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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29873077/anatomical-subsite-can-modify-the-association-between-meat-and-meat-compounds-and-risk-of-colorectal-adenocarcinoma-findings-from-three-large-us-cohorts
#1
Arash Etemadi, Christian C Abnet, Barry I Graubard, Laura Beane- Freeman, Neal D Freedman, Linda Liao, Sanford M Dawsey, Rashmi Sinha
Distal and proximal colon tumors have distinct incidence trends and embryonic origins; whether these sub-sites have distinct susceptibilities to known risk factors is unclear. We used pooled data from 407,270 participants in three US-based studies, with overall median follow-up of 13.8 years. We used adjusted Cox models to analyze the association between dietary intakes (from diet history questionnaire) of total, processed and unprocessed red meat; total white meat, poultry and fish; and meat-related compounds: heme iron, nitrate, nitrite, the heterocyclic amines (HCAs), and benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and incidence of colorectal cancer subsites...
June 6, 2018: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29860978/characterization-of-the-degree-of-food-processing-in-relation-with-its-health-potential-and-effects
#2
Anthony Fardet
Up today technological processes are intended to produce safe and palatable food products. Yet, it is also expected that processing produces healthy and sustainable foods. However, due to the dramatic increase of chronic diseases prevalence worldwide, i.e., obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and some cancers, ultraprocessing has been pointed out as producing unhealthy foods, rich in energy and poor in protective micronutrients and fiber, i.e., "empty" calories. Indeed the 1980s saw massive arrivals of ultraprocessed foods in supermarkets, i...
2018: Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29860769/-screening-results-and-influencing-factors-of-upper-gastrointestinal-carcinoma-and-precancerous-lesions-in-feicheng-city
#3
Q H Li, C Y Yin, H B Li, Y Sun, Y X Wang, F Liu, X H Guo, G Q Wang, W Wang
Objective: To clarify the situation of the detection of upper gastrointestinal cancer and precancerous lesions in the Feicheng city and discuss the possible influencing factors. Methods: A cluster sampling method was used to determine the participants. A unified questionnaire was used to investigate the basic information including history of alcohol intake, smoking and chinese tea, as well as other eating habits, medical history of digestive tract and cancer. Endoscopy was used to to screen the patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer and precancerous lesions...
May 23, 2018: Zhonghua Zhong Liu za Zhi [Chinese Journal of Oncology]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29857891/dietary-sources-of-iron-and-vitamin-b12-is-this-the-missing-link-in-colorectal-carcinogenesis
#4
I Banjari, A Hjartåker
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is distinctive for its strikingly high correlation with the diet. Heme-iron from red and processed meat was found to strongly increase the risk of CRC, yet only 20% of the total dietary iron is heme-iron. However, the results are still inconclusive in terms of the total dietary iron and CRC risk. On the other hand, vitamin B12 has been proposed as cytoprotector, and iron and vitamin B12 share their dietary sources. Meat and animal-derived products are the only foods that naturally provide vitamin B12...
July 2018: Medical Hypotheses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29848668/dietary-patterns-and-breast-cancer-risk-a-systematic-review
#5
REVIEW
Akhila Dandamudi, Jessie Tommie, Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, Sarah Couch
BACKGROUND/AIM: The association of dietary patterns representing multiple dietary components and breast cancer risk is not clearly understood. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review of the association between dietary patterns and breast cancer risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The original articles included, were published between January 2013 and May 2017 and characterized diets using a priori and posteriori approaches to examine associations between dietary patterns and breast cancer risk...
June 2018: Anticancer Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29847592/dietary-habits-in-adolescence-and-midlife-and-risk-of-breast-cancer-in-older-women
#6
Alfheidur Haraldsdottir, Johanna E Torfadottir, Unnur A Valdimarsdottir, Hans-Olov Adami, Thor Aspelund, Laufey Tryggvadottir, Marianna Thordardottir, Bryndis E Birgisdottir, Tamara B Harris, Lenore J Launer, Vilmundur Gudnason, Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Recent studies indicate that lifestyle factors in early life affect breast cancer risk. We therefore explored the association of high consumption of meat, milk, and whole grain products in adolescence and midlife, on breast cancer risk. We used data from the population based AGES-Reykjavik cohort (2002-2006), where 3,326 women with a mean age of 77 years (SD 6.0) participated. For food items and principal component derived dietary patterns we used Cox proportional models to calculate multivariate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI)...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29813139/things-we-do-for-no-reason-neutropenic-diet
#7
Heather R Wolfe, Navid Sadeghi, Deepak Agrawal, David H Johnson, Arjun Gupta
For several decades, providers have routinely restricted the diets of neutropenic cancer patients by eliminating foods that might harbor pathogenic microbes to reduce infection rates. These diets, known as neutropenic or low-bacteria diets, are prescribed across the country with little uniformity in the extent or content of prescription. These diets are difficult to follow and force patients to omit fresh fruits and vegetables and limit dairy and meat products from their diet. These dietary omissions compromise nutritional intake in patients who are already at high risk of malnutrition...
May 30, 2018: Journal of Hospital Medicine: An Official Publication of the Society of Hospital Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29796113/dietary-and-genetic-risk-scores-and-incidence-of-type-2-diabetes
#8
Ulrika Ericson, George Hindy, Isabel Drake, Christina-Alexandra Schulz, Louise Brunkwall, Sophie Hellstrand, Peter Almgren, Marju Orho-Melander
Background: Both lifestyle and genetic predisposition determine the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and studies have indicated interactions between specific dietary components and individual genetic variants. However, it is unclear whether the importance of overall dietary habits, including T2D-related food intakes, differs depending on genetic predisposition to T2D. We examined interaction between a genetic risk score for T2D, constructed from 48 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies, and a diet risk score of four foods consistently associated with T2D in epidemiological studies (processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, whole grain and coffee)...
2018: Genes & Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29793493/hypothesis-and-data-driven-dietary-patterns-and-colorectal-cancer-survival-findings-from-newfoundland-and-labrador-colorectal-cancer-cohort
#9
Ishor Sharma, Barbara Roebothan, Yun Zhu, Jennifer Woodrow, Patrick S Parfrey, John R Mclaughlin, Peter Peizhong Wang
BACKGROUND: Dietary patterns are commonly used in epidemiological research, yet there have been few studies assessing if and how research results may vary across dietary patterns. This study aimed to estimate the risk of mortality/recurrence/metastasis using different dietary patterns and comparison amongst the patterns. METHODS: Dietary patterns were identified by Cluster Analysis (CA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Alternate Mediterranean Diet score (altMED), Recommended Food Score (RFS) and Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) scores using a 169-item food frequency questionnaire...
May 25, 2018: Nutrition Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29786804/-protein-deficiency-a-rare-nutrient-deficiency
#10
Gunnar Johansson
There is a widespread myth that we have to be careful about what we eat so that we do not cause protein deficiency. We know today that it is virtually impossible to design a calorie-sufficient diet, whether it is based on meat, fish, eggs, various vegetarian diets or even unprocessed whole natural plant foods, which is lacking in protein and any of the amino acids. The body is capable of taking incomplete proteins and making them complete by utilizing the amino acid recycling mechanism. The majority of amino acids absorbed from the intestinal tract are derived from recycled body protein...
May 21, 2018: Läkartidningen
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29768948/late-effect-of-the-food-consumption-on-colorectal-cancer-rate
#11
Maryam Ganjavi, Bahram Faraji
Studies have suggested that higher meat intake may increase colorectal cancer (CRC) risk while higher vegetable intake may reduce this risk. There is a substantial lag between the time of exposure to a risk factor (or protective factor) and incidence of cancer. For CRC, in particular, the time from formation of adenoma to occurrence of CRC takes from 10 to 15 years, or even more. This study correlates food disappearance data per capita for vegetable and meat with future age-adjusted CRC rates in USA. The lag weights, with a high confidence, showed that there is a positive correlation between the red meat availability and CRC age-adjusted incidence rates with a lag of at least 17 years and an Almon polynomial degree of 2...
May 17, 2018: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29766696/dietary-practices-and-nutritional-status-in-survivors-of-breast-cancer
#12
Emilia Kałędkiewicz, Dorota Szostak-Węgierek
Background: Wrong dietary practices and excessive body mass may not only influence the risk of primary breast cancer but also the risk of its recurrence. Objective: Evaluation of dietary practices and identification of nutritional factors which may influence the risk of tumor recurrence in women with prior breast cancer. Materials and methods: The case-control study involved 108 women aged 50 years and older with history of breast cancer who were divided into two categories: women after completed cancer treatment with no recurrence for minimum 5 years (group I, n=82) and women with diagnosed breast cancer recurrence (group II, n=26)...
2018: Roczniki Państwowego Zakładu Higieny
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29763272/colorectal-cancer-screening-and-prevention
#13
Thad Wilkins, Danielle McMechan, Asif Talukder
Colorectal cancer is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Most colorectal cancers arise from preexisting adenomatous or serrated polyps. The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer can be reduced with screening of average-risk adults 50 to 75 years of age. Randomized controlled trials show evidence of reduced colorectal cancer-specific mortality with guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests and flexible sigmoidoscopy. There are no randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of colonoscopy to reduce colorectal cancer-specific mortality; however, several randomized controlled trials comparing colonoscopy with other strategies are in progress...
May 15, 2018: American Family Physician
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29759553/the-role-of-heme-iron-molecules-derived-from-red-and-processed-meat-in-the-pathogenesis-of-colorectal-carcinoma
#14
REVIEW
S M K Gamage, Lakal Dissabandara, Alfred King-Yin Lam, Vinod Gopalan
Emerging evidence that heme iron in red meat is a risk factor for colorectal carcinogenesis is a topic that has received recent scrutiny. This review aims to summarise the mechanism of colorectal carcinogenesis by heme contained in red and processed meat. Heme iron can induce cytotoxicity by 'cytotoxic heme factor' and promote surface epithelial cell apoptosis and compensatory epithelial hyperplasia. Heme, induces peroxidation of lipids, leading to free radical formation and generation of DNA adducts in colorectal epithelial cells...
June 2018: Critical Reviews in Oncology/hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29759108/a-western-dietary-pattern-is-prospectively-associated-with-cardio-metabolic-traits-and-incidence-of-the-metabolic-syndrome
#15
Isabel Drake, Emily Sonestedt, Ulrika Ericson, Peter Wallström, Marju Orho-Melander
The aim of this study was to derive dietary patterns associated with cardio-metabolic traits and to examine whether these predict prospective changes in these traits and incidence of the metabolic syndrome (iMetS). Subjects from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study cardiovascular cohort without cardio-metabolic disease and related drug treatments at baseline (n 4071; aged 45-67 years, 40 % men) were included. We applied reduced rank regression on thirty-eight foods to derive patterns that explain variation in response variables measured at baseline (waist circumference, TAG, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose and insulin)...
May 2018: British Journal of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29753206/avoidable-colorectal-cancer-cases-in-denmark-the-impact-of-red-and-processed-meat
#16
Sofia Lourenço, Vibeke Berglund Gunge, Therese M-L Andersson, Camilla Liv Erthmann Andersen, Anne-Sofie Q Lund, Brian Køster, Gitte Laub Hansen
BACKGROUND: High red and processed meat intakes are associated with increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. The effect of eliminating or reducing red and processed meat consumption on CRC burden was not previously quantified in Denmark. The aim of this study was to calculate the possible effects of reductions in red and processed meat consumption on future CRC incidence in the Danish adult population. METHODS: Under six scenarios of prevalence exposure (meat consumption) the number of CRC cases in Denmark for a 30-year period (2016-2045) was estimated and compared to the projected number of CRCs if the prevalence of meat consumption remains constant...
May 9, 2018: Cancer Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752709/association-between-a-pro-plant-based-dietary-score-and-cancer-risk-in-the-prospective-nutrinet-sant%C3%A3-cohort
#17
Abou Kane-Diallo, Bernard Srour, Laury Sellem, Mélanie Deschasaux, Paule Latino-Martel, Serge Hercberg, Pilar Galan, Philippine Fassier, Françoise Guéraud, Fabrice H Pierre, Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Benjamin Allès, Mathilde Touvier
Diverse plant products (e.g. fruits, vegetables, legumes) are associated with decreased cancer risk at several locations while red and processed meat were found to increase cancer risk. A pro plant-based dietary score reflecting the relative contribution of consumed plant vs animal products was developed, and was associated with lower overall mortality, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk, among omnivorous adults. For the first time, we investigated the prospective associations between this pro plant-based dietary score and cancer risk...
May 11, 2018: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29751128/the-adenomatous-polyposis-coli-apc-mutation-spectra-in-different-anatomical-regions-of-the-large-intestine-in-colorectal-cancer
#18
Min Zhang, Da Yang, Barry Gold
The enhanced incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the U.S.A. has been linked to promutagens, such as heterocyclic aromatic amines, in the western diet that are produced by high temperature cooking of meat. However, a prior analysis of driver nonsense mutations in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene, which is mutated in 75% of human CRC, indicated that the C·G → A·T transversions produced by this class of mutagens were not enriched but actually lower than what would be statistically anticipated...
May 1, 2018: Mutation Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29728772/implementing-a-mediterranean-style-diet-outside-the-mediterranean-region
#19
REVIEW
Karen J Murphy, Natalie Parletta
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Populations surrounding the Mediterranean basin have traditionally reaped health benefits from a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), which may benefit Westernized countries plagued by chronic disease. But is it feasible to implement beyond the Mediterranean? To answer this question, we present evidence from randomized controlled trials that achieved high dietary compliance rates with subsequent physical and mental health benefits. RECENT FINDINGS: In the 1960s, the Seven Countries Study identified dietary qualities of Mediterranean populations associated with healthy aging and longevity...
May 4, 2018: Current Atherosclerosis Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713943/the-association-of-diet-gut-microbiota-and-colorectal-cancer-what-we-eat-may-imply-what-we-get
#20
REVIEW
Jia Yang, Jun Yu
Despite the success of colonoscopy screening and recent advances in cancer treatment, colorectal cancer (CRC) still remains one of the most commonly diagnosed and deadly cancers, with a significantly increased incidence in developing countries where people are adapting to Western lifestyle. Diet has an important impact on risk of CRC. Multiple epidemiological studies have suggested that excessive animal protein and fat intake, especially red meat and processed meat, could increase the risk of developing CRC while fiber could protect against colorectal tumorigenesis...
April 30, 2018: Protein & Cell
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