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Percutaneous Peripheral nerve stimulation and neurologic disorders

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251 papers 25 to 100 followers Use of Percutaneous Peripheral nerve and motor point stimulation to modulate the neuroplastic changes ocurred in the peripheral and central nervous Systems in cronic and acute pain patients
By Hugo Silva Pinto Sports medicine MD, neuromuscular pain and dysfunctions private practice
Shehzad Khalid, Joe Iwanaga, Marios Loukas, R Shane Tubbs
Leg pain from lumbar disc herniation is a common presentation. However, certain muscular and peripheral nerve variants may present similarly and represent an unrecognized etiology of femoral nerve dysfunction. Such cases might affect the outcome of specific treatment regimes. Therefore, recognition of these variations in anatomy may be useful to the clinician when treating the patient with medically refractory lower limb pain. Some reports have reported variant slips of the psoas and iliacus muscles, which may split the femoral nerve causing a potential risk for nerve entrapment...
August 9, 2017: Curēus
Veronika Vielsmeier, Martin Schecklmann, Winfried Schlee, Peter M Kreuzer, Timm B Poeppl, Rainer Rupprecht, Berthold Langguth, Astrid Lehner
While brain stimulation techniques have been examined as treatment options for chronic tinnitus for many years, they have recently been extended to multimodal treatment approaches. As chronic tinnitus is often accompanied by comorbid muscular tension in the neck and back, we performed a one-arm pilot study to explore the feasibility of a new multimodal treatment approach. In detail, repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rPMS) of the back was performed before and after each session of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the brain...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Jan Tode, Irina Kirillova-Woytke, Vanessa H Rausch, Ralf Baron, Wilfrid Jänig
Chronic injury of limb nerves leading to neuropathic pain affects deep somatic nerves. Here the functional properties of injured afferent fibers in the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus nerve were investigated 20 days and 80 days after suturing the central stump of this muscle nerve to the distal stump of the sural nerve in anesthetized rats. Neurophysiological recordings were made from afferent axons identified in either the sciatic nerve (87 A-, 63 C-fibers) or the dorsal root L4/L5 (52 A-, 26 C-fibers) by electrical stimulation of the injured nerve...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Neurophysiology
Jan Vollert, Walter Magerl, Ralf Baron, Andreas Binder, Elena K Enax-Krumova, Gerd Geisslinger, Janne Gierthmühlen, Florian Henrich, Philipp Hüllemann, Thomas Klein, Jörn Lötsch, Christoph Maier, Bruno Oertel, Sigrid Schuh-Hofer, Thomas R Tölle, Rolf-Detlef Treede
As an indirect approach to relate previously identified sensory phenotypes of patients suffering from peripheral neuropathic pain to underlying mechanisms, we used a published sorting algorithm to estimate the prevalence of denervation, peripheral and central sensitization in 657 healthy subjects undergoing experimental models of nerve block (compression block, topical lidocaine), primary (sunburn, topical capsaicin), or secondary hyperalgesia (intradermal capsaicin, electrical high-frequency stimulation), and in 902 patients suffering from neuropathic pain...
February 24, 2018: Pain
Megumi Sumizono, Harutoshi Sakakima, Shotaro Otsuka, Takuto Terashi, Kazuki Nakanishi, Koki Ueda, Seiya Takada, Kiyoshi Kikuchi
Background: Exercise regimens are established methods that can relieve neuropathic pain. However, the relationship between frequency and intensity of exercise and multiple cellular responses of exercise-induced alleviation of neuropathic pain is still unclear. We examined the influence of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and the intracellular responses in a sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Materials and methods: Rats were assigned to four groups as follows: CCI and high-frequency exercise (HFE group), CCI and low-frequency exercise (LFE group), CCI and no exercise (No-Ex group), and naive animals (control group)...
2018: Journal of Pain Research
Naileshni Singh, Alison A Nielsen, David J Copenhaver, Samir J Sheth, Chin-Shang Li, Scott M Fishman
Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recently implemented milestones and competencies as a framework for training fellows in Pain Medicine, but individual programs are left to create educational platforms and assessment tools that meet ACGME standards. Objectives: In this article, we discuss the concept of milestone-based competencies and the inherent challenges for implementation in pain medicine. We consider simulation-based education (SBE) as a potential tool for the field to meet ACGME goals through advancing novel learning opportunities, engaging in clinically relevant scenarios, and mastering technical and nontechnical skills...
February 27, 2018: Pain Medicine: the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pain Medicine
Olivia C Eller-Smith, Andrea L Nicol, Julie A Christianson
Centralized pain syndromes are associated with changes within the central nervous system that amplify peripheral input and/or generate the perception of pain in the absence of a noxious stimulus. Examples of idiopathic functional disorders that are often categorized as centralized pain syndromes include fibromyalgia, chronic pelvic pain syndromes, migraine, and temporomandibular disorder. Patients often suffer from widespread pain, associated with more than one specific syndrome, and report fatigue, mood and sleep disturbances, and poor quality of life...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Shehzad Khalid, R Shane Tubbs
We have reviewed here the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological literature of the human brain and have proposed the various pain mechanisms that we currently know of. Essentially when tissue is damaged, peripheral nociceptors are activated continuously and prostanoids are hence produced. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and medications aim to target these prostanoids to treat the inflammatory component of pain. Normal pain tends to have a protective response. It is important for the nervous system to learn and recognize this painful stimulus earlier and quicker with repeated exposure to avoid tissue damage...
October 6, 2017: Curēus
Claudia Sommer, Mathias Leinders, Nurcan Üçeyler
Peripheral nerve injuries and diseases often lead to pain persisting beyond the resolution of damage, indicating an active disease-promoting process, which may result in chronic pain. This is regarded as a maladaptive mechanism resulting from neuroinflammation that originally serves to promote regeneration and healing. Knowledge on these physiological and pathophysiological processes has accumulated over the last few decades and has started to yield potential therapeutic targets. Key players are macrophages, T-lymphocytes, cytokines, and chemokines...
March 2018: Pain
Ozden Kilinc, Savas Sencan, Tulay Ercalik, Pinar Kahraman Koytak, Hande Alibas, Osman Hakan Gunduz, Tulin Tanridag, Kayihan Uluc
INTRODUCTION: An increased response to painful stimuli without spontaneous pain suggests a role of central hyperexcitability of pain pathways in the pathogenesis of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). In this study we aimed to test the hypothesis that spinal pain pathways are affected in MPS. We used cutaneous silent period (CSP) parameters to demonstrate the hyperexcitability of spinal pain pathways in MPS. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with MPS and 30 healthy volunteers were included in the study...
January 2018: Muscle & Nerve
Henrik Bjarke Vaegter, Daniel Bandholtz Dørge, Kristian Sonne Schmidt, Anders Haagen Jensen, Thomas Graven-Nielsen
Objective: Exercise increases pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in exercising and nonexercising muscles, known as exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). No studies have investigated the test-retest reliability of change in PPTs after aerobic exercise. Primary objectives were to compare the effect on PPTs after an incremental bicycling exercise compared with quiet rest and to investigate the relative and absolute test-retest reliability of the test stimulus (PPT) and the absolute and relative EIH response in exercising and nonexercising muscles...
February 7, 2018: Pain Medicine: the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pain Medicine
Dylan J H A Henssen, Erkan Kurt, Anne-Marie van Cappellen van Walsum, Inge Arnts, Jonne Doorduin, Tamas Kozicz, Robert van Dongen, Ronald H M A Bartels
BACKGROUND: Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was introduced as a last-resort treatment for chronic neuropathic pain. Over the years, MCS has been used for the treatment of various pain syndromes but long-term follow-up is unknown. METHODS: This paper reports the results of MCS from 2005 until 2012 with a 3-year follow-up. Patients who suffered from chronic neuropathic pain treated with MCS were studied. The analgesic effect was determined as successful by decrease in pain-intensity on the visual analog scale (VAS) of at least 40%...
2018: PloS One
Francisco Alburquerque-Sendín, Pascal Madeleine, César Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Paula Rezende Camargo, Tania Fátima Salvini
Mechanical hyperalgesia defined as decreased pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) is commonly associated with pain. In this narrative review, we report the current state of the art within topographical pressure sensitivity maps. Such maps are based on multiple PPT assessments. The PPTs are assessed by an a priori defined grid with special focus on both spatial and temporal summation issues. The grid covers the muscle or the body region of interest using absolute or relative values determined from anatomical landmarks or anthropometric values...
2018: Journal of Pain Research
Moritz Nöbel, Stephan Feistel, Jens Ellrich, Karl Messlinger
BACKGROUND: Tension-type headache and other primary headaches may be triggered or aggravated by disorders of pericranial muscles, which is possibly due to convergent or collateral afferent input from meningeal and muscular receptive areas. In rodent models high extracellular concentrations of ATP caused muscle nociception and central sensitization of second order neurons. In a rat model of meningeal nociception we asked if spinal trigeminal activity induced by ATP can be modulated by local anaesthesia of distinct muscles...
December 2016: Journal of Headache and Pain
Gyu-Sik Choi, Sang Gyu Kwak, Han Do Lee, Min Cheol Chang
OBJECTIVE: Central pain can occur following traumatic brain injury, leading to poor functional recovery, limitation of activities of daily living, and decreased quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine whether high-frequency (10 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, applied over the primary motor cortex of the affected hemisphere, can be used to manage chronic central pain after mild traumatic brain injury. DESIGN: Prospective randomized feasibility study...
January 31, 2018: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Alexander V Chervyakov, Alexandra G Poydasheva, Roman H Lyukmanov, Natalia A Suponeva, Ludmila A Chernikova, Michael A Piradov, Ksenia I Ustinova
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to test the effects of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, delivered in different modes, on motor impairments and functional limitations after stroke. METHODS: The study sample included 42 patients (58.5 ± 10.7 years; 26 males) who experienced a single unilateral stroke (1-12 months previously) in the area of the middle cerebral artery. Patients completed a course of conventional rehabilitation, together with 10 sessions of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or sham stimulation...
January 31, 2018: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society
Brian Hainline, Wayne Derman, Alan Vernec, Richard Budgett, Masataka Deie, Jiří Dvořák, Chris Harle, Stanley A Herring, Mike McNamee, Willem Meeuwisse, G Lorimer Moseley, Bade Omololu, John Orchard, Andrew Pipe, Babette M Pluim, Johan Ræder, Christian Siebert, Mike Stewart, Mark Stuart, Judith A Turner, Mark Ware, David Zideman, Lars Engebretsen
Pain is a common problem among elite athletes and is frequently associated with sport injury. Both pain and injury interfere with the performance of elite athletes. There are currently no evidence-based or consensus-based guidelines for the management of pain in elite athletes. Typically, pain management consists of the provision of analgesics, rest and physical therapy. More appropriately, a treatment strategy should address all contributors to pain including underlying pathophysiology, biomechanical abnormalities and psychosocial issues, and should employ therapies providing optimal benefit and minimal harm...
September 2017: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Beniamina Mercante, Franca Deriu, Claire-Marie Rangon
Neuromodulation, thanks to intrinsic and extrinsic brain feedback loops, seems to be the best way to exploit brain plasticity for therapeutic purposes. In the past years, there has been tremendous advances in the field of non-pharmacological modulation of brain activity. This review of different neurostimulation techniques will focus on sites and mechanisms of both transcutaneous vagus and trigeminal nerve stimulation. These methods are scientifically validated non-invasive bottom-up brain modulation techniques, easily implemented from the outer ear...
January 21, 2018: Medicines (Basel, Switzerland)
S L Dischiavi, A A Wright, E J Hegedus, C M Bleakley
Human movement is a complex orchestration of events involving many different body systems. Understanding how these systems interact during musculoskeletal movements can directly inform a variety of research fields including: injury etiology, injury prevention and therapeutic exercise prescription. Traditionally scientists have examined human movement through a reductionist lens whereby movements are broken down and observed in isolation. The process of reductionism fails to capture the interconnected complexities and the dynamic interactions found within complex systems such as human movement...
January 2018: Medical Hypotheses
Marcella Ferraz Pazzinatto, Danilo de Oliveira Silva, Evangelos Pappas, Fernando Henrique Magalhães, Fábio Mícolis de Azevedo
Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is one of the most common conditions in orthopedic practice while recent evidence has suggested that it may be a predisposing factor to patellofemoral osteoarthritis. In addition to biomechanical alterations associated with the pathomechanisms underlying PFP, the investigation of neurophysiological alterations has provided novel information in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PFP. For instance, women with PFP present lower amplitude of the vastus medialis (VM) H-reflexes compared to pain-free controls, which suggests that the excitability of spinal reflexes might be a promising tool for discriminating woman with PFP in clinical practice...
October 2017: Medical Hypotheses
2018-01-30 01:20:45
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