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Emergency Care Practitioner—SA

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341 papers 100 to 500 followers
By Struan Reid Emergency Care Practitioner in South Africa with a passion for advanced airway management.
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29474217/technology-as-friend-or-foe-do-electronic-health-records-increase-burnout
#1
Jesse M Ehrenfeld, Jonathan P Wanderer
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent relevant studies regarding the use of electronic health records and physician burnout. RECENT FINDINGS: Recently acquired knowledge regarding the relationship between electronic health record use, professional satisfaction, burnout, and desire to leave clinical practice are discussed. SUMMARY: Adoption of electronic health records has increased across the United States and worldwide. Although electronic health records have many benefits, there is growing concern about the adverse consequences of their use on physician satisfaction and burnout...
June 2018: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351759/tracheal-intubation-in-critically-ill-patients-a-comprehensive-systematic-review-of-randomized-trials
#2
Luca Cabrini, Giovanni Landoni, Martina Baiardo Radaelli, Omar Saleh, Carmine D Votta, Evgeny Fominskiy, Alessandro Putzu, Cézar Daniel Snak de Souza, Massimo Antonelli, Rinaldo Bellomo, Paolo Pelosi, Alberto Zangrillo
BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled studies evaluating any drug, technique or device aimed at improving the success rate or safety of tracheal intubation in the critically ill. METHODS: We searched PubMed, BioMed Central, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials and references of retrieved articles. Finally, pertinent reviews were also scanned to detect further studies until May 2017. The following inclusion criteria were considered: tracheal intubation in adult critically ill patients; randomized controlled trial; study performed in Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department or ordinary ward; and work published in the last 20 years...
January 20, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29334496/oxygen-in-the-critically-ill-friend-or-foe
#3
REVIEW
Elisa Damiani, Abele Donati, Massimo Girardis
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To examine the potential harmful effects of hyperoxia and summarize the results of most recent clinical studies evaluating oxygen therapy in critically ill patients. RECENT FINDINGS: Excessive oxygen supplementation may have detrimental pulmonary and systemic effects because of enhanced oxidative stress and inflammation. Hyperoxia-induced lung injury includes altered surfactant protein composition, reduced mucociliary clearance and histological damage, resulting in atelectasis, reduced lung compliance and increased risk of infections...
April 2018: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29322502/systematic-review-of-benefits-or-harms-of-routine-anaesthetist-inserted-throat-packs-in-adults-practice-recommendations-for-inserting-and-counting-throat-packs-an-evidence-based-consensus-statement-by-the-difficult-airway-society-das-the-british-association
#4
REVIEW
V Athanassoglou, A Patel, B McGuire, A Higgs, M S Dover, P A Brennan, A Banerjee, B Bingham, J J Pandit
Throat packs are commonly inserted by anaesthetists after induction of anaesthesia for dental, maxillofacial, nasal or upper airway surgery. However, the evidence supporting this practice as routine is unclear, especially in the light of accidentally retained throat packs which constitute 'Never Events' as defined by NHS England. On behalf of three relevant national organisations, we therefore conducted a systematic review and literature search to assess the evidence base for benefit, and also the extent and severity of complications associated with throat pack use...
May 2018: Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29318006/naloxone-dosage-for-opioid-reversal-current-evidence-and-clinical-implications
#5
REVIEW
Rachael Rzasa Lynn, J L Galinkin
Opioid-related mortality is a growing problem in the United States, and in 2015 there were over 33,000 opioid-related deaths. To combat this mortality trend, naloxone is increasingly being utilized in a pre-hospital setting by emergency personnel and prescribed to laypersons for out-of-hospital administration. With increased utilization of naloxone there has been a subsequent reduction in mortality following an opioid overdose. Reversal of opioid toxicity may precipitate an opioid-withdrawal syndrome. At the same time, there is a risk of inadequate response or re-narcotization after the administration of a single dose of naloxone in patients who have taken large doses or long-acting opioid formulations, as the duration of effect of naloxone is shorter than that of many opioid agonists...
January 2018: Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29261566/cardiac-arrest-and-mortality-related-to-intubation-procedure-in-critically-ill-adult-patients-a-multicenter-cohort-study
#6
Audrey De Jong, Amélie Rolle, Nicolas Molinari, Catherine Paugam-Burtz, Jean-Michel Constantin, Jean-Yves Lefrant, Karim Asehnoune, Boris Jung, Emmanuel Futier, Gérald Chanques, Elie Azoulay, Samir Jaber
OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for cardiac arrest during intubation in ICU, as well as the association of ICU intubation-related cardiac arrest with 28-day mortality. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. SETTING: Sixty-four French ICUs. PATIENTS: Critically ill patients requiring intubation in the ICU. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: During the 1,847 intubation procedures included, 49 cardiac arrests (2...
April 2018: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239753/the-use-of-intranasal-analgesia-for-acute-pain-control-in-the-emergency-department-a-literature-review
#7
REVIEW
Billy Sin, Jennifer Wiafe, Christine Ciaramella, Luis Valdez, Sergey M Motov
BACKGROUND: Traditional routes for administration of pain medications include oral (PO), intravenous (IV), or intramuscular routes (IM). When these routes are not feasible, the intranasal (IN) route may be considered. The objectives of this evidence-based review were: to review the literature which compared the safety and efficacy of IN analgesia to traditional routes and to determine if IN analgesia should be considered over traditional routes for acute pain control in the ED. METHODS: The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from July 1970 to July 2017 were searched...
February 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26889019/physiology-of-drowning-a-review
#8
REVIEW
Joost J L M Bierens, Philippe Lunetta, Mike Tipton, David S Warner
Drowning physiology relates to two different events: immersion (upper airway above water) and submersion (upper airway under water). Immersion involves integrated cardiorespiratory responses to skin and deep body temperature, including cold shock, physical incapacitation, and hypovolemia, as precursors of collapse and submersion. The physiology of submersion includes fear of drowning, diving response, autonomic conflict, upper airway reflexes, water aspiration and swallowing, emesis, and electrolyte disorders...
March 2016: Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29123910/management-of-pediatric-cannot-intubate-cannot-oxygenate
#9
Yohei Okada, Wataru Ishii, Norio Sato, Hirokazu Kotani, Ryoji Iiduka
Case: "Cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate" (CICO) is a rare, life-threatening situation. We describe a pediatric case of CICO and highlight some educational points.A 3-year-old boy who collapsed in the bathtub came to our emergency department. On admission, he went into cardiac arrest probably because of an airway obstruction. We judged his condition as CICO and carried out an emergent tracheostomy after several attempts to perform a cricothyroidotomy failed. We continued resuscitation; however, circulation did not return spontaneously...
October 2017: Acute Medicine & Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149469/cuffed-versus-uncuffed-endotracheal-tubes-for-general-anaesthesia-in-children-aged-eight-years-and-under
#10
REVIEW
Flavia A De Orange, Rebeca Gac Andrade, Andrea Lemos, Paulo Sgn Borges, José N Figueiroa, Pete G Kovatsis
BACKGROUND: Since the introduction of endotracheal intubation in paediatrics, uncuffed endotracheal tubes (ETTs) have been the standard of care for children under eight years old, based on the presumption that complications, particularly postoperative stridor, are higher with cuffed ETTs. The major disadvantages of uncuffed ETTs cited for this shift in procedure include the difficulty in achieving tidal volumes due to leakage around an uncuffed ETT. To seal the airway adequately, uncuffed tubes may need to be exchanged for another tube with a larger diameter, which sometimes requires several attempts before the appropriate size is found...
November 17, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29161401/the-evolution-of-airway-management-new-concepts-and-conflicts-with-traditional-practice
#11
A F McNarry, A Patel
In the last 25 yr, there have been several advances in the safe management of the airway. Videolaryngoscopes and supraglottic airways, now in routine use by new trainees in anaesthesia, have had their genesis in the recent past. The 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Difficult Airway Society published in 2011 a seminal report that has influenced airway management worldwide . Understanding how the report's recommendations were constructed and how clinical guidelines compliment rather than contradict them is important in understanding the tenets of safe airway management...
December 1, 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29176376/anticipated-and-unanticipated-difficult-airway-management
#12
REVIEW
Zeping Xu, Wuhua Ma, Douglas L Hester, Yandong Jiang
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Management of difficult airway is far from optimal despite of continuous progress in science and technology. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current research in the field and bring readers up to date. RECENT FINDINGS: New technologies for intubation make providers more confident to handle difficult airways, but there is lack of evidence indicating the reduction in incidence of 'cannot intubate cannot ventilate (CICV)'. Optimization of mask ventilation should reduce the incidence of difficult mask ventilation but it is greatly underappreciated...
February 2018: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29114010/2017-international-consensus-on-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-and-emergency-cardiovascular-care-science-with-treatment-recommendations-summary
#13
REVIEW
Theresa M Olasveengen, Allan R de Caen, Mary E Mancini, Ian K Maconochie, Richard Aickin, Dianne L Atkins, Robert A Berg, Robert M Bingham, Steven C Brooks, Maaret Castrén, Sung Phil Chung, Julie Considine, Thomaz Bittencourt Couto, Raffo Escalante, Raúl J Gazmuri, Anne-Marie Guerguerian, Tetsuo Hatanaka, Rudolph W Koster, Peter J Kudenchuk, Eddy Lang, Swee Han Lim, Bo Løfgren, Peter A Meaney, William H Montgomery, Peter T Morley, Laurie J Morrison, Kevin J Nation, Kee-Chong Ng, Vinay M Nadkarni, Chika Nishiyama, Gabrielle Nuthall, Gene Yong-Kwang Ong, Gavin D Perkins, Amelia G Reis, Giuseppe Ristagno, Tetsuya Sakamoto, Michael R Sayre, Stephen M Schexnayder, Alfredo F Sierra, Eunice M Singletary, Naoki Shimizu, Michael A Smyth, David Stanton, Janice A Tijssen, Andrew Travers, Christian Vaillancourt, Patrick Van de Voorde, Mary Fran Hazinski, Jerry P Nolan
The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation has initiated a near-continuous review of cardiopulmonary resuscitation science that replaces the previous 5-year cyclic batch-and-queue approach process. This is the first of an annual series of International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations summary articles that will include the cardiopulmonary resuscitation science reviewed by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation in the previous year...
December 5, 2017: Circulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29210033/strategies-for-the-prevention-of-airway-complications-a-narrative-review
#14
REVIEW
T M Cook
Despite being infrequent, complications of airway management remain an important contributor to morbidity and mortality during anaesthesia and care of the critically ill. Developments in the last three decades have made anaesthesia safer, and this has been mirrored in the equipment and techniques available for airway management. Modern technology including novel oxygenation modalities, widespread availability of capnography, second-generation supraglottic airway devices and videolaryngoscopy provide the tools to make airway management safer still...
January 2018: Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29208322/face-mask-leak-with-nasal-cannula-during-noninvasive-positive-pressure-ventilation-a-randomized-crossover-trial
#15
Derek J Brown, Stephen M Carroll, Michael D April
BACKGROUND: Nasal cannula can achieve apneic oxygenation during emergency intubation. However, pre-procedure nasal cannula placement may be difficult in patients undergoing non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) prior to intubation. Our objective was to compare mask leak during NPPV with versus without simultaneous application of nasal cannula. We hypothesized mask leak would be no worse with concomitant use of nasal cannula (non-inferiority design). METHODS: We performed a randomized crossover non-inferiority study of healthy volunteers...
June 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149941/pathophysiology-of-septic-shock
#16
REVIEW
James A Russell, Barret Rush, John Boyd
Fundamental features of septic shock are vasodilation, increased permeability, hypovolemia, and ventricular dysfunction. Vasodilation owing to increased nitric oxide and prostaglandins is treated with vasopressors (norepinephrine first). Increased permeability relates to several pathways (Slit/Robo4, vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin 1 and 2/Tie2 pathway, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and heparin-binding protein), some of which are targets for therapies. Hypovolemia is common and crystalloid is recommended for fluid resuscitation...
January 2018: Critical Care Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29177587/intranasal-therapy-to-stop-status-epilepticus-in-prehospital-settings
#17
REVIEW
John Benfield, Alberto Musto
Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency characterized by uncontrolled, prolonged seizures with rapid and widespread neuronal damage. Patients that suffer from longer episodes of SE are more likely to have poorer clinical outcomes and a higher cost of healthcare. Understanding novel molecular mechanisms that regulate inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission that initiate SE and the necessary medical infrastructure to stop SE could help identify targets for early intervention. Intranasal administration of benzodiazepines may shorten the time between initiation and cessation of seizures when compared to other routes of administration...
March 2018: Drugs in R&D
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132582/airway-management-in-trauma
#18
REVIEW
George Kovacs, Nicholas Sowers
Airway management in the trauma patient presents numerous unique challenges beyond placement of an endotracheal tube and outcomes are dependent on the provider's ability to anticipate difficulty. Airway management strategies for the care of the polytrauma patient are reviewed, with specific considerations for those presenting with traumatic brain injury, suspected c-spine injury, the contaminated airway, the agitated trauma patient, maxillofacial trauma, and the traumatized airway. An approach to airway management that considers the potential anatomic and physiologic challenges in caring for these complicated trauma patients is presented...
February 2018: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29105540/mechanically-ventilating-the-severe-asthmatic
#19
Abdullah E Laher, Sean K Buchanan
The management of the critically ill patients with asthma can be rather challenging. Potentially devastating complications relating to this presentation include hypoxemia, worsening bronchospasm, pulmonary aspiration, tension pneumothorax, dynamic hyperinflation, hypotension, dysrhythmias, and seizures. In contrast to various other pathologies requiring mechanical ventilation, acute asthma is generally associated with better outcomes. This review serves as a practical guide to the physician managing patients with severe acute asthma requiring mechanical ventilation...
September 2018: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29020354/the-definition-of-the-brugada-syndrome
#20
REVIEW
Juan Sieira, Pedro Brugada
Brugada syndrome (BS) is an inherited disease characterized by a coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads and increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), in the absence of structural abnormalities. The cornerstone of BS diagnosis and definition, is its characteristic ECG pattern that can be present spontaneously or unmasked by drugs. Brugada syndrome was first described 25 years ago; paradoxically, in an era of great technological development, a new syndrome was described with a technology developed almost a century before...
October 21, 2017: European Heart Journal
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