current state of the art in our understanding and treatment of HLHS during the stages of care: 1) pre-Stage I: fetal and neonatal assessment and management; 2) Stage I: perioperative care, interstage monitoring, and management strategies; 3) Stage II: surgeries; 4) Stage III: Fontan surgery; and 5) long-term follow-up...
January 3, 2012: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Tal Geva, Jose D Martins, Rachel M Wald
Atrial septal defects are the third most common type of congenital heart disease. Included in this group of malformations are several types of atrial communications that allow shunting of blood between the systemic and the pulmonary circulations. Most children with isolated atrial septal defects are free of symptoms, but the rates of exercise intolerance, atrial tachyarrhythmias, right ventricular dysfunction, and pulmonary hypertension increase with advancing age and life expectancy is reduced in adults with untreated defects...
May 31, 2014: Lancet
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