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5 papers 25 to 100 followers
By Ana Monteiro Md/phd student
Dipak Kotecha, Jane Holmes, Henry Krum, Douglas G Altman, Luis Manzano, John G F Cleland, Gregory Y H Lip, Andrew J S Coats, Bert Andersson, Paulus Kirchhof, Thomas G von Lueder, Hans Wedel, Giuseppe Rosano, Marcelo C Shibata, Alan Rigby, Marcus D Flather
BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation and heart failure often coexist, causing substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. β blockers are indicated in patients with symptomatic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction; however, the efficacy of these drugs in patients with concomitant atrial fibrillation is uncertain. We therefore meta-analysed individual-patient data to assess the efficacy of β blockers in patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm compared with atrial fibrillation...
December 20, 2014: Lancet
Christian T Ruff, Robert P Giugliano, Eugene Braunwald, Elaine B Hoffman, Naveen Deenadayalu, Michael D Ezekowitz, A John Camm, Jeffrey I Weitz, Basil S Lewis, Alexander Parkhomenko, Takeshi Yamashita, Elliott M Antman
BACKGROUND: Four new oral anticoagulants compare favourably with warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation; however, the balance between efficacy and safety in subgroups needs better definition. We aimed to assess the relative benefit of new oral anticoagulants in key subgroups, and the effects on important secondary outcomes. METHODS: We searched Medline from Jan 1, 2009, to Nov 19, 2013, limiting searches to phase 3, randomised trials of patients with atrial fibrillation who were randomised to receive new oral anticoagulants or warfarin, and trials in which both efficacy and safety outcomes were reported...
March 15, 2014: Lancet
Aaron Liew, John W Eikelboom, Martin O'Donnell, Robert G Hart
Warfarin is effective for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolism but produces variable anticoagulant effects and requires routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio (INR) to optimize the balance between efficacy and safety. The new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have a more predictable anticoagulant effect and were recently demonstrated to be at least as efficacious and safe as warfarin despite being administered in fixed doses without routine coagulation monitoring. Specific laboratory tests have been developed to measure the anticoagulant effect of the NOACs but are not yet widely available, and the relation between drug levels and both coagulation test results and outcomes is uncertain...
July 2013: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Larry R Jackson, Richard C Becker
Novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) provide an effective and, in some cases, superior alternative to traditional, oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. These drugs differ in their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles, which is important for selecting the right drug for the right patient. A concern among clinicians is a virtual absence of guidance from clinical trials for reversing the anticoagulant effects of these drugs in clinical settings such as life-threatening bleeding or a need for emergent procedures that carry bleeding risk...
April 2014: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
Denis Roy, Mario Talajic, Stanley Nattel, D George Wyse, Paul Dorian, Kerry L Lee, Martial G Bourassa, J Malcolm O Arnold, Alfred E Buxton, A John Camm, Stuart J Connolly, Marc Dubuc, Anique Ducharme, Peter G Guerra, Stefan H Hohnloser, Jean Lambert, Jean-Yves Le Heuzey, Gilles O'Hara, Ole Dyg Pedersen, Jean-Lucien Rouleau, Bramah N Singh, Lynne Warner Stevenson, William G Stevenson, Bernard Thibault, Albert L Waldo
BACKGROUND: It is common practice to restore and maintain sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure. This approach is based in part on data indicating that atrial fibrillation is a predictor of death in patients with heart failure and suggesting that the suppression of atrial fibrillation may favorably affect the outcome. However, the benefits and risks of this approach have not been adequately studied. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, randomized trial comparing the maintenance of sinus rhythm (rhythm control) with control of the ventricular rate (rate control) in patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% or less, symptoms of congestive heart failure, and a history of atrial fibrillation...
June 19, 2008: New England Journal of Medicine
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