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312 papers 100 to 500 followers NICU
By Barbara Aninakwa Advance Neonatal Nurse Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28137355/preeclampsia-and-care-of-the-newborn
#1
Julie Cardona, Mary Lou Simoncelli, Courtney Sexton, Deborah A Raines
Preeclampsia is one of the most common complications in the last half of pregnancy. Mother-baby nurses are often present at the birth to provide neonatal care as well as ongoing care during the first days of life. This article discusses the implications of preeclampsia for the neonate and the role of the mother-baby nurse in the care of these infants.
January 1, 2017: Neonatal Network: NN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092694/proton-pump-inhibitors-risks-of-long-term-use
#2
REVIEW
Leonardo Henry Eusebi, Stefano Rabitti, Maria Laura Artesiani, Dania Gelli, Marco Montagnani, Rocco Maurizio Zagari, Franco Bazzoli
Proton pump inhibitors are among the most commonly prescribed classes of drugs and their use is increasing, in particular for long term treatment, often being over-prescribed and used for inappropriate conditions. In recent years, considerable attention has been directed towards a wide range of adverse effects, and even when a potential underlying biological mechanism is plausible, the clinical evidence of the adverse effect is often weak. Several long term side effects have been investigated ranging from interaction with other drugs, increased risk of infection, reduced intestinal absorption of vitamins and minerals, and more recently kidney damage and dementia...
January 16, 2017: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27522622/lactic-acidosis-an-update
#3
Jansen Seheult, Gerard Fitzpatrick, Gerard Boran
Lactate is one of the most crucial intermediates in carbohydrate and nonessential amino acid metabolism. The complexity of cellular interactions and metabolism means that lactate can be considered a waste product for one cell but a useful substrate for another. The presence of elevated lactate levels in critically ill patients has important implications for morbidity and mortality. In this review, we provide a brief outline of the metabolism of lactate, the pathophysiology of lactic acidosis, the clinical significance of D-lactate, the role of lactate measurement in acutely ill patients, the methods used to measure lactate in blood or plasma and some of the methodological issues related to interferences in these assays, especially in the case of ethylene glycol poisoning...
March 1, 2017: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: CCLM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986328/pathogenesis-of-nec-impact-of-an-altered-intestinal-microbiome
#4
REVIEW
Josef Neu, Mohan Pammi
Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a disease most commonly seen in preterm infants, often presents without warning and is associated with very high mortality and morbidity. Progress in the prevention and treatment of NEC has been slow. In this article, we will discuss some of the reasons as to why this progress has been slow. We will describe some of the factors that appear to be highly associated and important components in the pathophysiology of NEC. We will discuss the intestinal microbial environment of the fetus as well as the preterm infant and how interaction of dysbiosis with an immature gastrointestinal tract combined with dietary factors play a role in the pathogenesis of NEC...
December 13, 2016: Seminars in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28110612/efficacy-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-intensive-care-units
#5
Timothy N Liesching, Yuxiu Lei
PURPOSE: We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the physiological and clinical outcomes of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) with standard oxygen (O2) or conventional noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in intensive care units (ICUs). PROCEDURES: We selected the full-text prospective studies comparing HFNC with standard O2 or NIV in ICU. The continuous variables were analyzed with sample size-adjusted pooled t test. The categorical variables were extracted and combined for recalculating odds ratio...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28034548/acute-kidney-injury-in-the-fetus-and-neonate
#6
REVIEW
Arwa Nada, Elizabeth M Bonachea, David J Askenazi
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an under-recognized morbidity of neonates; the incidence remains unclear due to the absence of a unified definition of AKI in this population and because previous studies have varied greatly in screening for AKI with serum creatinine and urine output assessments. Premature infants may be born with less than half of the nephrons compared with term neonates, predisposing them to chronic kidney disease (CKD) early on in life and as they age. AKI can also lead to CKD, and premature infants with AKI may be at very high risk for long-term kidney problems...
December 26, 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28096129/current-knowledge-of-necrotizing-enterocolitis-in-preterm-infants-and-the-impact-of-different-types-of-enteral-nutrition-products
#7
REVIEW
Jocelyn Shulhan, Bryan Dicken, Lisa Hartling, Bodil Mk Larsen
Preterm infants are extremely vulnerable to a range of morbidities and mortality. Underdeveloped cardiac, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and immune systems in the preterm period increase the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a serious disease of the gut. NEC affects 5-12% of very-low birth-weight infants, leads to surgery in 20-40% of cases, and is fatal in 25-50% of cases. There are multiple factors that may contribute to NEC, but the exact cause is not yet fully understood. Severe cases can result in intestinal resection or death, and the health care costs average >$300,000/infant when surgical management is required...
January 2017: Advances in Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27605513/neonatal-hypoglycemia
#8
REVIEW
David H Adamkin
A consistent definition for neonatal hypoglycemia in the first 48 h of life continues to elude us. Enhanced understanding of metabolic disturbances and genetic disorders that underlie alterations in postnatal glucose homeostasis has added useful information to understanding transitional hypoglycemia. This growth in knowledge still has not led to what we need to know: "How low is too low and for how long?" This article reviews the current state of understanding of neonatal hypoglycemia and how different approaches reach different "expert" opinions...
February 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28001143/vital-signs-and-their-cross-correlation-in-sepsis-and-nec-a-study-of-1-065-very-low-birth-weight-infants-in-two-nicus
#9
Karen D Fairchild, Douglas E Lake, John Kattwinkel, J Randall Moorman, David A Bateman, Philip G Grieve, Joseph R Isler, Rakesh Sahni
BACKGROUND: Subtle changes in vital signs and their interactions occur in preterm infants prior to overt deterioration from late-onset septicemia (LOS) or necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Optimizing predictive algorithms may lead to earlier treatment. METHODS: For 1,065 very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants in two neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), mean, SD, and cross-correlation of respiratory rate, heart rate (HR), and oxygen saturation (SpO2) were analyzed hourly (131 infant-years' data)...
February 2017: Pediatric Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28109705/renal-function-in-the-fetus-and-neonate-the-creatinine-enigma
#10
REVIEW
Justin T Kastl
The use of serum creatinine levels to estimate glomerular function in infants is admittedly fraught with inherent inaccuracies which are both physiological and methodological in nature. This characteristic can understandably reduce the neonatal clinician's confidence in the ability of serum creatinine levels to provide useful information relevant to their patients' medical care. The aim of this review is to provide further insight into the peculiarities of serum creatinine trends in both premature and term infants with special focus on the maturational and developmental changes occurring in the kidney during this crucial time-period...
January 18, 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27595621/preterm-formula-use-in-the-preterm-very-low-birth-weight-infant
#11
REVIEW
William W Hay, Kendra C Hendrickson
Whereas human milk is the recommended diet for all infants, preterm formulas are indicated for enteral feeding of preterm very low birth weight infants when sufficient maternal breast milk and donor human milk are not available. Feeding with preterm formulas helps to ensure consistent delivery of nutrients. The balance of risks and benefits of feeding preterm formulas versus supplemented maternal and donor breast milk for preterm infants, however, is uncertain. Numerous studies and extensive practice have shown improved growth with preterm formulas, but there is concern for increased risks of necrotizing enterocolitis, possibly from cow milk antigen in the formulas or from different gut microbiomes, increased duration of total parenteral nutrition, and increased rates of sepsis in infants receiving preterm formulas...
February 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852668/less-invasive-surfactant-administration-versus-intubation-for-surfactant-delivery-in-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#12
REVIEW
Jose C Aldana-Aguirre, Merlin Pinto, Robin M Featherstone, Manoj Kumar
CONTEXT: In spontaneously breathing preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) receiving nasal continuous positive airway pressure, a method of less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) using a thin catheter has been described as an alternative to endotracheal intubation for surfactant delivery to reduce lung injury. OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LISA with the standard method of surfactant delivery for clinical outcomes...
January 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26906338/high-frequency-ventilation-for-non-invasive-respiratory-support-of-neonates
#13
REVIEW
Bradley A Yoder, K H Albertine, D M Null
Non-invasive respiratory support is increasingly used in lieu of intubated ventilator support for the management of neonatal respiratory failure, particularly in very low birth weight infants at risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The optimal approach and mode for non-invasive support remains uncertain. This article reviews the application of high-frequency ventilation for non-invasive respiratory support in neonates, including basic science studies on mechanics of gas exchange, animal model investigations, and a review of current clinical use in human neonates...
June 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27881286/renal-adaptive-changes-and-sodium-handling-in-the-fetal-to-newborn-transition
#14
REVIEW
Jeffrey L Segar
Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management is critical for optimal care of very low birth weight or sick infants. Delivery of such care requires an understanding of developmental changes in renal water and salt handling that occur with advancing gestational age as well as postnatal age. This review focuses on the principles of sodium homeostasis during fetal and postnatal life. The physiology of renal tubular transport mechanisms, as well as neurohumoral factors impacting renal tubular transport are highlighted...
November 20, 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974340/end-of-life-decisions-for-fragile-neonates-navigating-between-opinion-and-evidence-based-medicine
#15
EDITORIAL
Annie Janvier, Barbara Farlow, Eduard Verhagen, Keith Barrington
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 14, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24772800/treatment-for-early-onset-neonatal-sepsis
#16
REVIEW
Hisham Abdelrhim, Paul Anthony Heaton, Christine Routley, Siba Prosad Paul
Up to one in 10 neonates are investigated and treated for neonatal sepsis, although most are later found to be uninfected. This review discusses identifying and treating this emergency condition and how implementing NICE guidance could reduce treatment time in well babies and saveonatal sepsis resources without compromising care.
April 2, 2014: Nursing Times
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25526912/management-of-neonatal-early-onset-sepsis-cg149-compliance-of-neonatal-units-in-the-uk-with-nice-recommendations
#17
LETTER
Arindam Mukherjee, Babu Ramalingaiah, Nigel Kennea, Donovan Alistair Duffy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2015: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27940705/epidemiology-of-invasive-early-onset-neonatal-sepsis-2005-to-2014
#18
Stephanie J Schrag, Monica M Farley, Susan Petit, Arthur Reingold, Emily J Weston, Tracy Pondo, Jennifer Hudson Jain, Ruth Lynfield
BACKGROUND: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) and Escherichia coli have historically dominated as causes of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Widespread use of intrapartum prophylaxis for GBS disease led to concerns about the potential adverse impact on E coli incidence. METHODS: Active, laboratory, and population-based surveillance for culture-positive (blood or cerebrospinal fluid) bacterial infections among infants 0 to 2 days of age was conducted statewide in Minnesota and Connecticut and in selected counties of California and Georgia during 2005 to 2014...
December 2016: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27923247/patterns-of-empiric-antibiotic-administration-for-presumed-early-onset-neonatal-sepsis-in-neonatal-intensive-care-units-in-the-united-states
#19
Emily A Oliver, Patricia B Reagan, Jonathan L Slaughter, Catalin S Buhimschi, Irina A Buhimschi
Objective To evaluate current patterns in empiric antibiotic use for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). Study Design Retrospective population-based cohort study of newborns admitted on postnatal day 0 to 1 and discharged from NICUs participating in the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS 2006-2013). Analyses included frequency of antibiotic initiation within 3 days of birth, duration of first course, and variation among hospitals. Results Of 158,907 newborns, 118,624 (74.7%) received antibiotics on or before postnatal day 3...
December 6, 2016: American Journal of Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26948457/application-of-sepsis-calculator-in-newborns-with-suspected-infection
#20
Marleen Kerste, Jellina Corver, Martine C Sonnevelt, Monique van Brakel, Paul D van der Linden, Babette A M Braams-Lisman, Frans B Plötz
OBJECTIVE: To compare actual antibiotic use to the stratification based on the sepsis calculator in newborns with suspected early onset sepsis (EOS). To investigate differences in EOS risk and vital signs between newborns that received early (<12 h) versus late antibiotics (≥12 h of life). METHODS: Newborns born ≥34 weeks gestation in 2014 treated with antibiotics started within 72 h after birth were included. We calculated the risk per 1000 live births and retrospectively assigned each newborn to one of four recommended categories using the sepsis calculator...
December 2016: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
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