Read by QxMD icon Read


shared collection
47 papers 0 to 25 followers
Roland Hetzer, Friedrich Kaufmann MEng, Evgenij Potapov, Thomas Krabatsch, Eva Maria Delmo Walter
This article reports our 15-year single-center experience with rotary blood pumps (RBPs) as long-term mechanical circulatory support (MCS) with emphasis on outcomes. For more than 15-year period, we have used various RBPs as bridge to transplantation or to myocardial recovery. Our group performed the first human implantation worldwide of RBCs, the MicroMed DeBakey ventricular assist device in November 1998 in a patient with end-stage heart failure who was supported for 47 days until his death. Based on this initial experience, we recognized the feasibility of providing long-term support and since then it has been our primary armamentarium in treating patients with heart failure...
2016: Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
H Parissis, V Graham, S Lampridis, M Lau, G Hooks, P C Mhandu
Treatment with the intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) is the most common form of mechanical support for the failing heart. Augmentation of diastolic pressure during balloon inflation contributes to the coronary circulation and the presystolic deflation of the balloon reduces the resistance to systolic output. Consequently, the myocardial work is reduced. The overall effect of the IABP therapy is an increase in the myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio and thus in endocardial viability.This is an overall synopsis of what we need to know regarding IABP...
August 4, 2016: Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Toshinobu Kazui, Phat L Tran, Angela Echeverria, Catherine F Jerman, Jessika Iwanski, Samuel S Kim, Richard G Smith, Zain I Khalpey
BACKGROUND: Right ventricular failure is a serious complication after left ventricular assist device placement. CASE PRESENTATION: A 70-year-old male in decompensated heart failure with right ventricular failure after the placement of a left ventricular assist device. A single dual-lumen PROTEKDuo cannula was inserted percutaneously via the internal jugular vein to draw blood from the right atrium and return into the pulmonary artery using the CentriMag system, by passing the failing ventricle...
2016: Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Deepak Acharya, Renzo Y Loyaga-Rendon, Salpy V Pamboukian, José A Tallaj, William L Holman, Ryan S Cantor, David C Naftel, James K Kirklin
BACKGROUND: Patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by acute heart failure or cardiogenic shock have high mortality with conventional management. OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated outcomes of patients with AMI who received durable ventricular assist devices (VAD). METHODS: Patients in the INTERMACS (Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support) registry who underwent VAD placement in the setting of AMI were included and compared with patients who received VAD for non-AMI indications...
April 26, 2016: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Jamshid H Karimov, Gengo Sunagawa, David Horvath, Kiyotaka Fukamachi, Randall C Starling, Nader Moazami
Failure of the right ventricle represents a significant clinical problem and may have different causes, with rates varying between 5% and 50% in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). However, treatment options and device development for right ventricular failure (RVF) have significantly lagged behind those for LVADs. Newer technologies designed or adapted for RV support are needed to provide adequate long-term circulatory support. In this review, we discuss (1) the significance of RVF and its physiologic implications, (2) device constraints affecting treatment options for RVF, and (3) implantable VADs potentially available for RV support...
August 2016: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Gerald Heatley, Poornima Sood, Daniel Goldstein, Nir Uriel, Joseph Cleveland, Don Middlebrook, Mandeep R Mehra
The HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist system (LVAS; St. Jude Medical, Inc., formerly Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) was recently introduced into clinical trials for durable circulatory support in patients with medically refractory advanced-stage heart failure. This centrifugal, fully magnetically levitated, continuous-flow pump is engineered with the intent to enhance hemocompatibility and reduce shear stress on blood elements, while also possessing intrinsic pulsatility. Although bridge-to-transplant (BTT) and destination therapy (DT) are established dichotomous indications for durable left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support, clinical practice has challenged the appropriateness of these designations...
April 2016: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Brian A Houston, Rohan J Kalathiya, Steven Hsu, Rahul Loungani, Mary E Davis, Samuel T Coffin, Nicholas Haglund, Simon Maltais, Mary E Keebler, Peter J Leary, Daniel P Judge, Gerin R Stevens, John Rickard, Chris M Sciortino, Glenn J Whitman, Ashish S Shah, Stuart D Russell, Ryan J Tedford
BACKGROUND: Right ventricular (RV) failure is a source of morbidity and mortality after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. In this study we sought to define hemodynamic changes in afterload and RV adaptation to afterload both early after implantation and with prolonged LVAD support. METHODS: We reviewed right heart catheterization (RHC) data from participants who underwent continuous-flow LVAD implantation at our institutions (n = 244), excluding those on inotropic or vasopressor agents, pulmonary vasodilators or additional mechanical support at any RHC assessment...
July 2016: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Spencer D Lalonde, Ana C Alba, Alanna Rigobon, Heather J Ross, Diego H Delgado, Filio Billia, Michael McDonald, Robert J Cusimano, Terrence M Yau, Vivek Rao
BACKGROUND: The HeartWare ventricular assist device (HVAD) is a new generation centrifugal flow VAD recently introduced in Canada. The objective of this study was to compare the HVAD device to the HeartMate II (HMII) axial flow device. Very few studies have compared clinical outcomes between newer generation VADs. METHODS: All perioperative and follow-up data on LVAD recipients were collected prospectively in our institutional database. Between January 2006 and April 2012, 46 consecutive patients underwent implantation of either an HVAD (n=13) or a HMII (n=33) device...
September 2013: Journal of Cardiac Surgery
Ruth Pulikottil-Jacob, Gaurav Suri, Martin Connock, Ngianga-Bakwin Kandala, Paul Sutcliffe, Hendramoorthy Maheswaran, Nicholas R Banner, Aileen Clarke
BACKGROUND: Patients with advanced heart failure may receive a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) as part of a bridge-to-transplant (BTT) strategy. The United Kingdom National Health Service (UK NHS) has financed a BTT program in which the predominant LVADs used have been the HeartMate II (HM II; Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA) and HeartWare (HW; HeartWare International, Inc. Framingham, MA). We aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of the use of these within the NHS program. METHODS: Individual patient data from the UK NHS Blood and Transplant Data Base were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier and competing outcomes methodologies...
April 2014: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Ingvild Birschmann, Marcus Dittrich, Thomas Eller, Bettina Wiegmann, Armin J Reininger, Ulrich Budde, Martin Strüber
BACKGROUND: Thromboembolic and bleeding events in patients with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are still a major cause of complications. Therefore, the balance between anti-coagulant and pro-coagulant factors needs to be tightly controlled. The principle hypothesis of this study is that different pump designs may have an effect on hemolysis and activation of the coagulation system. Referring to this, the HeartMate II (HMII; Thoratec Corp, Pleasanton, CA) and the HeartWare HVAD (HeartWare International Inc, Framingham, MA) were investigated...
January 2014: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Samer S Najjar, Mark S Slaughter, Francis D Pagani, Randall C Starling, Edwin C McGee, Peter Eckman, Antone J Tatooles, Nader Moazami, Robert L Kormos, David R Hathaway, Kevin B Najarian, Geetha Bhat, Keith D Aaronson, Steven W Boyce
BACKGROUND: The HeartWare left ventricular assist device (HVAD, HeartWare Inc, Framingham, MA) is the first implantable centrifugal continuous-flow pump approved for use as a bridge to transplantation. An infrequent but serious adverse event of LVAD support is thrombus ingestion or formation in the pump. In this study, we analyze the incidence of pump thrombus, evaluate the comparative effectiveness of various treatment strategies, and examine factors pre-disposing to the development of pump thrombus...
January 2014: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
John M Stulak, Shannon M Dunlay, Shashank Sharma, Nicholas A Haglund, Mary Beth Davis, Jennifer Cowger, Palak Shah, Faraz Masood, Keith D Aaronson, Francis D Pagani, Simon Maltais
BACKGROUND: Pump thrombosis is a major adverse event in patients supported with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Treatment approaches include device exchange, lytic therapy, or augmentation of anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy. The optimal strategy in the HeartWare HVAD Ventricular Assist System (HeartWare, Framingham, MA) is uncertain, and because few large studies have examined differing treatment outcomes, we have reviewed findings from the Mechanical Circulatory Support Research Network registry...
December 2015: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Kavitha Muthiah, David Connor, Ken Ly, Elizabeth E Gardiner, Robert K Andrews, Jianlin Qiao, Darren Rutgers, Desiree Robson, Joyce Low, Susan Jarvis, Peter Macdonald, Kumud Dhital, Paul Jansz, Joanne Joseph, Christopher S Hayward
BACKGROUND: Bleeding and thromboembolic events are identified complications in patients supported with newer centrifugal continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cfLVADs). Bleeding events have been associated with acquired von Willebrand syndrome (vWS) in these patients, though longitudinal changes and the effect of pulsatility remain unquantified. We evaluated longitudinal effects of third-generation cfLVADs on hemostatic biomarkers, non-surgical bleeding, and thromboembolic events...
June 2016: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Avishay Grupper, Soon J Park, Naveen L Pereira, Sarah D Schettle, Yariv Gerber, Yan Topilsky, Brooks S Edwards, Richard C Daly, John M Stulak, Lyle D Joyce, Sudhir S Kushwaha
BACKGROUND: Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) patients have poor prognosis due to progressive heart failure characterized by impaired ventricular filling of either or both ventricles. The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcome of end-stage RCM patients after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation and to determine factors that may be associated with improved survival. METHODS: This investigation is a retrospective study of prospectively collected data that include 28 consecutive patients with end-stage RCM who received continuous-flow LVADs at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota...
August 2015: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Areo Saffarzadeh, Pramod Bonde
Temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) refers to a group of devices generally used for less than 30 days to maintain adequate organ perfusion by compensating for a failure of the pumping mechanism of the heart. The increased availability and rapid adoption of new temporary MCS strategies necessitate physicians to become familiar with devices placed both percutaneously and via median sternotomy. This review will examine the different options for commonly used temporary MCS devices including intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs), veno-arterial-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO), TandemHeart(®) (CardiacAssist, Pittsburg, PA, USA) Impella(®) and BVS 5000(®) (both Abiomed Inc...
December 2015: Journal of Thoracic Disease
Daniel Kretzschmar, Alexander Lauten, Markus W Ferrari
PURPOSE: Acute right ventricular failure is a life-threatening condition with poor prognosis. It occurs as a result of right ventricular infarction, postcardiac transplantation, or postimplantation of a left ventricular assist device. Temporary mechanical right ventricular support could be a reasonable treatment option. Therefore, we developed a novel percutaneously implantable device. METHODS: The PERKAT device consists of a self-expandable chamber covered with multiple inflow valves carrying foils...
October 2015: International Journal of Artificial Organs
Sharven Taghavi, Senthil N Jayarajan, Eugene Komaroff, Abeel A Mangi
BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, how the need for a right ventricular assist device (RVAD) with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) affects outcomes after orthotopic heart transplantation has not been studied in a multi-institutional database. METHODS: The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database was queried for all adult orthotopic heart transplantations from the period 2005-2012. Patients requiring a RVAD + LVAD as a bridge to transplant were compared with patients requiring a LVAD only and patients requiring no ventricular assist device (VAD)...
February 2016: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Neeraj Shah, Vratika Agarwal, Nileshkumar Patel, Abhishek Deshmukh, Ankit Chothani, Jalaj Garg, Apurva Badheka, Matthew Martinez, Nauman Islam, Ronald Freudenberger
BACKGROUND: Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have shown survival benefit in end-stage heart failure patients. LVAD technology has evolved considerably with the development of continuous-flow devices. METHODS: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried from 2005 to 2011 using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition procedure code 37.66, Insertion of Implantable Heart System, in any procedure field. Patients with primary diagnosis of orthotopic heart transplant or use of temporary mechanical circulatory support devices were excluded...
April 2016: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Ann C Gaffey, Pavan Atluri
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2015: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
James K Kirklin, David C Naftel, Francis D Pagani, Robert L Kormos, Lynne W Stevenson, Elizabeth D Blume, Susan L Myers, Marissa A Miller, J Timothy Baldwin, James B Young
The seventh annual report of the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) summarizes the first 9 years of patient enrollment. The Registry includes >15,000 patients from 158 participating hospitals. Trends in device strategy, patient profile at implant and survival are presented. Risk factors for mortality with continuous-flow pumps are updated, and the major causes/modes of death are presented. The adverse event burden is compared between eras, and health-related quality of life is reviewed...
December 2015: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
2015-11-19 05:46:53
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"