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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30171861/the-septic-heart-current-understanding-of-molecular-mechanisms-and-clinical-implications
#1
REVIEW
Lukas Martin, Matthias Derwall, Sura Al Zoubi, Elisabeth Zechendorf, Daniel A Reuter, Chris Thiemermann, Tobias Schuerholz
Septic cardiomyopathy is a key feature of sepsis-associated cardiovascular failure. Despite the lack of consistent diagnostic criteria, patients typically exhibit ventricular dilatation, reduced ventricular contractility, and/or both right and left ventricular dysfunction with a reduced response to volume infusion. Although there is solid evidence that the presence of septic cardiomyopathy is a relevant contributor to organ dysfunction and an important factor in the already complicated therapeutic management of patients with sepsis, there are still several questions to be asked: Which factors/mechanisms cause a cardiac dysfunction associated with sepsis? How do we diagnose septic cardiomyopathy? How do we treat septic cardiomyopathy? How does septic cardiomyopathy influence the long-term outcome of the patient? Each of these questions is interrelated, and the answers require a profound understanding of the underlying pathophysiology that involves a complex mix of systemic factors and molecular, metabolic, and structural changes of the cardiomyocyte...
August 29, 2018: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29860284/antithrombotic-therapy-for-peripheral-artery-disease-in-2018
#2
REVIEW
Connie N Hess, William R Hiatt
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 12, 2018: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29321520/essential-thrombocythemia-treatment-algorithm-2018
#3
REVIEW
Ayalew Tefferi, Alessandro M Vannucchi, Tiziano Barbui
Current drug therapy for myeloproliferative neoplasms, including essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV), is neither curative nor has it been shown to prolong survival. Fortunately, prognosis in ET and PV is relatively good, with median survivals in younger patients estimated at 33 and 24 years, respectively. Therefore, when it comes to treatment in ET or PV, less is more and one should avoid exposing patients to new drugs that have not been shown to be disease-modifying, and whose long-term consequences are suspect (e...
January 10, 2018: Blood Cancer Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29955859/a-guide-to-utilization-of-the-microbiology-laboratory-for-diagnosis-of-infectious-diseases-2018-update-by-the-infectious-diseases-society-of-america-and-the-american-society-for-microbiology
#4
J Michael Miller, Matthew J Binnicker, Sheldon Campbell, Karen C Carroll, Kimberle C Chapin, Peter H Gilligan, Mark D Gonzalez, Robert C Jerris, Sue C Kehl, Robin Patel, Bobbi S Pritt, Sandra S Richter, Barbara Robinson-Dunn, Joseph D Schwartzman, James W Snyder, Sam Telford, Elitza S Theel, Richard B Thomson, Melvin P Weinstein, Joseph D Yao
The critical nature of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician/advanced practice provider and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the healthcare team. This document, developed by experts in laboratory and adult and pediatric clinical medicine, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions. This document presents a system-based approach rather than specimen-based approach, and includes bloodstream and cardiovascular system infections, central nervous system infections, ocular infections, soft tissue infections of the head and neck, upper and lower respiratory infections, infections of the gastrointestinal tract, intra-abdominal infections, bone and joint infections, urinary tract infections, genital infections, and other skin and soft tissue infections; or into etiologic agent groups, including arthropod-borne infections, viral syndromes, and blood and tissue parasite infections...
August 31, 2018: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29868972/a-global-perspective-on-vasoactive-agents-in-shock
#5
REVIEW
Djillali Annane, Lamia Ouanes-Besbes, Daniel de Backer, Bin DU, Anthony C Gordon, Glenn Hernández, Keith M Olsen, Tiffany M Osborn, Sandra Peake, James A Russell, Sergio Zanotti Cavazzoni
PURPOSE: We set out to summarize the current knowledge on vasoactive drugs and their use in the management of shock to inform physicians' practices. METHODS: This is a narrative review by a multidisciplinary, multinational-from six continents-panel of experts including physicians, a pharmacist, trialists, and scientists. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Vasoactive drugs are an essential part of shock management. Catecholamines are the most commonly used vasoactive agents in the intensive care unit, and among them norepinephrine is the first-line therapy in most clinical conditions...
June 2018: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29880438/identification-management-and-transition-of-care-for-patients-with-opioid-use-disorder-in-the-emergency-department
#6
REVIEW
Herbert C Duber, Isabel A Barata, Eric Cioè-Peña, Stephen Y Liang, Eric Ketcham, Wendy Macias-Konstantopoulos, Shawn A Ryan, Mark Stavros, Lauren K Whiteside
Because of a soaring number of opioid-related deaths during the past decade, opioid use disorder has become a prominent issue in both the scientific literature and lay press. Although most of the focus within the emergency medicine community has been on opioid prescribing-specifically, on reducing the incidence of opioid prescribing and examining alternative pain treatment-interest is heightening in identifying and managing patients with opioid use disorder in an effective and evidence-based manner. In this clinical review article, we examine current strategies for identifying patients with opioid use disorder, the treatment of patients with acute opioid withdrawal syndrome, approaches to medication-assisted therapy, and the transition of patients with opioid use disorder from the emergency department to outpatient services...
October 2018: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29880020/antiepileptic-drugs-in-critically-ill-patients
#7
REVIEW
Salia Farrokh, Pouya Tahsili-Fahadan, Eva K Ritzl, John J Lewin, Marek A Mirski
BACKGROUND: The incidence of seizures in intensive care units ranges from 3.3% to 34%. It is therefore often necessary to initiate or continue anticonvulsant drugs in this setting. When a new anticonvulsant is initiated, drug factors, such as onset of action and side effects, and patient factors, such as age, renal, and hepatic function, should be taken into account. It is important to note that the altered physiology of critically ill patients as well as pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions such as renal replacement therapy, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and target temperature management may lead to therapeutic failure or toxicity...
June 7, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29806188/pediatric-pulmonology-year-in-review-2017-part-3
#8
REVIEW
Clement L Ren, Heather N Muston, Ozge Yilmaz, Terry L Noah
Pediatric Pulmonology publishes original research, reviews, and case reports related to a wide range of children's respiratory disorders. We here summarize the past year's publications in our major topic areas, in the context of selected literature in these areas from other journals relevant to our discipline. This review (Part 3 of a 5-part series) covers selected articles on asthma, physiology/lung function testing, and respiratory infections.
May 27, 2018: Pediatric Pulmonology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221616/dengue-fever-report-from-the-task-force-on-tropical-diseases-by-the-world-federation-of-societies-of-intensive-and-critical-care-medicine
#9
REVIEW
Pravin Amin, Özlem Acicbe, Jorge Hidalgo, Juan Ignacio Silesky Jiménez, Tim Baker, Guy A Richards
Dengue is an arbovirus affecting humans and spread by mosquitoes. Severe dengue follows a secondary infection with a different virus serotype. The problem is truly global as it is endemic in over 100 countries. Severe dengue can be a life-threatening because of increased vascular permeability, resulting in leakage of fluid from the intravascular compartment to the extravascular space. When major bleeding does occur, it is almost invariably combined with profound shock since this, in combination with thrombocytopenia, hypoxia, and acidosis, can lead to multiple organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation...
February 2018: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29937192/sepsis-and-septic-shock
#10
REVIEW
Maurizio Cecconi, Laura Evans, Mitchell Levy, Andrew Rhodes
Sepsis is a common condition that is associated with unacceptably high mortality and, for many of those who survive, long-term morbidity. Increased awareness of the condition resulting from ongoing campaigns and the evidence arising from research in the past 10 years have increased understanding of this problem among clinicians and lay people, and have led to improved outcomes. The World Health Assembly and WHO made sepsis a global health priority in 2017 and have adopted a resolution to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and management of sepsis...
July 7, 2018: Lancet
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29946498/rapid-sequence-intubation-in-traumatic-brain-injured-adults
#11
REVIEW
Nicholas Kramer, David Lebowitz, Michael Walsh, Latha Ganti
Deciding on proper medication administration for the traumatic brain injury (TBI) patient undergoing intubation can be daunting and confusing. Pretreatment with lidocaine and/or vecuronium is no longer recommended; however, high-dose fentanyl can be utilized to help blunt the sympathetic stimulation of intubation. Induction with etomidate is recommended; however, ketamine can be considered in the proper patient population, such as those with hypotension. Paralysis can be performed with either succinylcholine or rocuronium, with the caveat that rocuronium can lead to delays in proper neurological examinations due to prolonged paralysis...
April 25, 2018: Curēus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29789983/principles-of-fluid-management-and-stewardship-in-septic-shock-it-is-time-to-consider-the-four-d-s-and-the-four-phases-of-fluid-therapy
#12
REVIEW
Manu L N G Malbrain, Niels Van Regenmortel, Bernd Saugel, Brecht De Tavernier, Pieter-Jan Van Gaal, Olivier Joannes-Boyau, Jean-Louis Teboul, Todd W Rice, Monty Mythen, Xavier Monnet
In patients with septic shock, the administration of fluids during initial hemodynamic resuscitation remains a major therapeutic challenge. We are faced with many open questions regarding the type, dose and timing of intravenous fluid administration. There are only four major indications for intravenous fluid administration: aside from resuscitation, intravenous fluids have many other uses including maintenance and replacement of total body water and electrolytes, as carriers for medications and for parenteral nutrition...
May 22, 2018: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29736167/mechanisms-and-management-of-acute-pancreatitis
#13
REVIEW
Ari Garber, Catherine Frakes, Zubin Arora, Prabhleen Chahal
Acute pancreatitis represents a disorder characterized by acute necroinflammatory changes of the pancreas and is histologically characterized by acinar cell destruction. Diagnosed clinically with the Revised Atlanta Criteria, and with alcohol and cholelithiasis/choledocholithiasis as the two most prominent antecedents, acute pancreatitis ranks first amongst gastrointestinal diagnoses requiring admission and 21st amongst all diagnoses requiring hospitalization with estimated costs approximating 2.6 billion dollars annually...
2018: Gastroenterology Research and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/100001003/emergency-management-of-sepsis-the-simple-stuff-saves-lives
#14
David Sweet, Julian Marsden, Kendall Ho, Christina Krause, James A Russell
Many emergency departments have implemented sepsis protocols since the 2001 publication of results from the early goal-directed therapy trial, which showed early targeted resuscitation lowers mortality. As part of an attempt to improve clinical and operational outcomes for emergency departments across British Columbia, we reviewed sepsis management literature and considered sepsis protocol implementation in the province’s emergency departments. During the literature review we found that many observational studies confirmed an association between implementation of emergency sepsis protocols and decreased mortality...
May 2012: BC medical journal: BCMJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29704160/there-is-more-to-septic-shock-than-arterial-hypotension-and-elevated-lactate-levels-another-appeal-to-rethink-current-resuscitation-strategies
#15
REVIEW
Martin W Dünser, Arnaldo Dubin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 27, 2018: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29486781/vasoplegia-treatments-the-past-the-present-and-the-future
#16
REVIEW
Bruno Levy, Caroline Fritz, Elsa Tahon, Audrey Jacquot, Thomas Auchet, Antoine Kimmoun
Vasoplegia is a ubiquitous phenomenon in all advanced shock states, including septic, cardiogenic, hemorrhagic, and anaphylactic shock. Its pathophysiology is complex, involving various mechanisms in vascular smooth muscle cells such as G protein-coupled receptor desensitization (adrenoceptors, vasopressin 1 receptors, angiotensin type 1 receptors), alteration of second messenger pathways, critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency, and increased production of nitric oxide. This review, based on a critical appraisal of the literature, discusses the main current treatments and future approaches...
February 27, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29589205/hyperchloraemia-in-sepsis
#17
REVIEW
Christos Filis, Ioannis Vasileiadis, Antonia Koutsoukou
Chloride represents-quantitatively-the most prevalent, negatively charged, strong plasma electrolyte. Control of chloride concentration is a probable major mechanism for regulating the body's acid-base balance and for maintaining homeostasis of the entire internal environment. The difference between the concentrations of chloride and sodium constitutes the major contributor to the strong ion difference (SID); SID is the key pH regulator in the body, according to the physicochemical approach. Hyperchloraemia resulting from either underlying diseases or medical interventions is common in intensive care units...
March 27, 2018: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29675566/the-surviving-sepsis-campaign-bundle-2018-update
#18
EDITORIAL
Mitchell M Levy, Laura E Evans, Andrew Rhodes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2018: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29479665/scandinavian-ssai-clinical-practice-guideline-on-choice-of-inotropic-agent-for-patients-with-acute-circulatory-failure
#19
REVIEW
M H Møller, A Granholm, E Junttila, M Haney, A Oscarsson-Tibblin, A Haavind, J H Laake, E Wilkman, K Ö Sverrisson, A Perner
BACKGROUND: Adult critically ill patients often suffer from acute circulatory failure and those with low cardiac output may be treated with inotropic agents. The aim of this Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine guideline was to present patient-important treatment recommendations on this topic. METHODS: This guideline was developed according to GRADE. We assessed the following subpopulations of patients with shock: (1) shock in general, (2) septic shock, (3) cardiogenic shock, (4) hypovolemic shock, (5) shock after cardiac surgery, and (6) other types of shock, including vasodilatory shock...
April 2018: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29434652/the-open-abdomen-in-trauma-and-non-trauma-patients-wses-guidelines
#20
REVIEW
Federico Coccolini, Derek Roberts, Luca Ansaloni, Rao Ivatury, Emiliano Gamberini, Yoram Kluger, Ernest E Moore, Raul Coimbra, Andrew W Kirkpatrick, Bruno M Pereira, Giulia Montori, Marco Ceresoli, Fikri M Abu-Zidan, Massimo Sartelli, George Velmahos, Gustavo Pereira Fraga, Ari Leppaniemi, Matti Tolonen, Joseph Galante, Tarek Razek, Ron Maier, Miklosh Bala, Boris Sakakushev, Vladimir Khokha, Manu Malbrain, Vanni Agnoletti, Andrew Peitzman, Zaza Demetrashvili, Michael Sugrue, Salomone Di Saverio, Ingo Martzi, Kjetil Soreide, Walter Biffl, Paula Ferrada, Neil Parry, Philippe Montravers, Rita Maria Melotti, Francesco Salvetti, Tino M Valetti, Thomas Scalea, Osvaldo Chiara, Stefania Cimbanassi, Jeffry L Kashuk, Martha Larrea, Juan Alberto Martinez Hernandez, Heng-Fu Lin, Mircea Chirica, Catherine Arvieux, Camilla Bing, Tal Horer, Belinda De Simone, Peter Masiakos, Viktor Reva, Nicola DeAngelis, Kaoru Kike, Zsolt J Balogh, Paola Fugazzola, Matteo Tomasoni, Rifat Latifi, Noel Naidoo, Dieter Weber, Lauri Handolin, Kenji Inaba, Andreas Hecker, Yuan Kuo-Ching, Carlos A Ordoñez, Sandro Rizoli, Carlos Augusto Gomes, Marc De Moya, Imtiaz Wani, Alain Chichom Mefire, Ken Boffard, Lena Napolitano, Fausto Catena
Damage control resuscitation may lead to postoperative intra-abdominal hypertension or abdominal compartment syndrome. These conditions may result in a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle leading to severe physiologic derangements and multiorgan failure unless interrupted by abdominal (surgical or other) decompression. Further, in some clinical situations, the abdomen cannot be closed due to the visceral edema, the inability to control the compelling source of infection or the necessity to re-explore (as a "planned second-look" laparotomy) or complete previously initiated damage control procedures or in cases of abdominal wall disruption...
2018: World Journal of Emergency Surgery: WJES
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