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Sepsis

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13 papers 25 to 100 followers
By MD Aware Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025161/association-of-weekend-effect-with-early-mortality-in-severe-sepsis-patients-over-time
#1
Yu-Ning Shih, Yung-Tai Chen, Chia-Jen Shih, Shuo-Ming Ou, Yen-Tao Hsu, Ran-Chou Chen, Imoigele P Aisiku, Raghu R Seethala, Gyorgy Frendl, Peter C Hou
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to investigate the "weekend effect" and early mortality of patients with severe sepsis. METHODS: Using the Taiwanese National Healthcare Insurance Research Database, all patients who were hospitalized for the first time with an episode of severe sepsis between January 2000 and December 2011 were identified and the short-term mortality of patients admitted on weekdays was compared to those admitted on weekends. The primary endpoint was 7-day mortality...
December 23, 2016: Journal of Infection
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104099/coexisting-systemic-infections-in-patients-who-present-with-a-fall
#2
Alex Blair, Farrin A Manian
BACKGROUND: Although the causes of falls are legion, infectious disease-related factors are not commonly reported in the published literature. We investigated the characteristics of patients presenting to the hospital because of a fall and who were subsequently found to have a coexisting systemic infection (CSI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study performed at Massachusetts General Hospital, using the electronic database of adult patients receiving care during the period January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2014...
January 2017: American Journal of the Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28116595/early-risk-factors-and-the-role-of-fluid-administration-in-developing-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-in-septic-patients
#3
Raghu R Seethala, Peter C Hou, Imoigele P Aisiku, Gyorgy Frendl, Pauline K Park, Mark E Mikkelsen, Steven Y Chang, Ognjen Gajic, Jonathan Sevransky
BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a major risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there remains a paucity of literature examining risk factors for ARDS in septic patients early in their course. This study examined the role of early fluid administration and identified other risk factors within the first 6 h of hospital presentation associated with developing ARDS in septic patients. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of septic adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department or being admitted for high-risk elective surgery from the multicenter observational cohort study, US Critical Injury and Illness trial Group-Lung Injury Prevention Study 1 (USCIITG-LIPS 1, NCT00889772)...
December 2017: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28032484/treatment-of-methicillin-resistant-staphylococcus-aureus-bacteremia
#4
REVIEW
Eun Ju Choo, Henry F Chambers
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant cause of health care-associated infections. Vancomycin remains an acceptable treatment option. There has been a welcome increase in the number of agents available for the treatment of MRSA infection. These drugs have certain differentiating attributes and may offer some advantages over vancomycin, but they also have significant limitations. These agents provide some alternative when no other options are available.
December 2016: Infection & Chemotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28029487/newly-approved-antibiotics-and-antibiotics-reserved-for-resistant-infections-implications-for-emergency-medicine
#5
REVIEW
Maryann Mazer-Amirshahi, Ali Pourmand, Larissa May
Millions of patients are evaluated every year in the emergency department (ED) for bacterial infections. Emergency physicians often diagnose and prescribe initial antibiotic therapy for a variety of bacterial infections, ranging from simple urinary tract infections to severe sepsis. In life-threatening infections, inappropriate choice of initial antibiotic has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. As such, initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy on the part of the emergency physician is critical...
January 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27854067/attenuation-of-the-physiological-response-to-infection-on-adults-over-65%C3%A2-years-old-admitted-to-the-emergency-room-er
#6
Alejandro Marín Valencia, Carlos Eduardo Vallejo, Alba Luz León Alvarez, Fabian Alberto Jaimes
It has been considered that the elderly have clinical manifestations different from the ones observed in middle-age adults during an injury event. This hypothesis has not been extensively explored in sepsis and bacterial infections. Secondary analysis of two prospective studies including 2611 patients over 18 years of age admitted to the emergency room with confirmed or probable bacterial infections and sepsis. The outcome measures were heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, temperature, Glasgow Coma Scale, creatinine, PaO2/FiO2 and platelets daily during the first week...
November 16, 2016: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27816133/anesthesia-for-patients-with-concomitant-sepsis-and-cardiac-dysfunction
#7
REVIEW
Abed Abubaih, Charles Weissman
Anesthesiologists faced with a patient with sepsis and concurrent cardiac dysfunction must be cognizant of the patient's cardiac status and cause of the cardiac problem to appropriately adapt physiologic and metabolic monitoring and anesthetic management. Anesthesia in such patients is challenging because the interaction of sepsis and cardiac dysfunction greatly complicates management. Intraoperative anesthesia management requires careful induction and maintenance of anesthesia; optimizing intravascular volume status; avoiding lung injury during mechanical ventilation; and close monitoring of arterial blood gases, serum lactate concentrations, and hematology renal and electrolyte parameters...
December 2016: Anesthesiology Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27823892/practical-considerations-in-sepsis-resuscitation
#8
Brit Long, Alex Koyfman, Katharine L Modisett, Christian J Woods
BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a common condition managed in the emergency department, and the majority of patients respond to resuscitation measures, including antibiotics and i.v. fluids. However, a proportion of patients will fail to respond to standard treatment. OBJECTIVE: This review elucidates practical considerations for management of sepsis in patients who fail to respond to standard treatment. DISCUSSION: Early goal-directed therapy revolutionized sepsis management...
November 4, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27823893/sepsis-clinical-criteria-in-emergency-department-patients-admitted-to-an-intensive-care-unit-an-external-validation-study-of-quick-sequential-organ-failure-assessment
#9
Michael D April, Jose Aguirre, Lloyd I Tannenbaum, Tyler Moore, Alexander Pingree, Robert E Thaxton, Daniel J Sessions, James H Lantry
BACKGROUND: Quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) is a prognostic score for patients with sepsis. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to compare the area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC), sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios of qSOFA vs. systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS) in predicting in-hospital mortality among emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort chart review study of ED patients admitted to an ICU with suspected infection from August 1, 2012 to February 28, 2015...
November 4, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27423462/qsofa-does-not-replace-sirs-in-the-definition-of-sepsis
#10
Jean-Louis Vincent, Greg S Martin, Mitchell M Levy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 17, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27418577/management-of-adults-with-hospital-acquired-and-ventilator-associated-pneumonia-2016-clinical-practice-guidelines-by-the-infectious-diseases-society-of-america-and-the-american-thoracic-society
#11
Andre C Kalil, Mark L Metersky, Michael Klompas, John Muscedere, Daniel A Sweeney, Lucy B Palmer, Lena M Napolitano, Naomi P O'Grady, John G Bartlett, Jordi Carratalà, Ali A El Solh, Santiago Ewig, Paul D Fey, Thomas M File, Marcos I Restrepo, Jason A Roberts, Grant W Waterer, Peggy Cruse, Shandra L Knight, Jan L Brozek
It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia...
September 1, 2016: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27217054/sepsis-pathophysiology-and-clinical-management
#12
REVIEW
Jeffrey E Gotts, Michael A Matthay
Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock represent increasingly severe systemic inflammatory responses to infection. Sepsis is common in the aging population, and it disproportionately affects patients with cancer and underlying immunosuppression. In its most severe form, sepsis causes multiple organ dysfunction that can produce a state of chronic critical illness characterized by severe immune dysfunction and catabolism. Much has been learnt about the pathogenesis of sepsis at the molecular, cell, and intact organ level...
May 23, 2016: BMJ: British Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27229641/sepsis-resuscitation-fluid-choice-and-dose
#13
REVIEW
Matthew W Semler, Todd W Rice
Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding which fluid and in what amount remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, and large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research...
June 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
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