collection
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

High flo nasal canula: how, why, when

shared collection
2 papers 0 to 25 followers
By Jason Mann No BS pulmonary critical care fellow
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26969671/use-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygenation-in-icu-adults-a-narrative-review
#1
REVIEW
Laurent Papazian, Amanda Corley, Dean Hess, John F Fraser, Jean-Pierre Frat, Christophe Guitton, Samir Jaber, Salvatore M Maggiore, Stefano Nava, Jordi Rello, Jean-Damien Ricard, François Stephan, Rocco Trisolini, Elie Azoulay
Oxygen therapy can be delivered using low-flow, intermediate-flow (air entrainment mask), or high-flow devices. Low/intermediate-flow oxygen devices have several drawbacks that cause critically ill patients discomfort and translate into suboptimal clinical results. These include limitation of the FiO2 (due to the high inspiratory flow often observed in patients with respiratory failure), and insufficient humidification and warming of the inspired gas. High-flow nasal cannula oxygenation (HFNCO) delivers oxygen flow rates of up to 60 L/min and over the last decade its effect on clinical outcomes has widely been evaluated, such as in the improvement of respiratory distress, the need for intubation, and mortality...
September 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23271822/high-flow-oxygen-administration-by-nasal-cannula-for-adult-and-perinatal-patients
#2
REVIEW
Jeffrey J Ward
The nasal cannula has been a commonly used patient interface to provide supplemental oxygen since its introduction in the 1940s. Traditionally, it has been categorized as a low-flow device and capable of delivering a 0.4 F(IO(2)) with flows up to 6 L/min to adults with normal minute ventilation. However, there is considerable performance variability among patients and design, which results in an exponential decline in delivered F(IO(2)) as breathing frequencies increase. The nasal cannula has also been successfully adapted for use in perinatal and pediatric respiratory care; flows are reduced, in the range of 0...
January 2013: Respiratory Care
1
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"