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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29208229/pheromones-involved-in-insect-parental-care-and-family-life
#1
REVIEW
Sandra Steiger, Johannes Stökl
Effective parental care requires recognition and communication processes. Whereas chemical communication has been studied intensively in eusocial organisms, in which the workers (siblings) predominantly provide brood care, insect groups in which parents engage in care have been largely neglected. However, the study of communication in insect families might complement and enhance our understanding not only of the evolution of signaling process involved in social insects, but also of those involved in vertebrate families...
December 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29163007/from-mice-to-mole-rats-species-specific-modulation-of-adult-hippocampal-neurogenesis
#2
Maria K Oosthuizen
Rodent populations living in their natural environments have very diverse ecological and life history profiles that may differ substantially from that of conventional laboratory rodents. Free-living rodents show species-specific neurogenesis that are dependent on their unique biology and ecology. This perspective aims to illustrate the benefit of studying wild rodent species in conjunction with laboratory rodents. African mole-rats are discussed in terms of habitat complexity, social structures, and longevity...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29160553/the-evolutionary-dynamics-of-adaptive-virginity-sex-allocation-and-altruistic-helping-in-haplodiploid-animals
#3
Petri Rautiala, Heikki Helanterä, Mikael Puurtinen
In haplodiploids, females can produce sons from unfertilized eggs without mating. However, virgin reproduction is usually considered to be a result of a failure to mate, rather than an adaptation. Here we build an analytical model for evolution of virgin reproduction, sex-allocation, and altruistic female helping in haplodiploid taxa. We show that when mating is costly (e.g. when mating increases predation risk), virginity can evolve as an adaptive female reproductive strategy. Furthermore, adaptive virginity results in strongly divergent sex-ratios in mated and virgin queen nests ('split sex ratios'), which promotes the evolution of altruistic helping by daughters in mated queen nests...
November 21, 2017: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29147977/are-isomeric-alkenes-used-in-species-recognition-among-neo-tropical-stingless-bees-melipona-spp
#4
Stephen J Martin, Sue Shemilt, Cândida B da S Lima, Carlos A L de Carvalho
Our understanding of the role of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC) in recognition is based largely on temperate ant species and honey bees. The stingless bees remain relatively poorly studied, despite being the largest group of eusocial bees, comprising more than 400 species in some 60 genera. The Meliponini and Apini diverged between 80-130 Myr B.P. so the evolutionary trajectories that shaped the chemical communication systems in ants, honeybees and stingless bees may be very different. The aim of this study was to study if a unique species CHC signal existed in Neotropical stingless bees, as has been shown for many temperate species, and what compounds are involved...
November 17, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29113015/subfamily-dependent-alternative-reproductive-strategies-in-worker-honey-bees
#5
Boris Yagound, Michael Duncan, Nadine C Chapman, Benjamin P Oldroyd
Functional worker sterility is the defining feature of insect societies. Yet, workers are sometimes found reproducing in their own or foreign colonies. The proximate mechanisms underlying these alternative reproductive phenotypes are key to understanding how reproductive altruism and selfishness are balanced in eusocial insects. In this study we show that in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies the social environment of a worker, i.e. the presence and relatedness of the queens in a worker's natal colony and in surrounding colonies, significantly influences her fertility and drifting behaviour...
November 7, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29102645/caste-differences-in-the-association-between-dopamine-and-reproduction-in-the-bumble-bee-bombus-ignitus
#6
Ken Sasaki, Hinako Matsuyama, Naruaki Morita, Masato Ono
A society of bumble bees is primitively eusocial, with an annual life cycle, and can be used as a physiological model of social bees for comparative studies with highly eusocial hymenopterans. We investigated the dynamics of biogenic amine levels in the brain, meso-metathoracic ganglia, terminal abdominal ganglion, and hemolymph in queens 1 day after mating (1DAM), during diapause (Dp), and during colony founding (CF) in the bumble bee, Bombus ignitus. Dopamine levels in the brain of CF queens were significantly lower than in 1DAM and Dp queens, and the levels in the thoracic ganglia and hemolymph in CF queens were lower than in 1DAM queens, but did not differ from other groups in the abdominal ganglion...
November 2, 2017: Journal of Insect Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29089938/evidence-for-widespread-associations-between-neotropical-hymenopteran-insects-and-actinobacteria
#7
Bernal Matarrita-Carranza, Rolando D Moreira-Soto, Catalina Murillo-Cruz, Marielos Mora, Cameron R Currie, Adrián A Pinto-Tomas
The evolutionary success of hymenopteran insects has been associated with complex physiological and behavioral defense mechanisms against pathogens and parasites. Among these strategies are symbiotic associations between Hymenoptera and antibiotic-producing Actinobacteria, which provide protection to insect hosts. Herein, we examine associations between culturable Actinobacteria and 29 species of tropical hymenopteran insects that span five families, including Apidae (bees), Vespidae (wasps), and Formicidae (ants)...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078289/divergence-of-developmental-trajectories-is-triggered-interactively-by-early-social-and-ecological-experience-in-a-cooperative-breeder
#8
Stefan Fischer, Lena Bohn, Evelyne Oberhummer, Cecilia Nyman, Barbara Taborsky
Cooperative breeders feature the highest level of social complexity among vertebrates. Environmental constraints foster the evolution of this form of social organization, selecting for both well-developed social and ecological competences. Cooperative breeders pursue one of two alternative social trajectories: delaying reproduction to care for the offspring of dominant breeders or dispersing early to breed independently. It is yet unclear which ecological and social triggers determine the choice between these alternatives and whether diverging developmental trajectories exist in cooperative vertebrates predisposing them to dispersal or philopatry...
October 31, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29075460/the-evolution-of-queen-control-over-worker-reproduction-in-the-social-hymenoptera
#9
Jason Olejarz, Carl Veller, Martin A Nowak
A trademark of eusocial insect species is reproductive division of labor, in which workers forego their own reproduction while the queen produces almost all offspring. The presence of the queen is key for maintaining social harmony, but the specific role of the queen in the evolution of eusociality remains unclear. A long-discussed scenario is that a queen either behaviorally or chemically sterilizes her workers. However, the demographic and ecological conditions that enable such manipulation are still debated...
October 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29066958/origins-of-aminergic-regulation-of-behavior-in-complex-insect-social-systems
#10
J Frances Kamhi, Sara Arganda, Corrie S Moreau, James F A Traniello
Neuromodulators are conserved across insect taxa, but how biogenic amines and their receptors in ancestral solitary forms have been co-opted to control behaviors in derived socially complex species is largely unknown. Here we explore patterns associated with the functions of octopamine (OA), serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) in solitary ancestral insects and their derived functions in eusocial ants, bees, wasps and termites. Synthesizing current findings that reveal potential ancestral roles of monoamines in insects, we identify physiological processes and conserved behaviors under aminergic control, consider how biogenic amines may have evolved to modulate complex social behavior, and present focal research areas that warrant further study...
2017: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29062138/increased-complexity-of-mushroom-body-kenyon-cell-subtypes-in-the-brain-is-associated-with-behavioral-evolution-in-hymenopteran-insects
#11
Satoyo Oya, Hiroki Kohno, Yooichi Kainoh, Masato Ono, Takeo Kubo
In insect brains, the mushroom bodies (MBs) are a higher-order center for sensory integration and memory. Honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) MBs comprise four Kenyon cell (KC) subtypes: class I large-, middle-, and small-type, and class II KCs, which are distinguished by the size and location of somata, and gene expression profiles. Although these subtypes have only been reported in the honeybee, the time of their acquisition during evolution remains unknown. Here we performed in situ hybridization of tachykinin-related peptide, which is differentially expressed among KC subtypes in the honeybee MBs, in four hymenopteran species to analyze whether the complexity of KC subtypes is associated with their behavioral traits...
October 23, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29021562/the-sex-pheromone-of-a-globally-invasive-honey-bee-predator-the-asian-eusocial-hornet-vespa-velutina
#12
Ping Wen, Ya-Nan Cheng, Shi-Hao Dong, Zheng-Wei Wang, Ken Tan, James C Nieh
The Asian hornet, Vespa velutina, is an invasive, globally-distributed predator of European honey bees and other insects. To better under its reproductive biology and to find a specific, effective, and low-impact control method for this species, we identified and tested the key compounds in V. velutina sex pheromone. Virgin gynes (reproductive females) produced this sex pheromone in the sixth intersegmental sternal glands of their abdomens. The active compounds were 4-oxo-octanoic acid (4-OOA, 10.4 μg bee(-1)) and 4-oxo-decanoic acid (4-ODA, 13...
October 11, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28981168/delayed-dispersal-and-prolonged-brood-care-in-a-family-living-beetle
#13
Jacqueline R Dillard, Thomas A Maigret
Delayed juvenile dispersal is an important prerequisite for the evolution of family-based social systems, such as cooperative breeding and eusociality. In general, young adults forego dispersal if there are substantial benefits to remaining in the natal nest and/or the likelihood of dispersing and breeding successfully is low. We investigate some general factors thought to drive delayed juvenile dispersal in the horned passalus beetle, a family-living beetle in which young adults remain with their families in their natal nest for several months before dispersing...
October 5, 2017: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28973493/survey-of-hatching-spines-of-bee-larvae-including-those-of-apis-mellifera-hymenoptera-apoidea
#14
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Jerome G Rozen, Corey Shepard Smith, James H Cane
This article explores the occurrence of hatching spines among bee taxa and how these structures enable a larva on hatching to extricate itself from the egg chorion. These spines, arranged in a linear sequence along the sides of the first instar just dorsal to the spiracles, have been observed and recorded in certain groups of solitary and cleptoparasitic bee taxa. After eclosion, the first instar remains loosely covered by the egg chorion. The fact that this form of eclosion has been detected in five families (Table 1 identifies four of the families...
July 1, 2017: Journal of Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28961457/evolutionary-processes-in-suicide
#15
REVIEW
Bruno Chiurliza, Megan L Rogers, Matthew E Schneider, Carol Chu, Thomas E Joiner
Suicidal behavior contains several dynamic elements. Due to its complexity, empirical science may approach suicide through various avenues. One underutilized approach is taking an evolutionary perspective. Our review of the literature presents two evolutionary processes that may be implicated in suicidal behavior, namely eusocial behavior and antipredator response behaviors. Studies have indicated that aspects of suicidal behavior parallel self-sacrificial behavior in eusocial animals, and that systems similar to hyperarousal-shutdown systems involved in antipredator behaviors may be activated among suicidal individuals...
September 14, 2017: Current Opinion in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28957466/queens-and-workers-contribute-differently-to-adaptive-evolution-in-bumble-bees-and-honey-bees
#16
Brock A Harpur, Alivia Dey, Jennifer R Albert, Sani Patel, Heather M Hines, Martin Hasselmann, Laurence Packer, Amro Zayed
Eusociality represents a major transition in evolution and is typified by cooperative brood care and reproductive division of labor between generations. In bees, this division of labor allows queens and workers to phenotypically specialize. Worker traits associated with helping are thought to be crucial to the fitness of a eusocial lineage, and recent studies of honey bees (genus Apis) have found that adaptively evolving genes often have worker-biased expression patterns. It is unclear however if worker-biased genes are disproportionately acted on by strong positive selection in all eusocial insects...
September 1, 2017: Genome Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28950481/trophallaxis-inspired-model-for-distributed-transport-between-randomly-interacting-agents
#17
Johannes Gräwer, Henrik Ronellenfitsch, Marco G Mazza, Eleni Katifori
Trophallaxis, the regurgitation and mouth to mouth transfer of liquid food between members of eusocial insect societies, is an important process that allows the fast and efficient dissemination of food in the colony. Trophallactic systems are typically treated as a network of agent interactions. This approach, though valuable, does not easily lend itself to analytic predictions. In this work we consider a simple trophallactic system of randomly interacting agents with finite carrying capacity, and calculate analytically and via a series of simulations the global food intake rate for the whole colony as well as observables describing how uniformly the food is distributed within the nest...
August 2017: Physical Review. E
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941994/the-microrna-ame-mir-279a-regulates-sucrose-responsiveness-of%C3%A2-forager-honey-bees-apis-mellifera
#18
Fang Liu, Tengfei Shi, Wei Yin, Xin Su, Lei Qi, Zachary Y Huang, Shaowu Zhang, Linsheng Yu
Increasing evidence demonstrates that microRNAs (miRNA) play an important role in the regulation of animal behaviours. Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are eusocial insects, with honey bee workers displaying age-dependent behavioural maturation. Many different miRNAs have been implicated in the change of behaviours in honey bees and ame-miR-279a was previously shown to be more highly expressed in nurse bee heads than in those of foragers. However, it was not clear whether this difference in expression was associated with age or task performance...
November 2017: Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28940239/allee-effects-in-social-species
#19
REVIEW
E Angulo, G Luque, S D Gregory, J W Wenzel, C Bessa-Gomes, L Berec, F Courchamp
Allee effects have important implications for many aspects of basic and applied ecology. The benefits of aggregation of conspecific individuals are central to Allee effects, which have led to the widely held assumption that social species are more prone to Allee effects. Robust evidence for this assumption, however, remains rare. Further, previous research on Allee effects has failed to adequately address the consequences of the different levels of organization within social species' populations. Here, we review available evidence of Allee effects and model the role of demographic and behavioural factors that may combine to dampen or strengthen Allee effects in social species...
September 20, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28936978/advances-on-polyphenism-in-insects
#20
Xian-Ci Xue, Li Yu
Polyphenism denotes that one genome produces two or more distinct phenotypes due to environmental inductions. Many cases have been reported in insects, for example, metamorphosis, seasonal polyphenism, the caste of eusocial insects and so on. Polyphenism is one of the most important reasons for insects to survive and thrive, because insects can adapt and use the environmental cues around them in order to avoid predators and reproduce by changing their phenotypes. Polyphenism has received growing attentions, ranging from the earlier description of this phenomenon to the exploration of possible inducing factors...
September 20, 2017: Yi Chuan, Hereditas
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