MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search
OPEN IN READ APP
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Spontaneous occlusion of the circle of Willis in children: pediatric moyamoya summary with proposed evidence-based practice guidelines. A review

Edward R Smith, R Michael Scott
Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics 2012, 9 (4): 353-60
22462697
Moyamoya is a progressive arteriopathy of unknown origin affecting the branches of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The arteriopathy can present as an isolated medical condition, affecting both sides of the brain ("moyamoya disease") or can be unilateral or found in association with systemic disorders ("moyamoya syndrome"). The ischemia resulting from luminal narrowing predisposes children to transient ischemic attacks and stroke-the primary presentations of affected patients. Although it is rare-affecting 1 in 1 million children in the US-moyamoya is implicated in 6% of all childhood strokes. Diagnosis is defined by characteristic findings on arteriograms, including stenosis of the branches of the ICA and a pathognomonic spray of small collateral vessels in this region, descriptively likened to a "puff of smoke" ("moyamoya" in Japanese). Treatment is predicated on restoration of cerebral blood flow by surgical revascularization. The rarity of this disorder has limited research and the development of evidence-based clinical management. While acknowledging these limitations, in this article the authors aim to summarize current studies of pediatric moyamoya, with the objective of providing a framework for construction of evidence-based guidelines for treatment. The compilation of current data in these guidelines should serve as a resource to aid pediatric neurosurgeons in their role as advocates for providing appropriate care to affected children.

Comments

You need to log in or sign up for an account to be able to comment.

No comments yet, be the first to post one!

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store

Read Institutional Edition
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
22462697
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"