MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search
OPEN IN READ APP
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Decision making at a time of crisis near the end of life

David E Weissman
JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association 2004 October 13, 292 (14): 1738-43
15479939
As patients approach the end of life, their disease process may create an immediate life-threatening emergency, yet invasive interventions may be less likely to provide benefit while carrying the same or greater risks. Knowing when it is time to shift from life-prolonging to more palliative approaches, focused on quality of life and comfort, is emotionally and clinically challenging for patients, families, and physicians. Key factors in the decision process include prognosis, risk-benefit analysis of the proposed intervention, current symptom burden, temporal pattern of the illness, patient's age and life stage, and the patient's goals of care. A structured approach to decision making includes assessing the patient's physical, psychological, and spiritual needs; assessing the patient's support system; discussing prognosis; and assessing patient-specific goals. Physicians can best help patients decide which treatments are appropriate by taking the necessary time to explore all curative and palliative care options, providing honest and timely prognostic information, making clear recommendations, facilitating patient-family discussions, and affirming patient choices.

Comments

You need to log in or sign up for an account to be able to comment.

No comments yet, be the first to post one!

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store

Read Institutional Edition
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
15479939
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"