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Sleep disorders

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9 papers 25 to 100 followers
By Abraham Nunes Psychiatry resident interested in computational neuroscience, forensic psychiatry, and neuropsychiatry.
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27647645/insomnia-parasomnias-and-narcolepsy-in-children-clinical-features-diagnosis-and-management
#1
REVIEW
Kiran Maski, Judith A Owens
Sleep problems are frequently encountered as presenting complaints in child neurology clinical practice. They can affect the functioning and quality of life of children, particularly those with primary neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders, since coexisting sleep problems can add substantially to neurocognitive and behavioural comorbidities. Additionally, symptoms of some sleep disorders such as parasomnias and narcolepsy can be confused with those of other neurological disorders (eg, epilepsy), posing diagnostic challenges for paediatric neurologists...
October 2016: Lancet Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26716917/narcolepsy
#2
REVIEW
Thomas E Scammell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 31, 2015: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26101458/behavioural-and-cognitive-behavioural-treatments-of-parasomnias
#3
REVIEW
Andrea Galbiati, Fabrizio Rinaldi, Enrico Giora, Luigi Ferini-Strambi, Sara Marelli
Parasomnias are unpleasant or undesirable behaviours or experiences that occur predominantly during or within close proximity to sleep. Pharmacological treatments of parasomnias are available, but their efficacy is established only for few disorders. Furthermore, most of these disorders tend spontaneously to remit with development. Nonpharmacological treatments therefore represent valid therapeutic choices. This paper reviews behavioural and cognitive-behavioural managements employed for parasomnias. Referring to the ICSD-3 nosology we consider, respectively, NREM parasomnias, REM parasomnias, and other parasomnias...
2015: Behavioural Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26100750/interactions-of-the-histamine-and-hypocretin-systems-in-cns-disorders
#4
REVIEW
Ling Shan, Yves Dauvilliers, Jerome M Siegel
Histamine and hypocretin neurons are localized to the hypothalamus, a brain area critical to autonomic function and sleep. Narcolepsy type 1, also known as narcolepsy with cataplexy, is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, impaired night-time sleep, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and short latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep after sleep onset. In narcolepsy, 90% of hypocretin neurons are lost; in addition, two groups reported in 2014 that the number of histamine neurons is increased by 64% or more in human patients with narcolepsy, suggesting involvement of histamine in the aetiology of this disorder...
July 2015: Nature Reviews. Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25698339/sleep-disturbances-as-an-evidence-based-suicide-risk-factor
#5
REVIEW
Rebecca A Bernert, Joanne S Kim, Naomi G Iwata, Michael L Perlis
Increasing research indicates that sleep disturbances may confer increased risk for suicidal behaviors, including suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and death by suicide. Despite increased investigation, a number of methodological problems present important limitations to the validity and generalizability of findings in this area, which warrant additional focus. To evaluate and delineate sleep disturbances as an evidence-based suicide risk factor, a systematic review of the extant literature was conducted with methodological considerations as a central focus...
March 2015: Current Psychiatry Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24701532/etiopathogenesis-and-neurobiology-of-narcolepsy-a-review
#6
REVIEW
Swarup Kumar, Haritha Sagili
Narcolepsy is a chronic lifelong sleep disorder and it often leaves a debilitating effect on the quality of life of the sufferer. This disorder is characterized by a tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (brief loss of muscle tone following strong emotion), hypnogogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. There are two distinct subgroups of Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy with cataplexy and Narcolepsy without cataplexy. For over 100 years, clinicians have recognised narcolepsy, but only in the last few decades have scientists been able to shed light on the true cause and pathogenesis of narcolepsy...
February 2014: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19742406/the-neurobiology-of-sleep
#7
REVIEW
Jerome M Siegel
The neurobiology of sleep and narcolepsy is reviewed. Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is generated by neurons in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus and adjacent basal forebrain. Lesions in these regions cause insomnia. Stimulation of these regions rapidly produces sleep onset. The key brain structure for generating REM sleep is the pons and adjacent portions of the midbrain. Damage to the pons and/or caudal midbrain can cause abnormalities in REM sleep. The persistent sleepiness of narcolepsy is a result of a loss of hypocretin function...
September 2009: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24445664/autoimmunity-a-new-clue-to-sleepiness
#8
COMMENT
Elisabeth Kugelberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2014: Nature Reviews. Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23385692/the-neurobiology-of-sleep
#9
REVIEW
Clifford B Saper
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The basic circuitries that regulate wake-sleep cycles are described, along with how these are affected by different disease states and how those alterations lead to the clinical manifestations of those disorders. RECENT FINDINGS: The discovery of both sleep-promoting neurons in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus and wake-promoting neurons, such as the lateral hypothalamic orexin (also called hypocretin) neurons, has allowed us to recognize that these two populations of neurons are mutually antagonistic (ie, inhibit each other) and form a "flip-flop switch," a type of circuit that results in rapid and complete transition in behavioral state...
February 2013: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
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