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By Faye Kehler Family Physician and GP Anesthetist since 1987 interested in all aspects of Medicine
Kevin Helgeson
Athletes with persistent anterolateral ankle discomfort may have developed sinus tarsi syndrome (STS). Sinus tarsi syndrome develops from excessive motions of the subtalar joint that results in subtalar joint synovitis and infiltration of fibrotic tissue into the sinus tarsi space. Physical therapists treating athletes with ankle conditions should examine the talocrural and subtalar joints for signs of hypermobility as injuries can affect both of these important articulations of the lower extremity. Localized ankle discomfort to the sinus tarsi space and feelings of instability with pronation and supination movements of the subtalar joint will help identify STS...
February 2009: North American Journal of Sports Physical Therapy: NAJSPT
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