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Sleep deprivation

V M Kovalzon, L S Moiseenko, A V Ambaryan, S Kurtenbach, V I Shestopalov, Y V Panchin
Pannexins are membrane channel proteins that play a role in a number of critical biological processes (Panchin et al., 2000; Shestopalov, Panchin, 2008). Among other cellular functions, pannexin hemichannels serve as purine nucleoside conduits providing ATP efflux into the extracellular space (Dahl, 2015), where it is rapidly degraded to adenosine. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is abundantly expressed in the brain and has been shown to contribute to adenosine signaling in nervous system tissues (Prochnow, 2012)...
October 18, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Rohit Marawar, Hsiang J Yeh, Chris Carnabatu, John M Stern
INTRODUCTION: The EEG rhythms demonstrate changes in frequency and power with spontaneous changes in behavioral state that do not have well understood metabolic correlates within the brain. To investigate this question and compare the temporal lobe theta and delta rhythms, resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) was obtained with simultaneous EEG. METHODS: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was recorded from 14 healthy, sleep-deprived subjects in awake and drowsy states. Scalp electrodes corresponding to bilateral temporal lobes were used to calculate delta and theta band power...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society
Brice Faraut, Thomas Andrillon, Marie-Françoise Vecchierini, Damien Leger
Sleep specialists have proposed measures to counteract the negative short- and long-term consequences of sleep debt, and some have suggested the nap as a potential and powerful "public health tool". Here, we address this countermeasure aspect of napping viewed as an action against sleep deprivation rather than an action associated with poor health. We review the physiological functions that have been associated positively with napping in both public health and clinical settings (sleep-related accidents, work and school, and cardiovascular risk) and in laboratory-based studies with potential public health issues (cognitive performance, stress, immune function and pain sensitivity)...
September 13, 2016: Sleep Medicine Reviews
Timo-Kolja Pförtner, Irene Moor
Background: The relationship between socioeconomic status and health is explained by the unequal distribution of material, psychosocial and behavioral factors. The aim of this study is to analyze the relative contribution of these factors for the association between income and different indicators of health and diseases. Method: Analyses were based on data from the "German Socioeconomic Panel (GSOEP)" in 2011. We estimated the relative contribution of material, psychosocial and behavioral factors in income-related inequalities in health by logistic mediator analyses focusing on following outcomes: self-rated health, diabetes, cardiac disease, sleep disorder, joint diseases, depression and chronical back trouble...
October 17, 2016: Psychotherapie, Psychosomatik, Medizinische Psychologie
Harini C Krishnan, Catherine E Gandour, Joshua L Ramos, Mariah C Wrinkle, Joseph J Sanchez-Pacheco, Lisa C Lyons
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Insufficient sleep in individuals appears increasingly common due to the demands of modern work schedules and technology use. Consequently, there is a growing need to understand the interactions between sleep deprivation and memory. The current study determined the effects of acute sleep deprivation on short- and long-term associative memory using the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, a relatively simple model system well known for studies of learning and memory. DESIGN: Aplysia were sleep deprived for 9 h using context changes and tactile stimulation prior to or after training using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible (LFI)...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Eric Murillo-Rodríguez, Sergio Machado, Nuno Barbosa Rocha, Henning Budde, Ti-Fei Yuan, Oscar Arias-Carrión
The endocannabinoid system comprises receptors (CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors), enzymes (Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase [FAAH], which synthesizes the endocannabinoid anandamide), as well as the anandamide membrane transporter (AMT). Importantly, previous experiments have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system modulates multiple neurobiological functions, including sleep. For instance, SR141716A (the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist) as well as URB597 (the FAAH inhibitor) increase waking in rats whereas VDM-11 (the blocker of the AMT) enhances sleep in rodents...
October 13, 2016: Neuroscience
Dr T J Lasisi, S T Shittu, C C Meludu, A A Salami
OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation on salivary factors in rats. DESIGN: Animals were randomly assigned into three groups of 6 animals each as control, total sleep deprivation (TSD) and partial sleep deprivation (PSD) groups. The multiple platform method was used to induce partial and total sleep deprivation for 7days. On the 8th day, stimulated saliva samples were collected for the analysis of salivary lag time, flow rate, salivary amylase activity, immunoglobulin A secretion rate and corticosterone levels using ELISA and standard kinetic enzyme assay...
September 26, 2016: Archives of Oral Biology
Lengqiu Guo, Zhuangli Guo, Xiaoqing Luo, Rui Liang, Shui Yang, Haigang Ren, Guanghui Wang, Xuechu Zhen
Sleep, particularly rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, is implicated in the consolidation of emotional memories. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of a phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitor MP-10 on deficits in long-term fear memory induced by REM sleep deprivation (REM-SD). REM-SD caused deficits in long-term fear memory, however, MP-10 administration ameliorated the deleterious effects of REM-SD on long term fear memory. Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) were altered in specific brain regions associated with learning and memory in REM-SD rats...
October 12, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Valeriy A Poroyko, Alba Carreras, Abdelnaby Khalyfa, Ahamed A Khalyfa, Vanessa Leone, Eduard Peris, Isaac Almendros, Alex Gileles-Hillel, Zhuanhong Qiao, Nathaniel Hubert, Ramon Farré, Eugene B Chang, David Gozal
Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) commonly occurs in human populations, and although it does not involve circadian shifts or sleep deprivation, it markedly alters feeding behaviors ultimately promoting obesity and insulin resistance. These symptoms are known to be related to the host gut microbiota. Mice were exposed to SF for 4 weeks and then allowed to recover for 2 weeks. Taxonomic profiles of fecal microbiota were obtained prospectively, and conventionalization experiments were performed in germ-free mice...
October 14, 2016: Scientific Reports
Xiaowen Xu, Liang Wang, Yan Zhang, Tianjiao Su, Liying Chen, Yan Zhang, Weifeng Ma, Yuanyuan Xie, Tiantian Wang, Fan Yang, Li He, Wenjiao Wang, Xuemei Fu, Hongxia Hao, Yuanzheng Ma
Epidemiological studies have shown that chronic sleep disturbances resulted in metabolic disorders. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between chronic sleep deprivation (CSD) and the glucose homeostasis in rats. Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into CSD group and control (CON) group. The CSD rats were intervened by a modified multiple platform method (MMPM) to establish an animal model of chronic sleep disturbances. After 3-month intervention, all rats were subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) and an insulin tolerance test (ITT), and the body weight, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine, lipid profile group, and homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) were measured...
2016: Sleep and Biological Rhythms
Emel Oğuz-Akarsu, Zeynep Aydin-Özemir, Nerses Bebek, Candan Gürses, Ayşen Gökyiğit, Betül Baykan
Status epilepticus (SE) is rarely described in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), and little is known about its frequency, subtypes, and predictors and the prognosis of these patients. In this retrospective study, we aimed to analyze the incidence of SE in patients with JME and emphasize the risk factors and long-term outcome of SE in an epilepsy outpatient-based cohort. We included patients with JME with a history of predominant myoclonic seizures and at least one diagnostic EEG with normal background activity and bursts of typical ≥3-Hz generalized spike-polyspike and waves...
October 10, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Idan Elbaz, David Zada, Adi Tovin, Tslil Braun, Tali Lerer-Goldshtein, Gordon Wang, Philippe Mourrain, Lior Appelbaum
Sleep is tightly regulated by the circadian clock and homeostatic mechanisms. Although the sleep/wake cycle is known to be associated with structural and physiological synaptic changes that benefit the brain, the function of sleep is still debated. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate various functions including feeding, reward, sleep, and wake. Continuous imaging of single neuronal circuits in live animals is vital to understanding the role of sleep in regulating synaptic dynamics, and the transparency of the zebrafish model enables time-lapse imaging of single synapses during both day and night...
October 12, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Arcady A Putilov, Olga G Donskaya, Evgeniy G Verevkin
One of the critical barriers to reducing the threats of sleep loss to public health, safety, and productivity is a lack of practical tools for quick identification of objective level of sleepiness. We examined a novel sleepiness measure named "spectral drowsy component score" to provide evidence for generalizability of a frequency weighting curve required for calculation of this measure. Each spectral drowsy component score is a sum of 16 weighted ln-transformed single-Hz power densities (1-16 Hz) obtained by the fast Fourier transformation of an electroencephalographic signal recorded during the first minute after closing the eyes...
October 11, 2016: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience: Official Journal of the EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ENCS)
Xinqi Zhou, Taoyu Wu, Jing Yu, Xu Lei
Accumulating evidence supports that sleep deprivation (SD) and aging have similar effects: decreased cognition performance and impaired brain function. Some investigators even proposed the SD as a model of aging. However, few direct comparisons were ever explored between the effects of SD and aging by network module analysis with the resting-state fMRI. In this study, both within- and between-module connectivities were calculated in the whole brain to describe a complete picture of brain networks' functional connectivity among three groups (young normal sleep, young SD and old group)...
October 12, 2016: Brain Connectivity
Fabianne Furtado, Bruno da Silva B Gonçalves, Isabela Lopes Laguardia Abranches, Ana Flávia Abrantes, Arturo Forner-Cordero
The lack of sleep, both in quality and quantity, is an increasing problem in modern society, often related to workload and stress. A number of studies have addressed the effects of acute (total) sleep deprivation on postural control. However, up to date, the effects of chronic sleep deficits, either in quantity or quality, have not been analyzed. Thirty healthy adults participated in the study that consisted of registering activity with a wrist actigraph for more than a week before performing a series of postural control tests...
2016: PloS One
S Cohen, G Ifergane, E Vainer, M A Matar, Z Kaplan, J Zohar, A A Mathé, H Cohen
Pharmacotherapeutic intervention during traumatic memory consolidation has been suggested to alleviate or even prevent the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We recently reported that, in a controlled, prospective animal model, depriving rats of sleep following stress exposure prevents the development of a PTSD-like phenotype. Here, we report that administering the wake-promoting drug modafinil to rats in the aftermath of a stressogenic experience has a similar prophylactic effect, as it significantly reduces the prevalence of PTSD-like phenotype...
October 11, 2016: Translational Psychiatry
Lisa Caulley, Alexandra E Quimby, Nick Barrowman, Katherine Moreau, Jean-Philippe Vaccani
OBJECTIVE: To inform institutional policies regarding call encounters through an evaluation of the effect of home-call on academic experience and fatigue among surgical residents. This study conducted an assessment of the nature of resident call encounters premidnight and postmidnight and a comparative analysis of sleep deprivation and efficiency in residents during home-call and off call. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: All Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residents (n = 9) at single Canadian institution were asked to establish the time and nature of call encounters during home-call...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Surgical Education
Jacques Theitler, Daniella Dassa, Revital Gandelman-Marton
BACKGROUND: The electroencephalogram (EEG) can support the diagnosis of epilepsy, diagnose nonconvulsive status epilepticus, and aid in the classification of epileptic seizures. Its contribution to the diagnosis of other medical conditions or to decision making in other clinical situations was not established. Practically, EEG labs frequently encounter EEG referrals that are not based on current recommendations. OBJECTIVES: To assess the value of inpatient EEG in medical decision making...
October 6, 2016: European Journal of Clinical Investigation
Salome Kurth, Douglas C Dean, Peter Achermann, Jonathan O'Muircheartaigh, Reto Huber, Sean C L Deoni, Monique K LeBourgeois
Brain networks respond to sleep deprivation or restriction with increased sleep depth, which is quantified as slow-wave activity (SWA) in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). When adults are sleep deprived, this homeostatic response is most pronounced over prefrontal brain regions. However, it is unknown how children's developing brain networks respond to acute sleep restriction, and whether this response is linked to myelination, an ongoing process in childhood that is critical for brain development and cortical integration...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Christopher J Davis, Ping Taishi, Kimberly A Honn, John N Koberstein, James M Krueger
The ionotropic purine type 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a non-specific cation channel implicated in sleep regulation and brain cytokine release. Many endogenous rhythms co-vary with sleep including locomotor activity and core body temperature. Further, brain-hypothalamic cytokines and purines play a role in the regulation of these physiological parameters as well as sleep. We hypothesized that these parameters are also affected by the absence of the P2X7 receptor. Herein we determine spontaneous expression of body temperature and locomotor activity in WT and P2X7R knockout (KO) mice and how they are affected by sleep deprivation (SD)...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
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