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Kidney stones

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6 papers 500 to 1000 followers
By Faye Kehler Family Physician and GP Anesthetist since 1987 interested in all aspects of Medicine
Amir Qaseem, Paul Dallas, Mary Ann Forciea, Melissa Starkey, Thomas D Denberg
DESCRIPTION: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on the comparative effectiveness and safety of preventive dietary and pharmacologic management of recurrent nephrolithiasis in adults. METHODS: This guideline is based on published literature on this topic that was identified using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (through March 2014), Google Scholar, ClinicalTrials...
November 4, 2014: Annals of Internal Medicine
Hongshi Xu, Anna L Zisman, Fredric L Coe, Elaine M Worcester
INTRODUCTION: Kidney stones are a common problem worldwide with substantial morbidities and economic costs. Medical therapy reduces stone recurrence significantly. Much progress has been made in the last several decades in improving therapy of stone disease. AREAS COVERED: This review discusses i) the effect of medical expulsive therapy on spontaneous stone passage, ii) pharmacotherapy in the prevention of stone recurrence and iii) future directions in the treatment of kidney stone disease...
March 2013: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Fredric L Coe, Andrew Evan, Elaine Worcester
Idiopathic calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone-formers (ICSFs) differ from patients who make idiopathic calcium phosphate (CaP) stones (IPSFs). ICSFs, but not IPSFs, form their stones as overgrowths on interstitial apatite plaque; the amount of plaque covering papillary surface is positively correlated with urine calcium excretion and inversely with urine volume. The amount of plaque predicts the number of recurrent stones. The initial crystal overgrowth on plaque is CaP, although the stone is mainly composed of CaOx, meaning that lowering supersaturation (SS) for CaOx and CaP is important for CaOx stone prevention...
August 2011: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: CJASN
Marcia Davis, Mary Wolff
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2011: Journal of Renal Nutrition
Rebecca Smith-Bindman, Chandra Aubin, John Bailitz, Rimon N Bengiamin, Carlos A Camargo, Jill Corbo, Anthony J Dean, Ruth B Goldstein, Richard T Griffey, Gregory D Jay, Tarina L Kang, Dana R Kriesel, O John Ma, Michael Mallin, William Manson, Joy Melnikow, Diana L Miglioretti, Sara K Miller, Lisa D Mills, James R Miner, Michelle Moghadassi, Vicki E Noble, Gregory M Press, Marshall L Stoller, Victoria E Valencia, Jessica Wang, Ralph C Wang, Steven R Cummings
BACKGROUND: There is a lack of consensus about whether the initial imaging method for patients with suspected nephrolithiasis should be computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography. METHODS: In this multicenter, pragmatic, comparative effectiveness trial, we randomly assigned patients 18 to 76 years of age who presented to the emergency department with suspected nephrolithiasis to undergo initial diagnostic ultrasonography performed by an emergency physician (point-of-care ultrasonography), ultrasonography performed by a radiologist (radiology ultrasonography), or abdominal CT...
September 18, 2014: New England Journal of Medicine
Lynda Frassetto, Ingrid Kohlstadt
The incidence of nephrolithiasis (kidney stones) is rising worldwide, especially in women and with increasing age. Kidney stones are associated with chronic kidney disease. Preventing recurrence is largely specific to the type of stone (e.g., calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, cystine, struvite [magnesium ammonium phosphate]), and uric acid stones); however, even when the stone cannot be retrieved, urine pH and 24-hour urine assessment provide information about stone-forming factors that can guide prevention...
December 1, 2011: American Family Physician
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