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CTE

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112 papers 25 to 100 followers
By David Rhine MD FRCPC. Emergency medicine. Special interest in concussion management.
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298054/long-term-effects-of-adolescent-sport-concussion-across-the-age-spectrum
#1
Douglas N Martini, James T Eckner, Sean K Meehan, Steven P Broglio
BACKGROUND: Research in sport concussion has increased greatly over the previous decade due to increased scientific interest as well as the media and political spotlight that has been cast on this injury. However, a dearth of literature is available regarding the long-term (>1 year after concussion) effects of adolescent concussion on cognitive and motor performance of high school athletes. PURPOSE: To evaluate the potential for long-term effects of concussion sustained during high school on cognitive and motor performance across the lifespan...
February 1, 2017: American Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28254594/the-current-status-of-research-on-chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy
#2
REVIEW
Kenneth Perrine, Jacqueline Helcer, Apostolos John Tsiouris, David J Pisapia, Philip Stieg
Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) evolved from the term "dementia pugilistica" describing the dementia found in many boxers to its current use in describing the dementia and depression sometimes found in athletes subjected to multiple concussions or sub-concussive blows to the head. Concurrently, the neuropathology evolved to specify a unique type of tauopathy found in perivascular spaces at the depth of sulci and other features not typically seen in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Four stages of CTE have been proposed, with four corresponding clinical syndromes of Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome...
February 27, 2017: World Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28205009/mixed-pathologies-including-chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy-account-for-dementia-in-retired-association-football-soccer-players
#3
Helen Ling, Huw R Morris, James W Neal, Andrew J Lees, John Hardy, Janice L Holton, Tamas Revesz, David D R Williams
In retired professional association football (soccer) players with a past history of repetitive head impacts, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a potential neurodegenerative cause of dementia and motor impairments. From 1980 to 2010, 14 retired footballers with dementia were followed up regularly until death. Their clinical data, playing career, and concussion history were prospectively collected. Next-of-kin provided consent for six to have post-mortem brain examination. Of the 14 male participants, 13 were professional and 1 was a committed amateur...
March 2017: Acta Neuropathologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28144218/changes-in-cortical-plasticity-in-relation-to-a-history-of-concussion-during-adolescence
#4
Sean K Meehan, Jasmine L Mirdamadi, Douglas N Martini, Steven P Broglio
Adolescence and early adulthood is a critical period for neurophysiological development potentially characterized by an increased susceptibility to the long-term effects of traumatic brain injury. The current study investigated differences in motor cortical physiology and neuroplastic potential across a cohort of young adults with adolescent concussion history and those without. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) before and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS)...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28096246/chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy-is-latency-in-symptom-onset-explained-by-tau-propagation
#5
Joshua Kriegel, Zachary Papadopoulos, Ann C McKee
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy associated with repetitive mild brain trauma. CTE, previously termed "dementia pugilistica," has been identified in American football, ice hockey, baseball, rugby and soccer players, boxers, wrestlers, and military personnel exposed to blast and other traumatic brain injuries. There is often a long latency period between an individual's exposure to repetitive brain trauma and the clinical symptoms of CTE. The pathology of CTE is characterized by a progression from isolated focal perivascular hyperphosphorylated tau lesions in the cerebral cortex to a widespread tauopathy that involves diffuse cortical and medial temporal lobe regions...
January 17, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077006/longitudinal-assessment-of-health-related-quality-of-life-following-adolescent-sports-related-concussion
#6
Kelly Russell, Erin Selci, Stephanie Chu, Samuel Fineblit, Lesley Ritchie, Michael J Ellis
To examine initial and longitudinal health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescent sports-related concussion (SRC) patients, a prospective observational case-series study was conducted among adolescent SRC patients who were evaluated at a multi-disciplinary pediatric concussion program. Health-related quality of life was measured using the child self-report Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) generic score scale (age 13-18 version) and the PedsQL Cognitive Functioning scale. Initial and longitudinal HRQOL outcomes were compared between patients who did and did not develop post-concussion syndrome (PCS)...
March 1, 2017: Journal of Neurotrauma
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28067738/does-a-unique-neuropsychiatric-profile-currently-exist-for-chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy
#7
REVIEW
Faith M Hanlon, Christopher A McGrew, Andrew R Mayer
There is evidence that repetitive mild traumatic brain injury leads to specific patterns of neuropathological findings, labeled chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). However, questions remain about whether these neuropathological changes produce changes in behavior, cognition, and emotional status that are associated with a unique neuropsychiatric profile that can be assessed using currently available clinical tools. Our review of the literature indicates that insufficient evidence currently exists to suggest a distinct neuropsychiatric profile for CTE...
January 2017: Current Sports Medicine Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27979411/high-school-football-and-late-life-risk-of-neurodegenerative-syndromes-1956-1970
#8
Pieter H H Janssen, Jay Mandrekar, Michelle M Mielke, J Eric Ahlskog, Bradley F Boeve, Keith Josephs, Rodolfo Savica
OBJECTIVE: To assess whether athletes who played American varsity high school football between 1956 and 1970 have an increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases later in life. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified all male varsity football players between 1956 and 1970 in the public high schools of Rochester, Minnesota, and non-football-playing male varsity swimmers, wrestlers, and basketball players. Using the medical records linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, we ascertained the incidence of late-life neurodegenerative diseases: dementia, parkinsonism, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis...
January 2017: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906973/detecting-mild-traumatic-brain-injury-using-resting-state-magnetoencephalographic-connectivity
#9
Vasily A Vakorin, Sam M Doesburg, Leodante da Costa, Rakesh Jetly, Elizabeth W Pang, Margot J Taylor
Accurate means to detect mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using objective and quantitative measures remain elusive. Conventional imaging typically detects no abnormalities despite post-concussive symptoms. In the present study, we recorded resting state magnetoencephalograms (MEG) from adults with mTBI and controls. Atlas-guided reconstruction of resting state activity was performed for 90 cortical and subcortical regions, and calculation of inter-regional oscillatory phase synchrony at various frequencies was performed...
December 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886529/autobiographical-and-episodic-memory-deficits-in-mild-traumatic-brain-injury
#10
Jeffrey D Wammes, Tyler J Good, Myra A Fernandes
Those who have suffered a concussion, otherwise known as a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), often complain of lingering memory problems. However, there is little evidence in the behavioral literature reliably demonstrating memory deficits. Thus, in the present study, cognitive profiles including measures of general executive functioning and processing speed, as well as episodic and semantic memory were collected in younger and older adult participants with or without a remote (>1year prior to testing) mTBI...
February 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27867100/the-independent-influence-of-concussive-and-sub-concussive-impacts-on-soccer-players-neurophysiological-and-neuropsychological-function
#11
R Davis Moore, Julien Lepine, Dave Ellemberg
Accumulating research demonstrates that repetitive sub-concussive impacts can alter the structure, function and connectivity of the brain. However, the functional significance of these alterations as well as the independent contribution of concussive and sub-concussive impacts to neurophysiological and neuropsychological health are unclear. Accordingly, we compared the neurophysiological and neuropsychological function of contact athletes with (concussion group) and without (sub-concussion group) a history of concussion, to non-contact athletes...
February 2017: International Journal of Psychophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27843436/lifetime-multiple-mild-traumatic-brain-injuries-are-associated-with-cognitive-and-mood-symptoms-in-young-healthy-college-students
#12
Kyle C Vynorius, Alyssa M Paquin, Daniel R Seichepine
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI, also known as concussion) has been associated with a range of long-term mood and cognitive deficits, including executive dysfunction. Previous research in athletes suggests that cognitive and mood problems are associated with a history of repetitive mTBI. However, to date, no studies have examined the impact of a lifetime accumulation of repetitive mTBIs on cognition, particularly executive functioning, and mood in a sample of young adults who were not athletes...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27829969/chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy-in-athletes-involved-with-high-impact-sports
#13
Cyrus Safinia, Eric M Bershad, H Brent Clark, Karen SantaCruz, Naila Alakbarova, Jose I Suarez, Afshin A Divani
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease occurring most commonly in athletes and is caused by repeated concussive or subconcussive blows to the head. The main purpose of this review is to evaluate the published literature on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in athletes participating in high-impact sports. In particular, we highlight the significance of concussive and subconcussive impacts in multiple sports, elucidate the differences between clinical/pathological features of CTE and related neurodegenerative diseases, and provide an explanation for the variation in clinical presentation between athletes of different sports...
October 2016: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27815240/persistent-effects-of-playing-football-and-associated-subconcussive-head-trauma-on-brain-structure-and-function-a-systematic-review-of-the-literature
#14
REVIEW
A A Tarnutzer, D Straumann, P Brugger, N Feddermann-Demont
AIM/OBJECTIVE: There is ongoing controversy about persistent neurological deficits in active and former football (soccer) players. We reviewed the literature for associations between football activities (including heading/head injuries) and decline in brain structure/function. DESIGN: Systematic literature review. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane-CRCT, SportDiscus, Cochrane-DSR=4 (accessed 2 August 2016). ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING STUDIES: Original studies reporting on football-related persistent effects on brain structure/function...
November 4, 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27686843/does-neuroinflammation-drive-the-relationship-between-tau-hyperphosphorylation-and-dementia-development-following-traumatic-brain-injury
#15
REVIEW
Lyndsey E Collins-Praino, Frances Corrigan
A history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is linked to an increased risk for the later development of dementia. This encompasses a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), with AD linked to history of moderate-severe TBI and CTE to a history of repeated concussion. Of note, both AD and CTE are characterized by the abnormal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, which are thought to play an important role in the development of neurodegeneration...
February 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27654455/cerebrospinal-fluid-biomarkers-in-postconcussion-syndrome-measuring-neuronal-injury-and-distinguishing-individuals-at-risk-for-persistent-postconcussion-syndrome-or-chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy
#16
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27587800/sports-concussion-research-chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy-and-the-media-repairing-the-disconnect
#17
Andrew W Kuhn, Aaron M Yengo-Kahn, Zachary Y Kerr, Scott L Zuckerman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 1, 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27474382/multiple-past-concussions-in-high-school-football-players-are-there-differences-in-cognitive-functioning-and-symptom-reporting
#18
Brian L Brooks, Rebekah Mannix, Bruce Maxwell, Ross Zafonte, Paul D Berkner, Grant L Iverson
BACKGROUND: There is increasing concern about the possible long-term effects of multiple concussions, particularly on the developing adolescent brain. Whether the effect of multiple concussions is detectable in high school football players has not been well studied, although the public health implications are great in this population. PURPOSE: To determine if there are measureable differences in cognitive functioning or symptom reporting in high school football players with a history of multiple concussions...
December 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27432348/the-impact-of-traumatic-brain-injury-on-the-aging-brain
#19
REVIEW
Jacob S Young, Jonathan G Hobbs, Julian E Bailes
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases...
September 2016: Current Psychiatry Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27400367/association-of-traumatic-brain-injury-with-late-life-neurodegenerative-conditions-and-neuropathologic-findings
#20
Paul K Crane, Laura E Gibbons, Kristen Dams-O'Connor, Emily Trittschuh, James B Leverenz, C Dirk Keene, Joshua Sonnen, Thomas J Montine, David A Bennett, Sue Leurgans, Julie A Schneider, Eric B Larson
IMPORTANCE: The late effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are of great interest, but studies characterizing these effects are limited. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) is associated with an increased risk for clinical and neuropathologic findings of Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD), and other dementias. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This study analyzed data from the Religious Orders Study (ROS), Memory and Aging Project (MAP), and Adult Changes in Thought study (ACT)...
September 1, 2016: JAMA Neurology
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