keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Eusociality

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909951/contrasting-patterns-in-solitary-and-eusocial-bees-while-responding-to-landscape-features-in-the-brazilian-cerrado-a-multiscaled-perspective
#1
D P Silva, D S Nogueira, P De Marco
Landscape structure is an important determinant of biological fluxes and species composition, but species do not respond equally to landscape features or spatial extents. Evaluating "multi-scale" responses of species to landscape structure is an important framework to be considered, allowing insights about habitat requirements for different groups. We evaluated the response of Brazilian Cerrado's bees (eusocial vs. solitary ones) to both the amount and isolation of remnant vegetation in eight nested multiple-local scales...
December 1, 2016: Neotropical Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27887862/report-on-the-microbiota-of-melipona-quadrifasciata-affected-by-a-recurrent-disease
#2
Sebastián Díaz, Sarah de Souza Urbano, Lílian Caesar, Betina Blochtein, Aroni Sattler, Valmir Zuge, Karen Luisa Haag
Melipona quadrifasciata is an eusocial stingless bee traditionally used for honey production in Brazil. In the last decades, the species disappeared from the wild in Southern Brazil, being kept exclusively in managed colonies for commercial and recreational purposes. Stingless beekeepers from this region report annual losses of their colonies due to a syndrome of yet unknown causes. We investigate whether it is associated to pathogenic microorganisms already known to cause disease in bees. These results provide a starting point for future studies aimed at clarifying the relationship between the microbial community of stingless bees and their colony collapses...
November 23, 2016: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886144/cuticular-lipids-as-a-cross-talk-among-ants-plants-and-butterflies
#3
REVIEW
Francesca Barbero
Even though insects and plants are distantly related organisms, they developed an integument which is functionally and structurally similar. Besides functioning as a physical barrier to cope with abiotic and biotic stress, this interface, called cuticle, is also a source of chemical signaling. Crucial compounds with this respect are surface lipids and especially cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs). This review is focused on the role of CHCs in fostering multilevel relationships among ants, plants and Lepidoptera (primarily butterflies)...
November 24, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27878068/genome-methylation-patterns-across-castes-and-generations-in-a-parasitoid-wasp
#4
Roei Shaham, Rachel Ben-Shlomo, Uzi Motro, Tamar Keasar
Environmental influences shape phenotypes within and across generations, often through DNA methylations that modify gene expression. Methylations were proposed to mediate caste and task allocation in some eusocial insects, but how an insect's environment affects DNA methylation in its offspring is yet unknown. We characterized parental effects on methylation profiles in the polyembryonic parasitoid wasp Copidosoma koehleri, as well as methylation patterns associated with its simple caste system. We used methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (MS-AFLP) to compare methylation patterns, among (1) reproductive and soldier larvae; and (2) offspring (larvae, pupae, and adults) of wasps that were reared at either high or low larval density and mated in the four possible combinations...
November 2016: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865886/social-regulation-of-ageing-by-young-workers-in-the-honey-bee-apis-mellifera
#5
Michael Eyer, Benjamin Dainat, Peter Neumann, Vincent Dietemann
Organisms' lifespans are modulated by both genetic and environmental factors. The lifespan of eusocial insects is determined by features of the division of labor, which itself is influenced by social regulatory mechanisms. In the honey bee, Apis mellifera, the presence of brood and of old workers carrying out foraging tasks are important social drivers of ageing, but the influence of young adult workers is unknown, as it has not been experimentally teased apart from that of brood. In this study, we test the role of young workers in the ageing of their nestmates...
November 16, 2016: Experimental Gerontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860522/the-ambrosia-symbiosis-from-evolutionary-ecology-to-practical-management
#6
Jiri Hulcr, Lukasz L Stelinski
The ambrosia beetle-fungus farming symbiosis is more heterogeneous than previously thought. There is not one but many ambrosia symbioses. Beetlefungus specificity is clade-dependent and ranges from strict to promiscuous. Each new origin has evolved a new mycangium. The most common relationship with host trees is colonization of freshly dead tissues, but there are also parasites of living trees, vectors of pathogenic fungi, and beetles living in rotten trees with a wood-decay symbiont. Most of these strategies are driven by fungal metabolism whereas beetle ecology is evolutionarily more flexible...
November 16, 2016: Annual Review of Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27853577/chemical-communication-is-not-sufficient-to-explain-reproductive-inhibition-in-the-bumblebee-bombus-impatiens
#7
Mario Padilla, Etya Amsalem, Naomi Altman, Abraham Hefetz, Christina M Grozinger
Reproductive division of labour is a hallmark of eusociality, but disentangling the underlying proximate mechanisms can be challenging. In bumblebees, workers isolated from the queen can activate their ovaries and lay haploid, male eggs. We investigated if volatile, contact, visual or behavioural cues produced by the queen or brood mediate reproductive dominance in Bombus impatiens. Exposure to queen-produced volatiles, brood-produced volatiles and direct contact with pupae did not reduce worker ovary activation; only direct contact with the queen could reduce ovary activation...
October 2016: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852941/cryptic-lineages-hybridize-for-worker-production-in-the-harvester-ant-messor-barbarus
#8
Victoria Norman, Hugo Darras, Christopher Tranter, Serge Aron, William O H Hughes
The reproductive division of labour between queen and worker castes in social insects is a defining characteristic of eusociality and a classic example of phenotypic plasticity. Whether social insect larvae develop into queens or workers has long been thought to be determined by environmental cues, i.e. larvae are developmentally totipotent. Contrary to this paradigm, several recent studies have revealed that caste is determined by genotype in some ant species, but whether this is restricted to just a few exceptional species is still unclear...
November 2016: Biology Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27847190/comparative-toxicity-of-pesticides-and-environmental-contaminants-in-bees-are-honey-bees-a-useful-proxy-for-wild-bee-species
#9
Matthew S Heard, Jan Baas, Jean-Lou Dorne, Elma Lahive, Alexander G Robinson, Agnes Rortais, David J Spurgeon, Claus Svendsen, Helen Hesketh
Threats to wild and managed insect pollinators in Europe are cause for both ecological and socio-economic concern. Multiple anthropogenic pressures may be exacerbating pollinator declines. One key pressure is exposure to chemicals including pesticides and other contaminants. Historically the honey bee (Apis mellifera spp.) has been used as an 'indicator' species for 'standard' ecotoxicological testing but it has been suggested that it is not always a good proxy for other types of eusocial and solitary bees because of species differences in autecology and sensitivity to various stressors...
November 12, 2016: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27798312/social-complexity-influences-brain-investment-and-neural-operation-costs-in-ants
#10
J Frances Kamhi, Wulfila Gronenberg, Simon K A Robson, James F A Traniello
The metabolic expense of producing and operating neural tissue required for adaptive behaviour is considered a significant selective force in brain evolution. In primates, brain size correlates positively with group size, presumably owing to the greater cognitive demands of complex social relationships in large societies. Social complexity in eusocial insects is also associated with large groups, as well as collective intelligence and division of labour among sterile workers. However, superorganism phenotypes may lower cognitive demands on behaviourally specialized workers resulting in selection for decreased brain size and/or energetic costs of brain metabolism...
October 26, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27796350/opportunistic-brood-theft-in-the-context-of-colony-relocation-in-an-indian-queenless-ant
#11
Bishwarup Paul, Manabi Paul, Sumana Annagiri
Brood is a very valuable part of an ant colony and behaviours increasing its number with minimum investment is expected to be favoured by natural selection. Brood theft has been well documented in ants belonging to the subfamilies Myrmicinae and Formicinae. In this study we report opportunistic brood theft in the context of nest relocation in Diacamma indicum, belonging to the primitively eusocial subfamily Ponerinae. Pupae was the preferred stolen item both in laboratory conditions and in natural habitat and a small percentage of the members of a colony acting as thieves stole about 12% of the brood of the victim colony...
October 31, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27774769/developmental-dna-methyltransferase-expression-in-the-fire-ant-solenopsis-invicta
#12
Sasha Kay, Daniel Skowronski, Brendan G Hunt
DNA methylation is accomplished in animals by two classes of enzymes known as DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3 and DNMT1, which perform de novo methylation and maintenance methylation, respectively. Several studies of hymenopteran eusocial insects suggest that DNA methylation is capable of influencing developmental plasticity. However, fundamental questions remain about the patterning of DNA methylation during the course of insect development. In this study, we performed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) on transcripts from the single-copy orthologs of DNMT1 and DNMT3 in the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta...
October 24, 2016: Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27765943/tissue-developmental-and-caste-specific-expression-of-odorant-binding-proteins-in-a-eusocial-insect-the-red-imported-fire-ant-solenopsis-invicta
#13
Wei Zhang, Arun Wanchoo, Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza, Yuxian Xia, Nemat O Keyhani
Insects interact with the surrounding environment via chemoreception, and in social insects such as ants, chemoreception functions to mediate diverse behaviors including food acquisition, self/non-self recognition, and intraspecific communication. The invasive red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, has spread worldwide, displaying a remarkable environmental adaptability. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are chemical compound carriers, involved in diverse physiological processes including odor detection and chemical transport...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27742474/phylogenomic-analysis-of-yellowjackets-and-hornets-hymenoptera-vespidae-vespinae
#14
Federico Lopez-Osorio, Kurt M Pickett, James M Carpenter, Bryan A Ballif, Ingi Agnarsson
The phylogenetic relationships among genera of the subfamily Vespinae (yellowjackets and hornets) remain unclear. Yellowjackets and hornets constitute one of the only two lineages of highly eusocial wasps, and the distribution of key behavioral traits correlates closely with the current classification of the group. The potential of the Vespinae to elucidate the evolution of social life, however, remains limited due to ambiguous genus-level relationships. Here, we address the relationships among genera within the Vespinae using transcriptomic (RNA-seq) data...
October 11, 2016: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27722875/conservation-of-queen-pheromones-across-two-species-of-vespine-wasps
#15
Cintia A Oi, Jocelyn G Millar, Jelle S van Zweden, Tom Wenseleers
Social insects are known for their reproductive division of labor between queens and workers, whereby queens lay the majority of the colony's eggs, and workers engage mostly in non-reproductive tasks. Queens produce pheromones that signal their presence and fertility to workers, which in turn generally remain sterile. Recently, it has been discovered that specific queen-characteristic cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) function as queen pheromones across multiple lineages of social insects. In the common wasp, Vespula vulgaris, several long-chain linear alkanes and 3-methylalkanes were shown to act as queen signals...
November 2016: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27720058/facultative-social-insects-can-provide-insights-into-the-reversal-of-the-longevity-fecundity-trade-off-across-the-eusocial-insects
#16
Alice Séguret, Abel Bernadou, Robert J Paxton
In eusocial insects, reversal of the fecundity/longevity trade-off and extreme differences in life histories between castes of the same species garner scientific and public interest. Facultative social species at the threshold of sociality, in which individuals are socially plastic, provide an excellent opportunity to understand the causes and mechanisms underlying this reversal in life history trade-off associated with eusociality. We briefly present the ultimate factors favoring sociality and the association between fecundity and longevity in facultative eusocial insects, including kin selection and disposable soma, as well as proximate mechanisms observed in such species, such as differences in hormone titers and functions...
August 2016: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27720054/lifespan-divergence-between-social-insect-castes-challenges-and-opportunities-for-evolutionary-theories-of-aging
#17
Boris H Kramer, G Sander van Doorn, Franz J Weissing, Ido Pen
The extraordinarily long lifespans of queens (and kings) in eusocial insects and the strikingly large differences in life expectancy between workers and queens challenge our understanding of the evolution of aging and provide unique opportunities for studying the causes underlying adaptive variation in lifespan within species. Here we review the major evolutionary theories of aging, focusing on their scope and limitations when applied to social insects. We show that reproductive division of labor, interactions between kin, caste-specific gene regulation networks, and the integration of colony-level trade-offs with individual-level trade-offs provide challenges to the classical theories We briefly indicate how these challenges could be met in future models of adaptive phenotypic plasticity in lifespan between and within different castes...
August 2016: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27720053/a-critical-look-at-proximate-causes-of-social-insect-senescence-damage-accumulation-or-hyperfunction
#18
Jane de Verges, Volker Nehring
Social insects have received attention for their extreme lifespan variation and reversal of the fecundity/longevity trade-off. However, proximate causes of senescence in general are disputed, and social insects often fail to meet the predictions of prevailing models. We present evidence for and against the long-held free radical theory of aging in social insects, and consider the application of the competing hyperfunction theory. Current results present problems for both theories, and a more complex picture of the biological processes involved emerges...
August 2016: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27720047/patterns-of-longevity-across-a-sociality-gradient-in-vespid-wasps
#19
Amy L Toth, Seirian Sumner, Robert L Jeanne
The reversal of the fecundity/longevity tradeoff in social insects is striking, but we lack understanding of when and how this reversal evolved. Vespid wasps are excellent models for studying social evolution because species show different levels of sociality from solitary to primitively to advanced eusocial. We provide the first synthesis of existing, but scanty, data available on longevity in vespids. We explore whether the fecundity/longevity tradeoff reversal is exaggerated in species with more derived sociality...
August 2016: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27720042/endocrine-uncoupling-of-the-trade-off-between-reproduction-and-somatic-maintenance-in-eusocial-insects
#20
Marisa A Rodrigues, Thomas Flatt
In most animals reproduction trades off with somatic maintenance and survival. Physiologically this trade-off is mediated by hormones with opposite effects on reproduction and maintenance. In many insects, this regulation is achieved by an endocrine network that integrates insulin-like/IGF-1 signaling (IIS), juvenile hormone (JH), and the yolk precursor vitellogenin (Vg) (or, more generally, yolk proteins [YPs]). Downregulation of this network promotes maintenance and survival at the expense of reproduction...
August 2016: Current Opinion in Insect Science
keyword
keyword
99834
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"